Tag Archives: Artwork

Cocktails With A Curator: Francesco da Sangallo’s ‘St. John Baptizing’ (Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon focuses on Francesco da Sangallo’s “St. John Baptizing,” which can be found at the very center of the third floor of Frick Madison. Commissioned in the 16th century for a church in the Tuscan town of Prato, the bronze statuette has been installed atop a facsimile of the marble holy water font on which it was originally displayed, allowing visitors to see it as it was meant to be viewed. This week’s complementary cocktail is the White Negroni, a modern twist on a classic Florentine cocktail.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/sangallobaptizing

Art: ‘Hurricane Paintings’ Of Chinese-French Painter Zao Wou-Ki (1921 – 2013)

Zao Wou-Ki was a Chinese-French painter. He was a member of the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Zao Wou-Ki graduated from the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, where he studied under Fang Ganmin and Wu Dayu.

Master artist Zao Wou-Ki was one of the titans of Chinese art in the post- war period. His energetic painting ‘13.02.62’, offered in our upcoming auction Beyond Legends: Modern Art Evening Sale (18 April | Hong Kong), is from the artist’s powerful ‘Hurricane Period’ when he arrived at the pinnacle of his career. Discover how Zao perfectly fused Eastern culture with Western modernism, bringing dynamic inspiration to this work.

Art Exhibitions: ‘Anselm Kiefer – Field Of The Cloth Of Gold’ (Gagosian NYC)

For the fifth episode of Gagosian Premieres, we celebrate “Anselm Kiefer: Field of the Cloth of Gold”—a new exhibition at Gagosian, Le Bourget—with a conversation between the artist and art historian James Cuno and a debut ballet performance by Hugo Marchand and Hannah O’Neill, choreographed by Florent Melac and set to music composed by Steve Reich. The episode airs on March 23 at 2pm EDT. In this episode of Gagosian Premieres, James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, speaks to the artist in an exclusive interview about the inextricable relationship between history and place that animates the works on view. Hugo Marchand and Hannah O’Neill—principal dancer and first soloist, respectively, at the Ballet de l’Opéra national de Paris—perform original choreography by Florent Melac in the gallery. Set to Steve Reich’s “Duet,” a contemplative composition scored for two solo violins and a string ensemble, the dance was created in direct response to Kiefer’s exhibition of monumental paintings in the vast Jean Nouvel–designed former airplane hangar.

Art: ‘Dubuffet, Wols & Fautrier In Post-War Paris’

Dubuffet, Fautrier and Wols created powerful cathartic works in the aftermath of the Second World War. In this latest episode of Expert Voices, Sotheby’s specialist Haleigh Stoddard explores how all three artists translated their personal experiences on to canvas, from Fautrier’s abstract ‘Corps d’otage’ and ‘Tête d‘otage N. 15’, to Wols’ powerfully evocative ‘La Turquoise’, and Dubuffet’s vision of hope in ‘La Cavalière au Diamant’.

Jean Philippe Arthur Dubuffet was a French painter and sculptor. His idealistic approach to aesthetics embraced so-called “low art” and eschewed traditional standards of beauty in favor of what he believed to be a more authentic and humanistic approach to image-making. 

Jean Fautrier was a French painter, illustrator, printmaker, and sculptor. He was one of the most important practitioners of Tachisme. 

Wols was the pseudonym of Alfred Otto Wolfgang Schulze, a German painter and photographer predominantly active in France. Though broadly unrecognized in his lifetime, he is considered a pioneer of lyrical abstraction, one of the most influential artists of the Tachisme movement. 

The Arts: ‘Water Gilding – How It Is Done’ (V&A Video)

Water gilding is a process which makes wood look like gold. Follow the stages involved in gilding a wooden frame – from brushing on layers of gesso (glue and chalk mixture), to applying and burnishing the gold leaf.

How to make a gilded frame: Glue applied to wood: 00:27​ Gesso mixed and applied in layers: 00:34​ Gesso smoothed with dried horsetail plant: 00:46​ Details cut into the base: 00:58​ Yellow ochre pigment applied: 01:07​ Bole applied: 01:20​ Surface is smoothed with a brush: 01:29​ Water is brushed on and gold leaf is applied: 01:56​ An animal tooth is used to burnish the surface: 02:15​ Frame is coated with glue for an even finish: 02:33

Inside Views: The ‘Louvre Museum’ Masterpieces Undergo Renovation

After months of closure since the beginning of the health crisis and only a reopening for a few short months between two confinements last summer, the #Louvre​ lost 72% of attendance by 2020. But despite the absence of visitors, the heart of the #museum​ has not completely stopped beating. The Louvre is even taking advantage of this period to carry out #renovations​.

Illustrations: ‘The New Yorker Cover’ (1925-2020)

For The New Yorker’s ninety-sixth anniversary, Sergio García Sánchez draws the magazine’s trademark dandy, Eustace Tilley, masked and with a vaccine dose in hand. We also see scenes of pandemic life, and the contours of a city waiting to reëmerge.

“With masks, social distancing, and vaccines, we’ll slowly recover life in the city,” Sánchez told us. “The chance encounters with people of all cultures; the thrill of eating outside at any hour. The city is a container for so many stories, and soon they’ll be out in the open again.”

This is Sánchez’s début cover, but he isn’t the first to reimagine our mascot. When Rea Irvin, the magazine’s inaugural art editor, drew a Regency dandy for the first issue, in February, 1925, he likely wanted readers to laugh—this self-serious gentleman was a caricature of the dour, bourgeois old guard. A year later, to celebrate The New Yorker still being afloat, Irvin and the magazine’s editor, Harold Ross, decided to republish the cover, establishing an anniversary tradition that endures to this day. Tilley, of course, has changed with the times, and we’ve collected, below, a few of the ways in which artists have remade him.

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Cocktails With A Curator: ‘Piero Della Francesca’

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon explores Piero della Francesca’s “St. John the Evangelist,” one of the few major works by the Renaissance artist in the United States. This striking panel was originally part of a polyptych commissioned for the high altar of Sant’Agostino in Piero’s hometown of Borgo San Sepolcro. The polyptych was probably dismembered in the mid-16th century, less than one hundred years after it was made, and many fragments are now lost. Enjoy this week’s program with a bourbon-powered Saint cocktail or a refreshing Grapefruit Citrus mocktail.SHOW LESS

Art: ‘Rembrandt – Master Of The Dutch Golden Age’

Arguably the greatest master of the Dutch Golden Age, Rembrandt is famed for several types of works: his monumental history paintings, his self-portraits and, as beautifully exemplified by the transcendent Abraham and the Angels, his intimate biblical scenes.

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker. An innovative and prolific master in three media, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.

The Dutch Golden Age was a period in the history of the Netherlands, roughly spanning the era from 1581 to 1672, in which Dutch trade, science, and art and the Dutch military were among the most acclaimed in the world. The first section is characterized by the Eighty Years’ War, which ended in 1648.

Art: French Impressionist Berthe Morisot’s ‘Young Girl With A Basket’ (Video)

Berthe Marie Pauline Morisot was a French painter and a member of the circle of painters in Paris who became known as the Impressionists. In 1864, Morisot exhibited for the first time in the highly esteemed Salon de Paris.