ARTS & LITERATURE: “APOLLO MAGAZINE November 2020”

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Denzil Forrester interviewed by Gabriel CoxheadKristen Treen on Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ monuments to the American Civil War; Emilie Bickerton visits the Musée Cernuschi in Paris; Glenn Adamson defends progressive deaccessioningThomas Marks visits the Box in Plymouth; mathematician John Coates shows Susan Moore his collection of early Japanese ceramics
 
REVIEWS | Sheila McTighe on Artemisia Gentileschi at the National GallerySamuel Reilly on Michael Armitage at the Haus der Kunst; Mark Polizzotti on Matisse’s artists’ books; Emily Knight on Joseph Wright of Derby; Sameer Rahim on Islamic influences in European architecture; Anthony Cutler on the Turin Shroud
 
MARKET | A preview of the second part of Asian Art in London; and the latest art market columns from Emma Crichton-MillerSusan Moore and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Timon Screech visits the shrines of the shoguns; Gillian Darley on the enduring appeal of crescents in architecture; Damian Thompson watches Yotam Ottolenghi make a feast inspired by the court of Versailles; Thomas Marks on the vital role of education in museumsRobert O’Byrne revisits the advertisements in Apollo 40 years ago
 

Top Architectural Design: ‘Cabin ANNA’ In Eindhoven, Netherlands (Video)

Architectural designer Caspar Schols is producing a flat-pack version of a garden shed with moving walls, which he built for his parents before he went to architecture school, as cabins for living and for working.

Schols drew on the Garden House pavilion he completed with no formal architecture training in Eindhoven in 2016 to develop two design: the ANNA Stay home and the ANNA Meet workplace. As with Garden House, the Cabin ANNA concepts have and inner beam-and-glass structure that is separated from the outer wooden walls and metal roof, and set on runners. This means they can be moved and outwards to create different layouts.

“A sellable, fully inhabitable house, a flat-pack that could be built and re-built anywhere in the world,” Schols said. “A dynamic home in the shape of an open platform to live with rather than against the elements, by playing with the configuration of the layers of the house – just like the way you dress yourself to suit different weather conditions, occasions and moods.”

Travel Videos: ‘Lagazuoi Cable Car’, Falzarego Pass In The Italian Dolomites

Breathtaking Epic views of surrounding Dolomite peaks. At the Falzarego Pass, a gondola rises to Mt. Lagazuoi. From the top you can enjoy a breathtaking view of the pass and the surrounding Dolomite peaks. Since 1965, this cable car has connected the Falzarego pass (2,117 m) with the Lagazuoi Refuge at an altitude of 2,746 metres. This lift facility kicked off the development of a popular tourist attraction area. Over the years, Mount Lagazuoi has become a popular skiing and hiking area of Cortina d’Ampezzo. The area has been made progressively attractive to tourist by the completion of the Open-air Museum of the First World War and, in 2018, of the exhibition pole Lagazuoi Expo Dolomiti.

Art: Monet’s ‘Islands At Port-Villez, 1897’ (Video)

“I want to paint like a bird sings,” Claude Monet once stated. In this episode of Expert Voices, Simon Shaw describes Monet’s direct and unmediated response to his subject matter. In The Islands in Port-Villez, one can feel just that – Monet sitting on his boat on the seine, absorbing his surroundings.

Design: French Architect Jean Nouvel’s ‘Cave Resort’ In Saudi Arabia (Video)

French architect Jean Nouvel has revealed plans for a  subterranean resort and hotel that would be hidden within the rock dwellings of AlUla, a natural region of north-west saudi arabia. located deep within the sharaan nature reserve, the project references the nearby hegra — a famous archaeological location that forms the country’s first UNESCO world heritage site. set to be completed by 2024, the development will include 40 guest suites and three villas. meanwhile, a retreat summit center nearby will feature 14 private pavilions.

Read more

Artist Profiles: 84-Year Old American Minimalist Frank Stella (Video)

In this episode of Expert Voices, Lisa Dennison discusses a masterful painting created by Frank Stella in the early part of his career. In the 1950s, Stella left Princeton and moved to New York at the height of Abstract Expressionism. Despite being a progenitor of Minimalism, Stella’s gestural hand is visible in the concentric squares – most likely influenced by the Abstract Expressionists.

Frank Philip Stella is an American painter, sculptor and printmaker, noted for his work in the areas of minimalism and post-painterly abstraction. Stella lives and works in New York City. 

Healthy Longevity: ‘The Science Of Aging’ (Salk Institute Video)

“Aging is such a profound part of not only the human experience but all life on Earth,” says Salk Vice President/Chief Science Officer Martin Hetzer. “It’s one of the big, untapped opportunities in biomedical research, particularly around questions on what role exercise, nutrition and cognitive stimulation play in staying healthy throughout life. It is important not to forget that getting older also comes with benefits; we want to take a holistic view of human health at all ages and understand it from all angles.”

Scientists want to answer intriguing questions: Why are some people able to “age well,” trekking up mountain ranges or rafting through white water in their nineties, while others live just as long, disease-free, but grow inexplicably frail decades sooner? Worse yet, why does advanced age sometimes diminish cognitive ability or even lead to dementia?

In numerous diseases, age itself is the major risk factor. Cancer, Alzheimer’s, heart disease and many other afflictions become profoundly more likely the older we get. Aside from extending our life spans, scientists want to know how we can also extend our health during advanced age. What is emerging from research is that aging–loosely defined as a systems-wide deterioration of our cells, organs and genetic material that results in disease or damage–is a collective and complex process in the body.

Website

Travel & Culture Videos: ‘Charente Region’, France

Roumazières-Loubert is known as the “city of clay”. This small town in France’s western Charente region has been turning the precious raw material into tiles for more than a century. For 40 years, Bernadette has been passionate about working with clay and says the local factory has become her second home. A little further south, the town of Chalais boasts opulent villas along the railway line: a unique architectural heritage. Jean-Louis shows us the impressive medieval castle, while Joël takes us to discover the world of traditional cattle farming, with calves fed under their mothers.

Travel Videos: ‘Comparing Different Airline Flights During Covid-19’ (WSJ)

As airports and airlines around the world continue to operate in the midst of a global pandemic, not every flight and region has the same Covid-19 protocols. Three WSJ reporters flew to different regions around the world to look at how air travel has changed.

Top Home Design Video: A ‘Storybook’, Converted Victorian Stable House In King’s Cross, London

Step through the looking glass and into the story-book inspired house of architect Sally Mackereth in King’s Cross, a playful world of mystery, discovery and fun in a former Victorian stable.

As head of her architecture and design studio, Sally draws from her 25-year career working internationally to design residential and commercial projects with her signature style, defined by material rich spaces that play with colour, texture and detail. Recent projects have included the updating of a listed artist’s studio in Chelsea, London, once the workspace of James Whistler, Augustus John and John Singer Sargent; and the interiors of pied-a-terre for an art-loving couple in Tribeca, New York City. A sense of fun and glamour runs through the practice’s work, and Sally’s own living spaces are no exception.

Kings Cross is a district in Central London, England, 2.5 miles (4.8 km) north west of Charing Cross. It is served by London King’s Cross railway station, the terminus of one of the major rail routes between London and the North.[3]

The area has been regenerated since the mid-1990s with the terminus of the Eurostar rail service at St Pancras International opening in 2007 and the rebuilding of King’s Cross station, a major redevelopment in the north of the area.

Read more