Tag Archives: Media

Magazines: “The New Yorker” – 95 Years Of Excellence, And “Eustace Tilley” Covers (1925 – 2020)

The New Yorker 95th Anniversary IssueIn February, 1925, Rea Irvin, The New Yorker’s first art editor, designed the cover of the magazine’s inaugural issue. That cover’s central character, a dandy peering at a butterfly through a monocle, would come to be known as Eustace Tilley, and he has graced the cover of the magazine nearly every February in the ninety-five years since. This is all a matter of historical record—but Barry Blitt, in this year’s Anniversary Issue, tells a different origin story. We recently talked to Blitt about drawing a familiar face.

You’ve drawn many a Eustace Tilley. Is there something pleasing about revisiting familiar forms?

Well, certain familiar forms are probably traumatic to revisit, but Tilley is a joy to draw repeatedly. All the hard work has been done for you—it’s a beautifully designed image. Hard to make a mess of those shapes and colors, though I give it the old college try.

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Podcast Interviews: 75-Year Old Travel Writer And Editor Pamela Fiori

Monocle 24 The Stack PodcastPamela Fiori’s career in magazine publishing spans more than forty years. She was editor In chief of Town & Count , America’s premier magazine for the affluent in America, for seventeen years. Before that, she was editor in chief of Travel + Leisure for fourteen years. 

An authority on luxury, travel, style, connoisseurship, and philanthropy, Flori writes and speaks frequently on these subjects. Her first book, Stolen M ents, Is a tribute to the photography of Ronny Jaques, a contemporary of Richard Avedon and Lillian Sassman. She has also written In the Sprit of Capri and in the spirit of St. Barths for Assoullne.

Media Infographics: “Radio’s Unparalleled Reach” In U.S. (Statista)

Radio's Unparalleled Reach Infographic Statista.com

With all the talk about digital media, it’s easy to forget how powerful traditional media such as radio and television still are. Radio in particular rarely gets credited for what it still is: a true mass medium. According to Nielsen, radio even trumps TV in terms of its weekly reach.

According to Nielsen’s measurements, far more than 200 million Americans aged 18 and older listen to the radio at least once a week, equaling a reach of 92 percent of the adult population. Television came in a close second with a weekly reach of 86 percent, while 80 percent of U.S. adults now use apps or browse the web on a smartphone in any given week.

While radio does win in terms of sheer reach, TV remains unparalleled with respect to average daily usage. According to Nielsen’s measurements, U.S. adults spend an average of 4 hours and 27 minutes a day watching TV (live and time-shifted), which is more than 2.5 times the amount of time they listen to the radio (1h 42m).

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Podcast Interviews: Travel & Style Magazine “Cereal” Editor Rosa Park

The Modern House podcast logoRosa Park is founding editor of Cereal, which is dedicated to thoughtful travel and lifestyle stories and known for its pared-back aesthetic. Here she reveals her love of Bath’s sandstone buildings, the unique style of her family home – and why you’d better not call her a minimalist.

Our guest for the first episode is Rosa Park, founding editor of Cereal magazine, a biannual publication dedicated to thoughtful travel and lifestyle stories and known for its pared-back aesthetic. Rosa was born in Seoul, grew up between Korea and Canada, studied in Boston and worked in New York before settling in Bath, Somerset, where she now presides over the magazine, a series of travel guides and her latest venture, art gallery Francis.

Cereal Magazine

Cereal Magazine content

Tune in to hear Rosa talk about how she got Cereal off the ground, why beige is her favourite colour and why she doesn’t define home as being about a place. Plus, hear why Rosa’s picked Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge, Vincent Van Duysen’s home in Antwerp and her parents’ home in Seoul as her top three picks.

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Podcast Interviews: “DOG” Magazine Editors Julian Victoria and Emily Rogers

Monocle 24 The Stack logoMonocle 24 “The Stack” speaks to Julian Victoria and Emily Rogers, the duo behind ‘Dog’ magazine.

DOG is a modern lifestyle magazine exploring the presence and influence of dogs and their owners in society. Each issue centres on a specific breed and theme and explores the meaningful interactions between individuals and their dogs through photographic portfolios, interviews and personal essays.

Dog Magazine Instagram photos

Visual, poetic, current and innovative, DOG offers original content and a new perspective on what it means to be a dog lover and owner. Content for DOG comes from a variety of creative sources, including emerging and established photographers, designers, illustrators, writers and visual artists.

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Top Science Podcasts: Orbiting A Black Hole, Parrots And Online Media Consumption (Nature)

Nature PodcastsListen to the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe. This week, observations of objects orbiting a black hole, and rethinking how we measure screen-time.

In this episode:

00:45 Observing the centre of the galaxy

Researchers have uncovered a population of dust-enshrouded objects orbiting the supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy. Research Article: Ciurlo et al.

06:34 Research Highlights

A London landmark’s height lends itself to a physics experiment, and generous behaviour in parrots. Research Highlight: An iconic structure in London moonlights as a scientific toolResearch Highlight: Parrots give each other gifts without promise of reward

09:00 The human ‘screenome’ project

To understand the effects of online media consumption, researchers argue that the way it’s measured needs to change. Comment: Time for the Human Screenome Project

17:26 News Chat

A decline in human body temperature, and a new report on research culture. News: Not so hot: US data suggests human bodies are cooling downNews: Stressful, aggressive, damaging: huge survey reveals pressures of scientists’ working lives

 

New Books: “You’re Not Listening – What You’re Missing and Why It Matters” By Kate Murphy

You're Not Listening What You're Missing and Why It Matters Kate Murphy Celadon Books January 2020“When you listen and really grasp what another person is saying, your brainwaves and those of the speaker are literally in sync. By looking at brain scans, neuroscientists have found that the greater overlap and similarity of neural impulses between speaker and listener, the greater the understanding. It’s observable, measurable proof of listening, comprehension, and connection. You know it’s happening when you have that “Oh I get it” moment or sense of clarity when someone else is talking. You’re on the same wavelength, even if you don’t necessarily agree.”

In her new book You’re Not Listening, Kate Murphy draws attention to the worldwide epidemic of not listening, exposing the profound impact that it is having on us all and showing what we can do about it.

In this always illuminating and often humorous deep dive, Murphy explains why we’re not listening, what it’s doing to us, and how we can reverse the trend. She makes accessible the psychology, neuroscience, and sociology of listening while also introducing us to some of the best listeners out there (including a CIA agent, focus group moderator, bartender, radio producer, and top furniture salesman). Equal parts cultural observation, scientific exploration, and rousing call to action that’s full of practical advice, You’re Not Listening is to listening what Susan Cain’s Quiet was to introversion. It’s time to stop talking and start listening.

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