Online Search: Antitrust Lawsuit Against Google Explained (WSJ Video)

The Justice Department is filing an antitrust lawsuit against Google. Here’s how the tech giant ended up in the crosshairs of federal regulators.

WSJ’s Jason Bellini reports. Photo: Getty Images

Home Tour Video: Singer Vanessa Carlton’s Stylish SoHo Factory Loft (AD)

Today Architectural Digest is welcomed downtown by Vanessa Carlton for a tour of her stylish and utilitarian SoHo loft. The one-time mercantile factory retains touches from it’s previous life, with stately brick walls and wooden columns framing rooms softened by deep couches and faux fur throws.

Vanessa is passionate about preserving the planet and always seeks to repurpose items while decorating, like the reclaimed wood shelves in her living room or the old theater lights that hang above her kitchen island. And having recently released her sixth studio album “Love Is An Art,” it’s no surprise to find a pair of pianos ready and waiting for when inspiration strikes.

Artist Profile Video: Scottish Painter Peter Doig – ‘Boiler House’ (1994)

In 1991, the Scottish artist Peter Doig (b. 1959) visited Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation in northeast France, a utopian housing project that had opened in 1961 in Briey-en-Fôret, then been abandoned.

To Doig, the project was a temple of hope laid to ruin, and the nine large-scale canvases it inspired — Doig’s seminal ‘Concrete Cabins’ series, the largest and most distinctive cycle in Doig’s oeuvre — became a meditation on the decay of Le Corbusier’s modernist vision of social cohesion.

Boiler House was first exhibited in Salzburg after Doig had won the Eliette von Karajan prize in 1994, and was included in Doig’s 2008 retrospective at Tate Britain. It stands alone within the cycle, an isolated building in the forest.

Depicting the building designed to house the estate’s coal boiler, it is rendered in fluid trails of impasto, and carries a stark anthropomorphic charge, the angular geometries looming large through a screen of trees, shifting in and out of focus like a memory or fragments from a movie reel.

Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/Bo…

Conservation Video: ‘How Farming Is Drying Up Arizona’s Water Supply’

With a lack of restrictions on water use, owners of some large-scale farms in the United States are drying up underground water tables. All they have to do is buy the land to have access to as much free water as they want. In Arizona, farm owners and ranchers are digging ever deeper to irrigate their land, leaving other residents with low water reserves. Meanwhile, parts of the land have caved in, collapsing as the water is pumped up from beneath. Our France 2 colleagues report, with FRANCE 24’s James Vasina.

Personal Technology: Comparing iPhone 12 Vs iPhone 12 Pro (WSJ Video)

To get those crazy-fast 5G speeds on Apple’s iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro, you have to find the 5G. So WSJ’s Joanna Stern set up on the field at MetLife Stadium to put the new phones — including their cameras and improved durable body — through the paces.

Energy Of The Future: ‘Powering Cities With A Virutual Power Plant’

Residential solar panels and battery backups are becoming more and more popular as efficiency rises and costs sink. This explosion in distributed solar makes a new idea possible: virtual power plants, or a smart network of individual solar panels that can act like a big power plant when electricity is needed most. And as extreme weather threatens many communities, this idea is arriving in the nick of time.

Learn more: https://www.theverge.com/e/21288017

Mountain Science: ‘Mount Everest Weather – Data Is In The Clouds’ (Video)

In 2019, members of the National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition set out to install five new weather stations on Mt. Everest, including the highest weather station on Earth. Follow along as the team climbs into the mountain’s “death zone” to complete the network of weather stations in order to improve our understanding of climate change.

Infographic: ‘What Is Herd Immunity?’ – Achieving It With Covid-19 (JAMA)

OCTOBER 19, 2020

What Is Herd Immunity?

Herd immunity occurs when a significant portion of a population becomes immune to an infectious disease, limiting further disease spread.

Disease spread occurs when some proportion of a population is susceptible to the disease. Herd immunity occurs when a significant portion of a population becomes immune to an infectious disease and the risk of spread from person to person decreases; those who are not immune are indirectly protected because ongoing disease spread is very small.

The proportion of a population who must be immune to achieve herd immunity varies by disease. For example, a disease that is very contagious, such as measles, requires more than 95% of the population to be immune to stop sustained disease transmission and achieve herd immunity.

How Is Herd Immunity Achieved?

Herd immunity may be achieved either through infection and recovery or by vaccination. Vaccination creates immunity without having to contract a disease. Herd immunity also protects those who are unable to be vaccinated, such as newborns and immunocompromised people, because the disease spread within the population is very limited. Communities with lower vaccine coverage may have outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases because the proportion of people who are vaccinated is below the necessary herd immunity threshold. In addition, the protection offered by vaccines may wane over time, requiring repeat vaccination.

Achieving herd immunity through infection relies on enough people being infected with the disease and recovering from it, during which they develop antibodies against future infection. In some situations, even if a large proportion of adults have developed immunity after prior infection, the disease may still circulate among children. In addition, antibodies from a prior infection may only provide protection for a limited duration.

People who do not have immunity to a disease may still contract an infectious disease and have severe consequences of that disease even when herd immunity is very high. Herd immunity reduces the risk of getting a disease but does not prevent it for nonimmune people.

Herd Immunity and COVID-19

There is no effective vaccine against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) yet, although several are currently in development. It is not yet known if having this disease confers immunity to future infection, and if so, for how long. A large proportion of people would likely need to be infected and recover to achieve herd immunity; however, this situation could overwhelm the health care system and lead to many deaths and complications. To prevent disease transmission, keep distance between yourself and others, wash your hands often with soap and water or sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, and wear a face covering in public spaces where it is difficult to avoid close contact with others.

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Top New Travel Videos: ‘Early Morning Fog’ Near Laterina In Tuscany, Italy

Filmed and Edited by: Mark Soetebier

Early morning fog in Tuscany around Laterina and Pratomagno, Italy.

Laterina is a frazione of Laterina Pergine Valdarno in the Province of Arezzo in the Italian region Tuscany, located about 50 kilometres (31 mi) southeast of Florence and about 14 kilometres (9 mi) northwest of Arezzo.

Morning News Podcast: Final Presidential Debate, Stimulus Bill, Health Care

Presidential candidates’ microphones to be muted in parts of final debate, Pelosi, Mnuchin work to reach deal before Tuesday deadline, and this 14-year-old girl won a $25K prize for a discovery that could lead to a cure for Covid-19.