Tag Archives: Frick Collection

Travels With A Curator: Santa Maria Della Scala In Siena (The Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” Xavier F. Salomon, Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, journeys to Siena to explore Santa Maria della Scala, an eleventh-century complex across from the steps of the cathedral. Behind the modest exterior of this hospital turned museum are a variety of magnificent frescoes and sculptures by Lorenzo di Pietro, better known as Vecchietta. The Frick’s “Resurrection” is the only signed and dated work by the artist in the United States.

Cocktails with a Curator: Hans Holbein’s ‘Sir Thomas More’ Of 1527 (Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Xavier F. Salomon, Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, examines one of the Frick’s most beloved paintings, Hans Holbein’s “Sir Thomas More.” Xavier considers More’s relationship to humanist circles and the role of “friendship portraits” in making the absent present. In the words of More’s devoted friend, Desiderius Erasmus, “life without a friend is no life.” As a nod to the turbulent times of Tudor England, Xavier pairs this episode with a Bloody Mary cocktail.

Travels With A Curator: “Japanese Palace Dresden” (Frick Collection Video)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” Xavier F. Salomon, Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, transports us to the Japanisches Palais (Japanese Palace) in Dresden, the original home of the Meissen “Great Bustard.” Augustus II rebuilt and enlarged the Japanese Palace to showcase his extraordinary collection of porcelain, but he died before the project was completed. This exquisite porcelain masterpiece became part of the Frick’s collection through the generosity of the late collector Henry H. Arnhold (1921–2018).

 

Cocktails With A Curator: “Stubb’s ‘Portrait Of Warren Hastings’ (Frick)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” join Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon as he considers the life of statesman Warren Hastings, who is depicted in a small watercolor from about 1791 by the prominent British artist George Stubbs. Explore the tumultuous career of Hastings, from his tenure as governor-general of India to a decade-long trial in Westminster Hall upon his return to England. This week’s complementary cocktail is a gin and tonic garnished with a slice of lime.

Travels With A Curator: “Valenciennes”, Northern France (The Frick Videos)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” travel with Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, to Valenciennes, the birthplace of the Rococo painter Jean-Antoine Watteau. Delve into the historical events surrounding Watteau’s “Portal at Valenciennes” (ca. 1710–11), a scene of soldiers at rest near the ramparts of the town. Known for his depictions of garden frolics, Watteau seldom portrayed military life—“The Portal” is one of only three such paintings that survive today.

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Valenciennes is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. It lies on the Scheldt river. Although the city and region experienced a steady population decline between 1975 and 1990, it has since rebounded.

Art: “Audrey Munson” – The First “Supermodel” In American History (Video)

The year 2020 marks the one-hundredth anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted millions of women in the U.S. the right to vote. The Frick is celebrating with a series of videos honoring the stories of women who made, appeared in, collected, and took care of art in this collection.

Frick Curator Aimee Ng continues the series with a look at the model, actress, dancer, writer, and artist known as “Miss Manhattan”—Audrey Munson. 

Audrey Marie Munson was an American artist’s model and film actress, today considered “America’s First Supermodel.” In her time, she was variously known as “Miss Manhattan”, the “Panama–Pacific Girl”, the “Exposition Girl” and “American Venus.”

Cocktails With A Curator: “Gainsborough’s ‘Grace Dalrymple Elliott'” (Video)

The Frick Collection logoIn this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng studies Thomas Gainsborough’s scandalous portrait of Grace Dalrymple Elliott. Discover why this painting met with a negative reception when it was shown at the Royal Academy in 1782. Mrs. Elliott later moved to France, where she lived through the Reign of Terror and died in 1823 in the outskirts of Paris. This week’s complementary cocktail is the Pimm’s Cup, a traditional summer drink in Britain.

Thomas Gainsborough RA FRSA was an English portrait and landscape painter, draughtsman, and printmaker. Along with his rival Sir Joshua Reynolds, he is considered one of the most important British artists of the second half of the 18th century.

Cocktails With A Curator: Whistler’s ‘Mrs. Frances Leyland'” (The Frick Video)

 

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” join Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, as he explores “Symphony in Flesh Color and Pink: Portrait of Mrs. Frances Leyland” by James McNeill Whistler. Delve into the tumultuous history of Whistler’s relationship with Frederick Richards Leyland, the shipping magnate who commissioned the painting, as well as the painter’s affinity for Japanese culture. This week’s complementary cocktail is a Sake Highball on the rocks.

Travels With A Curator: “Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon” (Video)

In this episode of “Travels with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng takes viewers on a journey to Lisbon’s Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, the home of an extraordinary private collection that, like the Frick, was made available for the enjoyment of the public after the collector’s death. This is a museum about discovery and movement, a place of marvelous encounters between the Old Masters and modernist architecture. Peek inside this spectacular museum—you may recognize a certain marble sculpture whose terracotta sister resides at the Frick.

 

Cocktails With A Curator: Barbet’s ‘Angel’ (The Frick)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” discover the fascinating history of Jean Barbet’s Angel, an incredibly rare bronze from fifteenth-century France whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, discusses the royal cannon-maker who cast the sculpture and the possibility that it once resided in Paris’s Sainte-Chapelle. This week’s complementary cocktail is the Angel Face, customarily garnished with an apple slice.

To see this bronze sculpture in detail, please visit our website: https://collections.frick.org/objects/35