Tag Archives: Agriculture

Cultural Views: A Barley Harvest In Himalayan Tibet

This is the most important season for the farmers, because it’s the harvest time for them. The hardy qingke barley, also known as highland barley, has long been the main crop on the plateau, and has become a staple of the Tibetan diet, used in almost every meal as tsampa, and even used to make barley wine and a number of other dishes. A unique, drought-resistant crop, barley is grown in many places across the plateau, and is the only grain crop that can grow comfortably in the higher reaches of the plateau, including the extreme north.

Analysis: The Truth About Buying Organic Foods

The organic food industry is a booming business. U.S. organic sales surged in 2020, jumping by 12.4% to $61.9 billion. With consumers being more health conscious than ever, they’re willing to pay more for what they perceive as better. But, what exactly does “organic” mean?

Ecology: Scientists Breed Plants With Fast-Growing Roots To Revitalize Land

Humanity faces major challenges. Could roots hold the answers? It’s possible: Research shows that roots have the potential to provide food for the world’s population, stop climate change and help extract resources in an environmentally friendly way. Plants must withstand periods of drought and heat, as well as flooding, and they use their roots to do this. Roots also help them actively search for nutrients in the soil, while warding off dangers such as pathogens and toxins.

Now, scientists at the research institute Forschungszentrum Jülich are investigating root growth using high-tech methods. The goal is to breed stress-resistant seeds for plants with robust roots. They are not alone: In Sweden, Professor Linda Maria Mårtensson is conducting research on a perennial wheat variety that will ensure higher yields while protecting the soil. Along the world’s coasts, too, roots are a lifesaver.

Coastal ecologist Professor Tjeerd Bouma has discovered that if special grasses are planted in front of dikes, they create a salt marsh that acts as a natural breakwater. Meanwhile, geochemist Dr. Oliver Wiche of the Technical University of Freiberg is researching something known as “phytomining.” He wants to know which plants are best suited for mining metals from the soil. Could this root research give rise to a new, environmentally friendly branch of industry?

Western Drought: Expect More Fires & Water Wars

As of mid-June, nearly three-quarters of the US’s West has been experiencing “severe,” “extreme,” or “exceptional” drought conditions. In addition to the states above, it also includes northern states like North Dakota and Montana.

Overall, climate change is playing a role. But there are smaller factors at play that are tied to climate change as well. Including…

  • Not enough rain. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) said the Southwest’s 2020 monsoon season (read: ‘nonsoon’) was “the hottest and driest summer/monsoon season on record.” And the decrease in rainfall is having an impact on today’s drought (think: not enough water for crops, lakes, or reservoirs). And for the little rain that has fallen, it could dry up faster because of…
  • Warmer temps. The NOAA dubbed 2020 the second-hottest year on record. And in late June, a record-breaking heat wave hit the Pacific Northwest, with the temperature reaching up to 112 degrees Fahrenheit in places like Portland, OR. (Psst…if you’re dealing with hot weather, here are some tips to stay safe.) Hotter, drier weather creates a thirsty environment, which speeds up evaporation. Rising temps are also causing snowpacks to melt faster, and they’re reportedly producing less runoff – a vital water resource. All of which means there’s less water available for communities and ecosystems.

Experts are also worried that the current dry and hot conditions will have a ripple effect, which brings us to wildfires. Last year’s West Coast wildfire season was the worst ever. Fires in California killed 31 people, burned more than 4 million acres, and destroyed thousands of buildings and structures. And this year, states like Arizona have seen an early start to their wildfire season. But the effects of the drought stretch even further.

Agriculture: ‘World’s Largest Farm Equipment’

Farming machinery has become supersized over the past several decades! Larger and larger equipment is needed to sustain the demand for food products. Here are the top 15 biggest farming machines!

Future Of Food: The ‘Blue Revolution’ (Video)

Today we face the daunting challenge of feeding nearly 8 billion people, and that number will grow to at least 11 billion by 2100. With already half of all the habitable land on Earth dedicated to agriculture, we’re starting to run out of options. Could the Blue Revolution be our answer?

Learn more here: https://www.nature.org/content/dam/tn…

FOOD & AGRICULTURE: “The Robot Producing Crops Of The Future” (WSJ Video)

Arizona has what researchers call “the climate of tomorrow, today.” Scientists are using a 30-ton robotic field scanner in the state to study plant genetics and hopefully develop stress-resilient crops.

Photo: Jesse Rieser for The Wall Street Journal

More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com

Urban Agriculture: Agripolis Will Open World’s Largest Rooftop Farm In Paris In 2020

From a Curbed.com online article:

Agripolis Urban FarmNext year, French company Agripolis is opening a 150,000-square-foot urban farm in Paris, where, according to The Guardian, it will grow more than 2,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables every day during high season. The farm is located in the 15th arrondissement, where it will occupy the rooftop of a sprawling entertainment complex that’s currently undergoing renovations.

The farm will be home to more than 30 different species of plants that will grow vertically with aeroponic farming, a method that uses nutrient-filled mist to nourish the produce. Local residents will be able to secure plots of land, effectively turning the garden into a community space. “Our vision is a city in which flat roofs and abandoned surfaces are covered with these new growing systems,” Pascal Hardy, head of Agripolis told The Guardian.

 

http://agripolis.eu/project/la-plus-grande-ferme-urbaine-en-toiture-au-monde/

To read more click on the following link: https://www.curbed.com/2019/8/15/20806540/paris-rooftop-urban-farm-opening