Tag Archives: Future of Homebuilding

Future Of Homebuilding: World’s First 3D-Printed Community Being Built

The Vulcan 2 3D printer can print a house in just 24 hours of print time. This technology is currently being put to the test in rural Mexico, where it’s being used to build the world’s first 3D-printed community, designed for residents living on less than $3 a day.

Homebuilding: World’s Biggest “3D Printed” Building Completed

World's Biggest 3D Printed Buiding in Dubai Dezeen video December 20 2019Robotic construction company Apis Cor has used its technology to build the world’s largest 3D-printed building, a two-storey administrative office in Dubai. 

Measuring 9.5 metres high with a floor area of 640 square metres, Apis Cor built the record-breaking structure for the Dubai Municipality. Apis Cor developed a gypsum-based material to run through the printer and sourced a local producer. The printing took place out in the open, to prove that the technology could handle a harsh environment without humidity and temperature control.

Homebuilding Trends: Japanese Prefab “Yō no Ie (Sun House)” By MUJI Is Durable And Efficient

From an Interactiongreen.com online release:

MUJI-House-yo-no-ie-inside image from Ryochin Keikaku 2019the Yō no Ie re-imagines a life in suburban-rural areas, rather than urban-suburban. This reflects quiet yet significant social changes – or rather, shifts in life priorities of people and how they define happiness. In the 20th century, when society was excited about economic growth, everyone dreamed of living in cities, working at big companies by navigating a world of fierce competition, either spending an eye-popping amount of money on a small urban condo that quickly became a norm, or traveling hours to commute from a more affordable home in rapidly sprawling suburbs.

MUJI House released the “陽の家 (Yō no Ie, or Sun House)” in September, 2019, its 4th product since it debuted the “木の家 (Ki no ie, or Wood House) in 2004. Upon the release, they opened its model house at a glamping site called “Forest Living” in Isumi-City, Chiba which is about a 2-hour drive from Tokyo.

To read more: https://www.interactiongreen.com/muji-house-yo-no-ie-model-home/

Homebuilding Trends: Affordable Housing Shortage Makes Modular, Prefab Homes A Must

From a Smart Cities Dive online opinion article;

Modular Advantage MagazineThe reality, however, is that modular, prefabricated housing can exceed the limitations put upon it by popular conceptions of trailer parks and postwar government housing. Not only are they certainly faster – an important factor in cost, as the cost of land and construction have as much as doubled in some parts of America within the past decade – but also of a higher quality.

Looking toward the expected lifespan of these homes, due to the precision of factory construction and the availability of new materials, some prefab or modular homes have the potential to even outlast traditionally-built, on-site housing.

A far cry from the “prefabs” of the 1950s, modules can be manufactured off-site in factories, in a cutting edge process of designing and building homes that can drive real change in an industry that has seen little change in centuries. Modular manufacturing permits us to get down to a level of detail and robustness that traditional architects, structural engineers and mechanical and electrical engineering consultants do not normally go into.

http://www.modular.org/

To read more: https://www.smartcitiesdive.com/news/affordable-housing-shortage-highlights-the-need-for-construction-to-enter-t/568435/

Future Of Homebuilding: Prefab “Sunset BUD LivingHome” By Douglas W. Burdge Architects

From a PlantPrefab.com online review:

Douglas W. Burdge - Sunset BUD LivingHomeThe idea for this ADU was conceived in the wake of the 2018 Woolsey Fire, as a way to help families reinhabit their properties while rebuilding their primary residence. All “BUD” designs provide beautiful living spaces that can be delivered quickly and enjoyed for generations as a valuable addition to almost any property.

Burdge Architects
https://www.buaia.com/

This innovative accessory dwelling unit (ADU) offers four different size and layout options to fit almost any property. From a compact studio, to a two-bed, two-bath home with garage, all configurations meet California ADU size allowances and are designed for fast and efficient prefabrication at Plant.

To read more: https://www.plantprefab.com/models/19

Future Of Homebuilding: “Makatita” By Liberté Tiny Houses “Maximizes Light”

From a Dwell.com online review:
Nature dictates the shape and materials of this Dutch cabin in the woods.

When Willeke Makatita approached Gijsbert Schutten and Gijs Coumou of Liberte Tiny Houses, she had one very specific request: a compact dwelling that would let her simplify her life and live as close to nature as possible. “Willeke loves walking, camping, and bushcraft,” Schutten says. “She asked for a home that would suit those passions.” 

Website: https://libertetinyhouses.nl/nl_NL/tiny-house-makatita

To read more: https://www.dwell.com/article/makatita-liberte-tiny-houses-15bab0da?utm_medium=email&utm_source=postup&utm_campaign=&list=1

Homebuilding Trends: “Squirrel Park” Homes In Oklahoma Built From Used Shipping Containers

From a Dezeen.com online review:

Squirrel Park Smith Design CompanyTwo containers make up the ground floor of each house, with two more cantilevered three metres over one end to create a sheltered porch below and a first-floor terrace off the master bedroom.

Oklahoma has a hot climate, so the steel containers have been painted white to reduce heat gain, while mirrored strips reflect the sun’s glare.

Squirrel Park Smith Design CompanySquirrel Park is a scheme of four houses made from converted shipping containers in Oklahoma City, USA, by Allford Hall Monaghan MorrisBuilt for a developer client who plans to live in one of the properties, Squirrel Park has four two-bedroom homes on a 2,500-square-metre site.

https://smithdesigncompany.com/squirrel-park/6y6kpxgw1o63uvt09y8viifgw7mj5q

A total of 16 lightly used steel shipping containers – which had “been around the world once” according to AHHM – were used to make the four houses. The three family homes not occupied by the developer will be rented at “competitive market rates”.

To read more: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/11/20/squirrel-park-ahmm-shipping-container-housing-oklahoma/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Dezeen&utm_content=Daily%20Dezeen+CID_edb46f16e2683f4b06c3c31148e551ac&utm_source=Dezeen%20Mail&utm_term=AHMM%20unveils%20shipping-container%20housing%20development%20in%20Oklahoma

Future Of Homebuilding: “Cork House” By Matthew Barnett Howland (2019)

From Architect Matthew Barnett Howland website:

Matthew Barnett Howland Cork HouseCork House embodies a strong whole life approach to sustainability, from resource through to end-of-life.  Expanded cork is a pure bio-material made with waste from cork forestry.  The bark of the cork oak is harvested by hand every nine years without harming the tree or disturbing the forest.  Matthew Barnett Howland Cork HouseThis gentle agro-industry sustains the Mediterranean cork oak landscapes, providing a rich biodiverse habitat that is widely recognised. This compelling ecological origin of expanded cork is mirrored at the opposite end of the building’s lifecycle.  The construction system is dry-jointed, so that all 1,268 blocks of cork can be reclaimed at end-of-building-life for re-use, recycling, or returning to the biosphere.

Completed in 2019, Cork House was designed by Matthew Barnett Howland with Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton.

Cork House is a brand new and radically simple form of plant-based construction.  Monolithic walls and corbelled roofs are made almost entirely from solid load-bearing cork.  This highly innovative self-build construction kit is designed for disassembly, is carbon-negative at completion and has exceptionally low whole life carbon.

To read more: https://www.matthewbarnetthowland.com/

Future Of Homebuilding: “Stilt Studios” By Architect Alexis Dornier Are “Prefab And Movable”

From a Dezeen.com online review:

Alexis Dornier Architects Stilt StudiosStilt Studios are small homes on stilts, which could be erected in a variety of different places without causing any damage to the landscape.

“This situation calls for us to tread lightly through prefab ‘PropTech’ structures that could be packed up and re-erected someplace else,” he told Dezeen. “Someone could also put this unit into their garden and possibly start a little side business for themselves.”

Bali-based architect Alexis Dornier has developed a concept for prefabricated homes that could easily be taken apart and reassembled in a new location.

The design follows the principles of the circular economy, which calls for products and materials to be kept in use as long as possible, for there to be no waste or pollution, and for natural environments to be restored.

To read more: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/11/09/stilt-studios-alexis-dornier-prefab-houses/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Dezeen&utm_content=Daily%20Dezeen+CID_4addbf275a17655a1d05980d3103681c&utm_source=Dezeen%20Mail&utm_term=Alexis%20Dornier%20designs%20prefab%20homes%20on%20stilts%20that%20could%20be%20moved%20from%20place%20to%20place

 

Future Of Housing: “GO Homes” Are Prefabricated, “Highly Insulated, Air-Sealed” & 90% Efficient

Froom a Dwell.com online article:

GO Home by GO Logic Prefab Homes PhotosTo meet Passive House standards, the Cousins River Residence features an airtight building envelope, triple-glazed windows with a u-value of 0.16, a heat recovery ventilation system with 90% efficiency, and a 4.6 kW south-facing photovoltaic array on the garage roof that makes the house nearly net-zero energy.

With their three children grown up and out of the house, Nico and Ellen Walsh were ready to downsize from their old Victorian home to a smaller abode better aligned with their environmentally friendly principles.

The heart of every GO Home is a highly insulated, air-sealed building shell designed to use 90 percent less energy than a conventional new house, even in chilly northern New England. On sites with a favorable southern exposure, adding a modest array of photovoltaic panels yields a zero-energy home.

When the couple spotted Belfast-based design-build firm GO Logic’s LEED Platinum GO Home on the cover of Maine Home and Design Magazine, they instantly fell in love with the modern high-performance design and the possibilities of a nearly net-zero energy house.

To read more: https://www.dwell.com/article/cousins-river-residence-go-logic-opal-eead5541?utm_medium=email&utm_source=postup&utm_campaign=&list=1