World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week’s top stories of the week include: 0:16 This teenager’s invention could change the world of electric cars 02:59 France is paying it’s drivers to get on their bikes 04:22 The psychological phenomenon that is hampering our response to climate change 05:33 Paris’s Riverside Booksellers are thriving once more

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Research: Free-Floating DNA And Oxidation Zones

On this week’s show: The U.S. government is partnering with academics to speed up the search for more than 80,000 soldiers who went missing in action, and how humans create their own “oxidation zone” in the air around them.

First up on the podcast this week, Tess Joosse is a former news intern here at Science and is now a freelance science journalist based in Madison, Wisconsin. Tess talks with host Sarah Crespi about attempts to use environmental DNA—free-floating DNA in soil or water—to help locate the remains of soldiers lost at sea. Also featured in this segment:

University of Wisconsin, Madison, molecular biologist Bridget Ladell Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution marine biologist Kirstin Meyer-Kaiser

Also this week, Nora Zannoni, a postdoctoral researcher in the atmospheric chemistry department at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, talks about people’s contributions to indoor chemistry. She chats with Sarah about why it’s important to go beyond studying the health effects of cleaning chemicals and gas stoves to explore how humans add their own bodies’ chemicals and reactions to the air we breathe. In a sponsored segment from Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for Custom Publishing, interviews Benedetto Marelli, associate professor at MIT, about winning the BioInnovation Institute & Science Prize for Innovation and how he became an entrepreneur. 

Equestrian Views: ‘Cadre Noir’ In Saumur, France

In the town of Saumur in France’s Loire Valley, the riders of the Cadre Noir represent excellence in the world of French equestrianism. The military-style academy trains elite riders who take part in top international competitions. Its expertise has been recognised by UNESCO, which listed it as Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2011. FRANCE 24 takes you behind the scenes of the stables.

The Cadre Noir is a corps of ecuyers, or instructors, at the French military riding academy École Nationale d’Équitation at Saumur in western France, founded in 1828. It also performs as an equestrian display team. Its name comes from the black uniforms that are still in use today.

Australian Architecture: ‘Jan Juc Studio’ Home Tour

Sitting underneath the eucalyptus trees, a slice of paradise awaits. As an architect’s own home, Jan Juc Studio creates a subtle ease between home and work life, whilst also establishing a humble presence within the surrounding landscape.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Roborock’s S7MaxV Ultra 00:15 – Introduction to Jan Juc Studio 00:41 – The Redevelopment of Jan Juc 01:08 – The Exterior vs. The Interior 01:36 – Creating Openness Through Doors 01:57 – Maximising What’s Available 02:23 – Multifunctional Screens 03:02 – The Materiality of The House 03:51 – Designing on The Move 04:10 – Surveying The Landscape 04:47 – Sun Filtration 05:14 – Architectural Clarity and A Humble Presence 05:52 – Roborock’s S7MaxV Ultra

Eldridge Anderson Architects draws inspiration from the architectural design they saw while travelling through Japan and incorporate nods to the built proportions, finishes and materials they experienced. In establishing an architect’s own home, Eldridge Anderson Architects creates architectural clarity by maximising what already existed.

Surrounding the façade of the home with wide timber screens made of pre-aged wood enables an indoor-outdoor connection. Able to adjust to the changing weather and seasons, the sliding timber screens and opening doors offer a range of different lighting configurations throughout the day.

When opened, the diffusing of light through the bedrooms creates a relaxed start to the day and, by afternoon, the warm golden glow reflects off the blackbutt flooring throughout, creating a gilded living space. Complementing the interior of an architect’s own home, the recycled blackbutt is used for doors and floors which harmonise with the timber façade and the eucalyptus trees surrounding the exterior. Eldridge Anderson Architects engages with an open plan living that allows for an architect’s own home to flow from room to room while optimizing upon liveable space throughout the home.

Encouraging a journey through light diffused halls, Eldridge Anderson’s design emphasises the idea of open plan living with rear doors that slide open to the backdrop of vegetation and landscape of Jan Juc Studio. As the sun dances through the coastal home, timber and humble material choices combine to establish a composed presence.

Striving for architectural clarity, Eldridge Anderson Architects’ Jan Juc Studio presents a refined execution of ideas that were inspired by travelling through Japan, materials that help interchange moods throughout the day and the connection of an architect’s own home to the surrounding landscape.

Cover: New York Review Of Books – Sept 22, 2022

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Outdoing Reality

The absurd incursions of the real into the intelligent life of the imagination are central to the Afghan American writer Jamil Jan Kochai’s fiction.

The Haunting of Hajji Hotak and Other Stories by Jamil Jan Kochai

Xanadu’s Architect

Despite designing over seven hundred buildings, the pioneering female architect Julia Morgan is now best known for a single, extremely eccentric commission: San Simeon, the estate of the legendary newspaper proprietor William Randolph Hearst.

Julia Morgan: An Intimate Biography of the Trailblazing Architect by Victoria Kastner, with photography by Alexander Vertikoff

Julia Morgan: The Road to San Simeon: Visionary Architect of the California Renaissance by Gordon L. Fuglie, Jeffrey Tilman, Karen McNeill, Johanna Kahn, Elizabeth McMillian, Kirby William Brown, and Victoria Kastner

Views: Wat Khiriwong In Western Thailand (4K)

Wat Kiriwong is located on the Dao-wa-dung hill in Amphoe Muang, Nakhon Sawan province. It has a sacred golden pagoda-Prajulamanee pagoda. On the fourth floor of pagoda, you will see the awesome scenery of Nakhon Sawan province 10 kilometers around. When you see eastward, there are Kao Gob, Boraped pond and Pak nam pho market. There are many beautiful mountains fascinated you. Prajulamanee pagoda is the huge pagoda located on the top of hill. There are four floors inside. The first floor is for worshiping the Buddha. The second floor has statues of famous monks, the Buddha’s footprints and amulet for sale also. On the third floor, there are important Buddha image in Thailand such as the emerald Buddha.

Stories: Fighting Returns To Ethiopia, China’s ‘Belt And Road’ Loans Sour

After a five-month hiatus, violence has returned to the northern region of Tigray—but that is just one of the conflicts threatening to pull the country to pieces.

China’s Belt and Road Initiative has made it a prominent developing-world lender. How will it deal with so many of its loans souring? And our obituaries editor reflects on Issey Miyake’s fashion-for-the-masses philosophy.

Front Page: The New York Times – September 2, 2022

Biden Warns That American Values Are Under Assault by Trump-Led Extremism

In a prime-time speech in Philadelphia, President Biden cast the midterm elections as a choice between his agenda and the extremism of “MAGA Republicans.”

Experts Brave Shelling to Reach Imperiled Ukrainian Nuclear Plant at Last

The team from the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog reached the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia plant for the first time since the war began, despite fresh shelling each side blamed on the other.