Tag Archives: America

Fast Food: How Chicken Took Over America (CNBC)

Chick-fil-A has long dominated the chicken sandwich category in fast food. After Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen launched its own version of the chicken sandwich, other fast food chains like Wendy’s, McDonalds and Shake Shack got into the battle. Here’s how chicken took over America.

Covers: France-Amérique Magazine – January 2022

Travel: Ten Best Road Trips In The World (Condé Nast)

Our list of the 10 best road trips in the world covers everything from Alpine mountain passes and arid desert drives in western America, to lush forests in Japan and India, and the rugged coastlines of Norway and Scotland

Blue Ridge Parkway, USA

Afton to Cherokee, 469 miles (755km)

Just over three hours southwest of Washington DC lies the start of the most phenomenal scenic byway that carves its way through the lush, mountainous forests of Virginia and North Carolina

Great St Bernard Pass, Italy

Turin, Italy to Montreux, Switzerland, 143 miles (230km)

For movie fans, this road is a must-drive after it was immortalised in the iconic opening scene of the original Italian Job, starring Michael Caine. The film opens with a Lamborghini Muria dancing its way over the Great St Bernard Pass, which, aside from a few safety improvements, is still as unspoilt and spectacular as it was back in 1969. 

The Carretera Austral, Chile

Puerto Montt to Villa O’Higgins 770 miles (1240km)

Patagonia is a place that should appear on everyone’s bucket list. This remote, pre-historic wilderness is made of mountains, lakes, forests and fjords, which can all be absorbed from the comfort of a car driving down Chile‘s Southern Highway (Route 7) – the ‘Carretera Austral’. 

The North Coast 500, Scotland

Inverness to Inverness loop around Scotland’s coastline, 516 miles (830km)

One of the best road trips the United Kingdom has to offer is the North Coast 500. As the name suggests, the 500-mile route loops its way around Scotland‘s rugged northern coastline, taking in everything from white sandy beaches to mountains and remote fishing villages. 

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Politics: What America Will Fight For, British PM Grounded, China Olympics

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what would America fight for? Also, why two years after a famous election victory, Boris Johnson’s would-be radical administration has run into the ground (09:20). And we explore how Beijing’s Winter Olympics may hasten China’s break with the West (17:10).

Politics: How America Counters China, Merkel Exits Germany, Nigeria

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the mess Merkel leaves behind, America gets serious about countering China (11:01) and Nigerian megachurches practise the prosperity they preach (17:36).

Morning News: America’s Vaccine Mandate, Cities Shift & Ancient Finland

President Joe Biden’s requirements for employers to insist on vaccinations are a bold move amid flatlining inoculation rates. But will they work?

For decades the world’s cities seemed invincible, but the pandemic has hastened and hardened a shift in urban demographics and economics. And an ancient Finnish burial site scrambles notions of gender roles in the distant past.

Analysis: Is America In Another Housing Bubble?

Home prices in the U.S. have climbed at a record pace during the pandemic. The median home price reached over $363,000 in June 2021, a 23.4% increase from 2020. Many of the houses are being sold above their asking price, often entirely in cash with bidding wars becoming the new norm to weed out the competition. So is America currently in another housing bubble and what are the signs that can help investors predict an oncoming crash?

Political Analysis: China’s Attack On Tech, America Functions, German Voting

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: China’s attack on tech, function in Washington (10:09), and our prediction model for Germany’s election (17:15) 

1950’s: A ‘Moral Panic’ That Targeted Comic Books

Comic books have been a staple of American pop culture for the better part of 90 years. The origin story of comics as we know them, however, is much more complicated. In the 1950s, a moral panic swept across the country — one in which parents and children burned comic books by the bushel in public gatherings — and led to the near destruction of the comic book industry. Comics were big business even by the 1940s. They reached millions of readers each week. And the superheroes created then have now become billion-dollar franchises, showcased in blockbuster films and massive conventions such as Comic-Con. Events in 1954, however, almost changed that. Laws were passed. Careers were ruined. And comics fell under a strict censorship regime that lasted for decades to come.