Category Archives: Birds

Nature Views: Birdlife In Texas Hill Country (CBS)

“Sunday Morning” takes us among hummingbirds and songbirds in the Texas Hill Country. Videographer: Scot Miller.

The Texas Hill Country is a geographic region of Central and South Texas, forming the southeast part of the Edwards Plateau. Given its location, climate, terrain, and vegetation, the Hill Country can be considered the border between the American Southeast and Southwest.

Texas Views: Water Birds At Smith Oaks Sanctuary

A rainy day doesn’t seem to bother the birds of Houston Audubon’s Smith Oaks Sanctuary.

Smith Oaks Bird Sanctuary is 177 acres of fields, woods, wetlands and ponds. Sixty-four acres were purchased by Houston Audubon with the help of Houston Audubon members, friends, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

African Views: Secretary Birds – ‘It Stomps Its Prey’

Secretary birds are also referred to as Sagittarius serpentarius. The secretary bird is one of the weird birds in Africa and it inhabits the savannah region with a head which is like that of an Eagle and the legs like that of a stork. The secretary bird is popularly known as a bird of prey together with its family. It has got technics of killing just like that of a snake which is fabric of legend. These are the 5 Interesting facts about the Secretary bird;

Nature Photography: A ‘Hovering Red-Tail Hawk’

The National Audubon Society announced the winners of their 2021 Audubon Photography Awards. Bill Bryant’s video of a Hovering Red-Tailed Hawk won First Place in their first-ever video award.

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Nature: A Great Horned Owl Chick In Florida

“Sunday Morning” takes us to Titusville, Florida, where a great horned owl chick is being cared for by Mom and Dad. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

Great horned owls are usually 18 – 25 inches tall, have tall ear tufts, and large yellow eyes. Their size, ear tufts, and eyes make them easily recognizable when seen during daylight hours.

They are found throughout Florida and roost in large, messy nests, in tall trees. The female is larger than the male, but the male has a larger and deeper voice box.

Views: Gannets In Cape Kidnappers, New Zealand

We leave you this Sunday morning at Cape Kidnappers in New Zealand, with gannets, who mate for life. Videographer: Jaime McDonald.

Australasian gannets nest in dense breeding colonies on the New Zealand mainland and coastal rocks and islands, as well as off south-east Australia and Tasmania. Although gannets can be seen occasionally from most places along the coasts of the New Zealand main islands, most gannetries are situated off the North Island. The largest mainland gannetry is at Cape Kidnappers, with around 5,000 breeding pairs. Other mainland breeding sites include Muriwai and Farewell Spit.

Australasian gannets mostly feed on waters over the continental shelf. They prefer flat ground for nesting, rather than cliff ledges. Breeding colonies are mostly situated at sites that are completely or largely surrounded by the sea, i.e. on islands or headlands.

Cape Kidnappers, also known as Te Kauwae-a-Māui and officially known as Cape Kidnappers / Te Kauwae-a-Māui, is a headland at the southeastern extremity of Hawke’s Bay on the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island and sits at the end of an 8 kilometres peninsula which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean.

Conservation: Saving The Hargila Stork In India

A wildlife photographer travels to India intent on documenting the rarest stork on earth but soon discovers a conservation hero and her inspiring efforts to rally a community to save it.

The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. The majority world’s remain population lives around the city of Guwahati and relies on a single garbage dump for food and nearby villages for nesting. As the adjutant’s nesting colonies occur outside of state protected areas in Assam, community conservation initiatives are the only hope for saving the bird from extinction. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, and the movement she has inspired, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. Despite this success and the momentum to conserve the species, the Greater Adjutant’s existence remains precarious.