Tag Archives: Apollo Magazine

Art: ‘Apollo Magazine – December 2020 Issue’

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Kirsten Tambling on Shakespearean relics; Susan Moore visits a museum-worthy collection of Old Masters; Alisa LaGamma on African art and attribution; Alice Gorman asks who is responsible for protecting space heritage
 
REVIEWS | Robert Barry on Bruce Nauman in London; Mark Evans on Prince Albert’s Raphael Collection in Woking; Imelda Barnard on Haegue Yang in St Ives; Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth on the history of European porcelain; Andrew Hussey on Isidore Isou; Thomas Marks on a collection of recipes by video artists
 
MARKET | Susan Moore previews December sales in New York and looks back at the autumn season; Emma Crichton-Miller on the enduring appeal of German limewood sculpture
 
PLUS | The Apollo Awards 2020Caroline Campbell and Michael Prodger consider the consolations offered by historic paintingsMadeleine Schwartz on fakery and the Russian avant-garde; Christopher Turner in search of Bologna’s historical waxworks; Charles Holland on architectural copies and cover versions; Robert O’Byrne on the brilliantly named painter Hercules Brabazon Brabazon

ARTS & LITERATURE: “APOLLO MAGAZINE November 2020”

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Denzil Forrester interviewed by Gabriel CoxheadKristen Treen on Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ monuments to the American Civil War; Emilie Bickerton visits the Musée Cernuschi in Paris; Glenn Adamson defends progressive deaccessioningThomas Marks visits the Box in Plymouth; mathematician John Coates shows Susan Moore his collection of early Japanese ceramics
 
REVIEWS | Sheila McTighe on Artemisia Gentileschi at the National GallerySamuel Reilly on Michael Armitage at the Haus der Kunst; Mark Polizzotti on Matisse’s artists’ books; Emily Knight on Joseph Wright of Derby; Sameer Rahim on Islamic influences in European architecture; Anthony Cutler on the Turin Shroud
 
MARKET | A preview of the second part of Asian Art in London; and the latest art market columns from Emma Crichton-MillerSusan Moore and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Timon Screech visits the shrines of the shoguns; Gillian Darley on the enduring appeal of crescents in architecture; Damian Thompson watches Yotam Ottolenghi make a feast inspired by the court of Versailles; Thomas Marks on the vital role of education in museumsRobert O’Byrne revisits the advertisements in Apollo 40 years ago
 

Profiles: London Artist Flora Yukhnovich – ‘Art Of Tiepolo As Abstraction’

September 23, 2020

…she decided to trace Tiepolo’s travels across Europe, from Venice to Germany and Spain, riffing on the works he created in these different places. ‘I realised I had basically followed Tiepolo’s journey since leaving Venice towards his death,’ she notes. ‘It was quite weird and morbid but also kind of appropriate for finishing off my Tiepolo cycle.’

Déjà vu isn’t dangerous for Flora Yukhnovich – it’s part of her art. ‘I think what I find really rewarding about working from old paintings is the moment when it all comes together and you feel like you recognise it,’ she tells me. ‘It’s such a weird, instinctive feeling […] like kissing an old friend.’

A shift in interest coincided with an invitation to Venice, via a residency with Victoria Miro. It was while living there during the summer of 2019 that she became immersed in the work of Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and his own particular brand of Venetian rococo. The resulting exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery is called ‘Barcarole’ after the song sung by Venetian gondoliers, a tune known for its rhythmic sway in time with lapping lagoon waves.

Her Website

Read more

Arts & Literature: “Apollo Magazine September 2020”

APOLLO MAGAZINE – SEPTEMBER 2020

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Tom Stammers on women collectors in 19th-century France; Nalini Malani interviewed by Debika RayAlexander Marr puzzles over Isaac Oliver’s most mysterious portrait; Sophie Barling visits the Villa Carmignac; Thomas Marks on fast food and fine art
 
REVIEWS | Peter Parker on Barnett Freedman at Pallant House; Caroline Bugler on Cranach at Compton Verney; Tom Fleming on Bill Brandt and Henry Moore at Hepworth Wakefield; Michael Hall on Edwardian houses; Clare Bucknell on visual traces of the English Civil War; Cora Gilroy-Ware on neoclassical style
 
MARKET | Jo Lawson-Tancred on museums and online shopping; and the latest art market columns from Emma Crichton-MillerSusan Moore and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Thomas Marks visits the Palazzo Schifanoia in Ferrara; Paul Rennie on public information posters and the pandemicOtto Saumarez Smith condemns plans to destroy Coventry’s post-war architecture; Gareth Harris and Matt Stromberg investigate mass layoffs at museumsRobert O’Byrne on Venice in peril

Arts & Literature: “Apollo Magazine – July 2020”

Apollo Magazine logo

INSIDE THE ISSUE
FEATURES | Eric Fischl interviewed by Thomas MarksLinda Wolk-Simon on the life and legacy of Raphael; Joanne Pillsbury on the art of the Olmecs; Samuel Reilly on private restitution of colonial-era artefacts; Christopher Turner on shopfronts and gallery facadesJosie Thaddeus-Johns on John Cage’s mushrooms
REVIEWS | Isabelle Kent on Murillo at the National Gallery of Ireland; Tom Stammers on the British fashion for French interiors; James Lingwood on Stephen Shore’s photographs; Robert O’Byrne on The Buildings of Ireland
MARKET | Melanie Gerlis on art businesses after lockdown; a preview of Parcours des Mondes; and the latest art market columns from Susan Moore and Emma Crichton-Miller
PLUS | Rowan Moore and Tamsin Dillon on the future of public spacesSusan Moore on the mysterious ‘Barbus Müller’ sculptures; William Aslet on Palladio’s monument to the plague in Venice; Robert O’Byrne on Apollo and the Second World War

Top New Art Magazines: “Apollo – May 2020” Issue

INSIDE THE ISSUE
FEATURES | Julio Le Parc interviewed by Gabrielle SchwarzGlenn Adamson on the MFA Boston at 150; Aaron Rosen on the Rothko Chapel in Houston; Valeria Costa-Kostritsky on rebuilding Notre-Dame
REVIEWS | Morgan Falconer on Donald Judd at MoMA; Edward J. Sullivan on Mexican muralism at the Whitney; Maichol Clemente on Renaissance terracottas in Padua; Susan Owens on ghosts in ancient Rome; Craig Burnett on Philip Guston; Stephen Patience on Blake Gopnik’s biography of Andy Warhol; Thomas Marks on F.T. Marinetti’s Futurist Cookbook
MARKET | Gareth Harris on online viewing rooms; and the latest art market columns from Susan Moore and Emma Crichton-Miller
PLUS | Thomas Campbell and Adam Koszary debate the role of the digital museumJames Wilkes on trompe-l’oeil and artistic trickery; Kathryn Hughes on the image of Florence NightingaleTimothy Brittain-Catlin on contemporary architectural follies; Thomas Marks in search of art during lockdownRobert O’Byrne on an exceptional collection of Chinese art

Read more or subscribe

1950’s Artwork: English Painter John Minton’s “Lavish” Food Book Covers

From Apollo Magazine article (April 13, 2020):

John Minton Illustration for French Cooking by Eizabeth DavidMinton had gone on to produce a series of spectacularly colourful oil paintings of Corsica on his return to London, exhibiting them at the Lefevre Gallery in 1949. Many of them depicted fruit and fish and other ingredients for Mediterranean cuisine, and so confirmed Minton as the obvious choice for the David commission. 

David delightedly recalled that: ‘In the shop windows [Minton’s] brilliant blue Mediterranean bay, his tables spread with white cloths and bright fruit, bowls of pasta and rice, a lobster, pitchers and jugs and bottles of wine, could be seen far down the street.’

Variations on these two images were used for the double-page spread on which the title appeared in David’s second book, French Country Cooking (1951), while the wrap-around image on the dust jacket depicted the interior of a well-stocked kitchen, many of its utensils borrowed from the author to ensure accurate representation.

Read full article

Francis John Minton (25 December 1917 – 20 January 1957) was an English painter, illustrator, stage designer and teacher. After studying in France, he became a teacher in London, and at the same time maintained a consistently large output of works. In addition to landscapes, portraits and other paintings, some of them on an unusually large scale, he built up a reputation as an illustrator of books.

In the mid-1950s, Minton found himself out of sympathy with the abstract trend that was then becoming fashionable, and felt increasingly sidelined. He suffered psychological problems, self-medicated with alcohol, and in 1957 died by suicide.

From Wikipedia

Today: 250th Anniversary Of William Wordsworth’s Birth – “That Inward Eye”

From an Apollo Magazine article (April 7. 2020):

‘They flash upon that inward eye
 Which is the bliss of solitude’
.
William Wordsworth Daffodils - I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud - Amazon photo‘We are fond of tracing the resemblance between Poetry and Painting,’ wrote William Wordsworth  (1770–1850) in the famous ‘Preface’ to Lyrical Ballads (1800), ‘and, accordingly, we call them Sisters.’ To speak of the ‘sister arts’ was indeed a critical platitude of the age, though as it happens Wordsworth’s attitude towards painting wasn’t normally very sisterly. 

 

Apollo Magazine logoWhen, in 1840 or so, a well-meaning houseguest called Margaret Gillies made a drawing of the 70-year old Mrs Wordsworth, everyone agreed that it was an excellent likeness; but her kind act was rewarded with a testy and somewhat ungracious sonnet from the sitter’s husband. He preferred to visualise Mary in her salad days: ‘’tis a fruitless task to paint for me, / Who, yielding not to changes Time has made, / By the habitual light of memory see / Eyes unbedimmed, see bloom that cannot fade, / And smiles that from their birth-place ne’er shall flee / Into the land where ghosts and phantoms be’.
.
All she possesses, as a painter, is the outward eye: ‘that inward eye’ is the poet’s hallmark, as of course Miss Gillies would have known from Wordsworth’s most famous poem, the one about the daffodils – ‘They flash upon that inward eye / Which is the bliss of solitude’. By chance we know (because Wordsworth left it on record, saying they were the best thing in the poem) that those two lines were actually contributed by Mary, so the uxoriousness of the thing is double: not only does she evade the merely visual but she also possesses the innate genius to be able to name the imaginative power that so transcends it.
.

Tribute: Architect-Author Michael Sorkin – “City Air Makes You Free” (1948-2020)

From an Apollo Magazine online article (March 31, 2020):

Michael Sorkin All Over The MapUltimately he was a humane critic of the contemporary city, a serious, funny and poetic voice defending the powerless against big capital and an articulator of how architecture should be used as a tool of resistance. He is indelibly associated with New York, a city he loved with a fervour despite its faults, and of which he defended every inch as a public good. Number 210 in his list was the medieval German phrase ‘Stadtluft macht frei’ – ‘city air makes you free’. He will survive through his magical writing, which makes us all a little freer.

Michael Sorkin, who died last week of complications due to Covid-19, gained his reputation as the architecture critic of The Village Voice in New York, which, in the 1980s, was a publication with a formidable reach and impact on a city just beginning to boom again. He launched fierce attacks against the banality of the contemporary city, the rapacity and greed of developers (notably the current president, including in a 1985 piece entitled ‘Dump the Trump’) and the loss of great landmarks. But he was no nostalgist; he revelled in the potential of architecture to catalyse change and excoriated his contemporaries for caving in to big business, for building prisons and being complicit in a denuded public realm.

Read full article

Art Magazines: “Apollo” April 2020 Issue Released

INSIDE THE ISSUE
FEATURES | Michael Prodger visits the newly resplendent Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden; Yinka Shonibare talks to Samuel ReillySeamus Perry considers the visual qualities of Wordsworth’s poems; Tim Smith-Laing on the modern monsters of Léopold Chauveau; Emilie Bickerton looks at how museums tackle the subject of cinema; Christopher Turner talks to Grażyna Kulczyk, founder of the Muzeum Susch
REVIEWS | Matthew Sperling on Picasso’s works on paper at the Royal Academy; Nicholas Hatfull on Edward Hopper at the Fondation Beyeler; Scott Nethersole on Renaissance art in the regions of Italy; Alan Powers on the life of Humphrey Stone; Max Norman on a new study of Poussin; Peter Parker on John Minton’s illustrations for Elizabeth David’s cookery books
MARKET | Tim Maxwell and Tamara Bell on cybersecurity; and the latest art market columns from Susan Moore and Emma Crichton-Miller
PLUS | Matt Stromberg and J. Patrice Marandel consider if LACMA has lost its way; Kitty Hauser takes a personal view of the bushfires in Australia; Rachel Cohen on the resurgence of interest in the painter Beauford DelaneyFatema Ahmed on a display of chivalry in Abu Dhabi; Douglas Murphy visits an art nouveau masterpiece in NancyRobert O’Byrne on a talented Dutch curator; and Thomas Marks on museums and the art world in a time of crisis