New Photography Books: “America – 1900” (Taschen)

These rediscovered Photochrom and Photostint postcard images from the private collection of Marc Walter were produced by the Detroit Photographic Company between 1888 and 1924. Using a photolithographic process that predated the autochrome by nearly 20 years, they offered people the very first color photographs of the United States.

Suddenly, the continent’s colors were available for all to see. From the rich ochres and browns of the Grand Canyon to the dazzle of Atlantic City, these places were now a visual delight not only for eyewitnesses but for Americans far and wide.

Imbued with a sense of discovery and adventure, the pictures gathered here are a voyage through peoples, places, and time. They take us through North America’s vast and varied landscape, where we encounter its many communities, and above all transport us back to the United States of over a century ago. Across more than 600 pages including fold-out spreads, this sweeping panorama takes us from Native American settlements to New York’s Chinatown, from some of the last cowboys to Coney Island’s heyday. As luminous now as they were some 120 years ago, these rare and remarkable images that brought America to Americans now bring America’s past to our present.

The authors

Graphic designer, photographer, and collector Marc Walter (1949–2018) specialized in vintage travel photographs, particularly photochromes, of which he held one of the world’s largest collections. He published numerous books featuring images from his collection as well as his own photographs.

Sabine Arqué is a photo researcher, editor, and author. She has collaborated on numerous publications on the themes of travel, the history of tourism, photochromes, and photography.

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Top Art History Podcasts: “Michelangelo’s Drawings – Mind Of The Master”

Michelangelo is among the most influential and impressive artists of the Italian High Renaissance. His lifelike sculptures and powerful paintings are some of the most recognizable works in Western art history. He also drew prolifically, making sketch after sketch of figures in slightly varying poses, focusing on form and gesture.

However, remarkably few of these drawings remain today, many of them burned by the artist himself, others lost or damaged over the centuries.

A recent exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Michelangelo: Mind of the Master, brought together more than two dozen of Michelangelo’s surviving drawings—including designs for the Sistine Chapel ceiling and The Last Judgment—to shed light on the artist’s creativity and working method. In this episode, co-curators of this exhibition, Julian Brooks and Edina Adam, discuss the master and what we can learn from his works on paper.

For images, transcripts, and more, visit getty.edu/podcasts.

New Podcast Interviews: “Fever-Tree” Tonic Mixer CEO Tim Warrillow

Monocle 24’s “The Entrepreneurs”: Tim Warrillow is the co-founder and CEO of Fever-Tree, the premium drinks and mixers brand he launched with Charles Rolls in 2005. As you’ll hear, the pair went to the ends of the Earth to find the best ingredients possible.

Plus: Black Tomato co-founder, Tom Marchant, discusses the future of luxury travel.

Art History Video: The “Birth Of Impressionism – Monet’s Lost Sunrise”

The theft and recovery of Claude Monet’s Sunrise, the painting that began the impressionist movement.

Impression, Sunrise is a painting by Claude Monet first shown at what would become known as the “Exhibition of the Impressionists” in Paris in April, 1874. The painting is credited with inspiring the name of the Impressionist movement. Impression, Sunrise depicts the port of Le Havre, Monet’s hometown.

Top New Science Podcasts: 3D Printed Aerogels, Covid-19 Data & Sulfur

In this Nature podcast: a new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, the countries that collect Covid-19 data effectively, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids.

In this episode:

01:05 Printing aerogels

Aerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common form of aerogel, opening up a range of potential new applications. Research Article: Zhao et al.

07:00 Coronapod

To provide targeted public health interventions during the pandemic, it’s vital that data are collected and shared effectively. We discuss the countries doing this well, and find out how fragmented systems are preventing epidemiologists from giving up-to-date information on outbreaks.

21:11 Research Highlights

Fats in the blood as a possible marker of autism, and the selfish component to solar panel adoption. Research Highlight: Fats in the blood linked to autismResearch Highlight: Self-interest powers decision to go solar

23:24 Liquid-liquid transitions

It’s been thought that some liquids may be able to exist in two distinct states, but evidence has been scarce. Now, researchers show that sulfur can exist in two liquid states, and have discovered some insights into how this might occur. Research Article: Henry et al.Video: 24 hours in a synchrotron

30:09 Briefing Chat

We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss the English language’s dominance in science, and how to make squid transparent. Symmetry: Physics in a second languageOneZero: The First Gene-Edited Squid in History Is a Biological Breakthrough

Top New Travel Videos: “Barcelona In 24 Hours”

Barcelona is one of the world’s main tourist destinations, as well as Europe’s cultural, financial, and transport hub. With a rich history and great location, there’s a lot to explore. In this video, we created an itinerary, ideal for a one-day visit to Barcelona, Spain. And at the end of this video, we also included some great tips to organize yourself before you go.

Travel & Exploration: The Secrets Of “Mayan Pyramid El Castillo” (NatGeo Video)

Two National Geographic Explorers enter the Mayan Pyramid, El Castillo, in search of a hidden entrance to an underground cave. While inside they explain the significance of jaguar throne and human sacrifice.

Travels With A Curator: “Grasse” In The South Of France (The Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” journey to Grasse on the French Riviera with Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon as he explores the birthplace of Jean-Honoré Fragonard and the Villa-Musée Fragonard. Once a private residence owned by Fragonard’s cousin, Alexandre Maubert, the villa was home to the Frick’s beloved “Progress of Love” series for about 100 years before the paintings were sold and eventually acquired by Henry Clay Frick in the early 20th century.

Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French painter and printmaker whose late Rococo manner was distinguished by remarkable facility, exuberance, and hedonism. One of the most prolific artists active in the last decades of the Ancien Régime, Fragonard produced more than 550 paintings, of which only five are dated.