Tag Archives: National Gallery

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

This week: uproar over the National Gallery in London’s building plans—is it a sensitive makeover or like “an airport lounge”?

We talk to the director of the National Gallery, Gabriele Finaldi, about the gallery’s controversial plans for changes to its Sainsbury Wing, and to Rowan Moore, architecture critic at the Observer, about his views on the designs by the architect Annabel Selldorf, and how they respond to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s original Post-Modern building.

Tokini Peterside-Schwebig, the director of Art X Lagos, tells us about the contemporary art scene in Nigeria’s most populous city, and how the fair is addressing the climate emergency, as devastating floods wreak havoc in West Africa. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Marc Chagall’s The Falling Angel (1923/1933/1947), the centrepiece of a new exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Germany.Art X Lagos, Federal Palace, Lagos, Nigeria, 5-6 NovemberChagall: World in Turmoil, Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, Germany, until 19 February 2023 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Arts & History: ‘Winslow Homer – Force Of Nature’

Why is Winslow Homer a household name in the USA? And what makes his art so important? Follow Homer’s journey, at a time of great upheaval in American history, from magazine illustrator to sought-after artist in oil and watercolour.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature Ground Floor Galleries Until 8 January 2023

International Art: Apollo Magazine – July/Aug 2022

• The Russian artists making a stand against the war

• An interview with Gabriele Finaldi, director of the National Gallery

• The miniature marvels of Charles Paget Wade

• A Yoruba masterpiece in focus

Plus: London’s art market after Brexit, the Huntington Library comes up to speed, the beauty of banality, and reviews of Maillol’s sculptures, gilded manuscripts and Van Leo’s photographs of Cairo

Read more

Inside British Art: ‘The Red Boy’ By Thomas Lawrence

Restorer Paul Ackroyd gets ‘The Red Boy’ ready to be displayed in the Gallery.

The Red Boy, or Master Lambton, are popular names for a portrait made in 1825 by Sir Thomas Lawrence. It is officially entitled with the name of its subject, Charles William Lambton, who was the elder son of John Lambton.

Paul Ackroyd, restorer, is cleaning ‘The Red Boy’, an iconic painting by Sir Thomas Lawrence. It was so popular it was the first-ever painting to feature on a British postage stamp.

History Of Art: Albrecht Dürer’s Lasting Influence

Even if you don’t know the name, chances are you’ve seen a reproduction of one of his prints. What is it about his work that has made it last? Through paintings, drawings, prints, and letters, our exhibition ‘Dürer’s Journeys: Travels of a Renaissance Artist’ brings to life this art history megastar and the people and places he visited.

Art & Culture: History Of Indigo (National Gallery)

Our Conservation Fellow, Kendall Francis takes a closer look at indigo, a blue dye and pigment extracted from the leaves of plants, and how it is used and represented in paintings in our collection.

Kendall’s research reveals histories that are not explicitly portrayed in the paintings and highlights the important contributions from a wider range of people, including the enslaved people who cultivated the crops and extracted the indigo against their will. Supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

Tourism: World’s Most-Visited Museums In 2020

Artwork: ‘Flowers In A Terracotta Vase’ By Jan Van Huysum (1682-1749)

Lucy Chiswell, the Dorset Curatorial Fellow, explores Van Huysum’s ‘Flowers in a Terracotta Vase’ in ten minutes.

Jan van Huysum, also spelled Huijsum (15 April 1682 – 8 February 1749), was a Dutch painter.

ARTS & LITERATURE: “APOLLO MAGAZINE November 2020”

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Denzil Forrester interviewed by Gabriel CoxheadKristen Treen on Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ monuments to the American Civil War; Emilie Bickerton visits the Musée Cernuschi in Paris; Glenn Adamson defends progressive deaccessioningThomas Marks visits the Box in Plymouth; mathematician John Coates shows Susan Moore his collection of early Japanese ceramics
 
REVIEWS | Sheila McTighe on Artemisia Gentileschi at the National GallerySamuel Reilly on Michael Armitage at the Haus der Kunst; Mark Polizzotti on Matisse’s artists’ books; Emily Knight on Joseph Wright of Derby; Sameer Rahim on Islamic influences in European architecture; Anthony Cutler on the Turin Shroud
 
MARKET | A preview of the second part of Asian Art in London; and the latest art market columns from Emma Crichton-MillerSusan Moore and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Timon Screech visits the shrines of the shoguns; Gillian Darley on the enduring appeal of crescents in architecture; Damian Thompson watches Yotam Ottolenghi make a feast inspired by the court of Versailles; Thomas Marks on the vital role of education in museumsRobert O’Byrne revisits the advertisements in Apollo 40 years ago