Tag Archives: Travel & Culture Videos

Travel & Culture: The Peloponnese In Greece

The Peloponnese is a hotspot for people from all over the world but still remains to its traditional Greek roots. The olive groves, its rich history and the stunning coastline, which provides kilometres of golden beaches – it never gets old.

The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus is a peninsula and geographic region in southern Greece. It is connected to the central part of the country by the Isthmus of Corinth land bridge which separates the Gulf of Corinth from the Saronic Gulf. 

Travel & Culture: Paris And ‘Les Parisiens’ (Video)

#Paris has been a source of fascination for centuries and the #French capital is one of the most visited cities in the world. By day or by night, it’s a beautiful city packed with towering #monuments, inspiring #museums and romantic cafés and yet, #tourists often say Paris would be so nice if it weren’t for the Parisians. So where does this bad reputation come from? In this episode of French Connections Plus, Florence Villeminot and Genie Gordula turn the spotlight on the City of Lights and its peculiar inhabitants: les Parisiens.

French Views: Lavender Fields Of Provence (Video)

The #lavender fields of the #Valensole Plateau, in France’s southern #Provence region, are an ocean of purple-blue. This is where much of the plant’s global production is grown. Many families in the region have been working with lavender for several generations. There are those who continue their activity in the traditional way and those who have opted for a more industrial method. Either way, these beautiful landscapes attract thousands of tourists from around the world.

Venice Views: ‘Vogalonga’ Rowing Regatta Returns

Colorful boats fill Venice as the Vogalonga returns after getting canceled last year.

The Vogalonga

The Vogalonga is a non-competitive celebration for all rowers.
This peaceful protest against wave damage caused by motor boats, and lagoon degeneration,
brings together Venetians and enthusiasts from around the world.

Cultural View: What Will An Independent Scotland Look Like? (Documentary)

What does it mean to be Scottish? Since Brexit, people here at the northernmost end of the island of Great Britain have been asking this question with renewed vigour. Now, with the Scottish Parliament election approaching, many Scots see their future outside of the United Kingdom. So how do ordinary Scottish citizens see their homeland?

On her journey through Scotland, journalist Diana Zimmermann quickly learns that it is impossible to travel through the country these days without talking about Brexit. Geography and history have brought the Scots to a breaking point. Just ask Sophie Gault, a deer-hunter whose breath-taking workplace is in the heart of the Highlands, at the foot of Ben Alder. “Being Scottish is something I’m really proud of,” says Gault, adding that taking this job was the best decision she ever made.

“Being with nature and with wildlife, it makes you appreciate Scotland even more. There’s always that sense of community. And I’m very proud of our own Scottish humour.” What does fisherman Victor Laurenson, who had hoped Brexit would bring him better fishing conditions, think of his country now?

Janey Godley, a comedian from Glasgow, brings yet another perspective: In the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, she says, the English told the Scots to vote against independence so that Scotland could stay in the EU. “It’s basically like your Mum and Dad saying – look – if you go to bed early, when you wake up, you will have a pony. And you go to bed, you sleep early, you wake up and there’s just a cushion in the shape of a cat instead, and it’s not even a good cat.”

Culture Views: ‘The Gábor Of Transylvania’ (Video)

For 500 years, Transylvania’s Gábor people have held onto their values and rituals. This film explores the insular world of the Gábor Roma, and asks whether they can maintain their traditional lives in a globalized world. The Romanian village of Karácsonyfalva is the center of the Gábor Roma community. More than 1,000 Gábor live there.

The men wear large black hats, the women long skirts. The men travel all over Europe as traders, while the women raise the children. Most Gábor belong to the Adventist denomination. Many only learned to read in order to study the Bible. Abstaining from pork and above all from alcohol and tobacco makes them targets of curiosity. Considered aristocratic among the Roma people, the Gábor have their own laws in all areas of life. Problems are solved within the community; in cases of conflict, even the police turn to the community leaders.

Their biggest and most important celebration is the wedding, the foundation of their society. Gábor marry exclusively among themselves. For this reason, girls are removed from school at age 11 and married at 14. Boys move from organized education to the “school of life” at 14. This documentary follows the marriage of 14-year-old Mundra to 16-year-old Bobbi, while giving a portrait of their families and the wider community. For the first time, they share an insight into their exciting, colorful, contradictory and insular world, in which wealth and poverty collide. This is a tight-knit community, one caught between tradition and the pressures of modernity.

Culture: ‘Dionysia Festival’ – Naxos Island, Greece

Inspired by Odysseus, historian Bettany Hughes is embarking on a journey through the Greek Islands. But at the island of Naxos, a different Greek hero appears to be calling: Dionysius, the God of wine and good times.

Naxos is a Greek island in the South Aegean, the largest of the Cyclades island group. Its fertile landscape spans mountain villages, ancient ruins and long stretches of beach. The namesake capital (also called Hora or Chora) is a port town filled with whitewashed, cube-shaped houses and medieval Venetian mansions. Kastro, a hilltop castle dating to the 13th century, houses an archaeological museum.