Tag Archives: Mexico

Views: Whale Sharks Off Coast Of Cancun, Mexico

CBS Sunday Morning – We leave you this Sunday morning with whale sharks near Holbox Island off the coast of Cancun, in Mexico. Videographer: Lance Milbrand.

As the largest fish in the sea, reaching lengths of 40 feet or more, whale sharks have an enormous menu from which to choose. Fortunately for most sea-dwellers—and us!—their favorite meal is plankton. They scoop these tiny plants and animals up, along with any small fish that happen to be around, with their colossal gaping mouths while swimming close to the water’s surface.

Filter Feeding

The whale shark, like the world’s second largest fish, the basking shark, is a filter feeder. In order to eat, the beast juts out its formidably sized jaws and passively filters everything in its path. The mechanism is theorized to be a technique called “cross-flow filtration,” similar to some bony fish and baleen whales.

Mexican Travel Tours: Mexico City To Sonora

DW Travel – Follow DW’s Lukas Stege as he travels through Mexico, the country he considers his second home. On his first big trip here many years ago, he learned Spanish, made many friends and found his calling as a journalist. Lukas visits the metropolis of Mexico City, millennia-old pyramids and beaches of Sonora.

360° View Travel: Cancun In Southwestern Mexico

AirPano VR – Cancún, a Mexican city on the Yucatán Peninsula bordering the Caribbean Sea, is known for its beaches, numerous resorts and nightlife. It’s composed of 2 distinct areas: the more traditional downtown area, El Centro, and Zona Hotelera, a long, beachfront strip of high-rise hotels, nightclubs, shops and restaurants. Cancun is also a famed destination for students during universities’ spring break period. 

Mexico Archaeology: Lost Sak Tz’i’ Dynasty Unveiled

National Geographic UK – Modern technology has enabled archaeologists to virtually peel back a forest to discover the lost Maya city, an ancient civilisation that existed for up to 3,000 years and stretched from the pacific coast to the gulf coast of Mexico.

The technology, known as LIDAR, shot lasers from a plane through the tree canopy which bounced off of the ground to create an image of the earth below. The images were then used to map and uncover the hidden historical structures that make up the ancient Maya city.

According to a report in The New York Times, a fortified Maya settlement thought to be the capital of the Sak Tz’i’ dynasty is being investigated on private land in southern Mexico by a team of researchers including Charles Golden of Brandeis University. The site is thought to have been occupied as early as 750 B.C. until the end of the Classic period, around A.D. 900.

Golden said that the ruins cover about 100 acres and include an acropolis dominated by a 45-foot-tall pyramid, temples, plazas, reception halls, a palace, ceremonial centers, and a ball court measuring about 350 feet long by 16 feet wide. Inscriptions from other sites had linked the kingdom of Sak Tz’i’ to the Maya cities of Piedras Negras, Bonampak, Palenque, Tonina, and Yaxchilan.

Engineering: Why Mexico Has So Few Tall Buildings

The B1M – TAKE a look at Mexico’s cities and you might spot some similarities.

You’ll see it’s a country that clearly knows a thing or two about urban sprawl, with hardly a skyscraper in sight. But look closely and you’ll find that skyscrapers do exist, just not really in any great numbers.

That’s because it’s one of the toughest places on Earth to build tall and engineers must grapple with the extremes of the elements, unforgiving ground conditions, congestion and the absence of some key resources.

Now though, after decades of building outwards instead of upwards, skyscrapers in Mexico are seriously on the rise and construction crews are managing to meet some immense challenges.

Aerial Views: Yucatán In Southeastern Mexico (4K)

Yucatánestado (state), southeastern Mexico. Occupying part of the northern Yucatán Peninsula, it is bounded to the north by the Gulf of Mexico, to the east and southeast by the state of Quintana Roo, and to the southwest and west by the state of Campeche. The state capital and chief commercial centre is Mérida.

The state’s relief includes coastal wetlands, semiarid hills and plains, and limestone lowlands dotted with cenotes (water-filled sinkholes). In pre-Hispanic times the peninsula was an Olmec and Maya cultural hearth, as evidenced by the monumental ruins of Chichén Itzá and Uxmal; each has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, in 1988 and 1996, respectively. Among the other numerous ruined cities are Chumul, Ek Balam, and Sayil. Strong resistance to the Spanish conquest lasted in the area from 1527 until the 1540s. Yucatán occupied the entire peninsula when it became a state in 1824, but following a series of insurrections, its territory was reduced with the loss of Campeche in 1857 (ratified in 1858) and Quintana Roo in 1902. Later boundary changes reduced the state to its present size.

News: Indonesia’s Widodo, Russia-Ukraine, France Exits Mali, Mexico Cartels

As Indonesia celebrates its independence day, we discuss President Joko Widodo’s plan to act as a diplomatic bridge between Russia and Ukraine. Plus: French troops officially leave Mali, cartel-driven violence in Mexico and the latest aviation news.

Views: Puerto Vallarta In Western Mexico (4K)

Puerto Vallarta is a resort town on Mexico’s Pacific coast, in Jalisco state. It is known for its beaches, water sports and nightlife scene. Its cobblestone center is home to the ornate Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe church, boutique shops and a range of restaurants and bars. El Malecón is a beachside promenade with contemporary sculptures, as well as bars, lounges and nightclubs.

Cover Previews: World Archaeology – Aug 2022

Below the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico lies a submerged world of extraordinary beauty. Caves once created a subterranean labyrinth that the earliest human settlers seemingly associated with magic. After these passageways flooded at the end of the last Ice Age, they created reservoirs that proved essential for the success of Maya cities. Now a fascinating project is revealing the remarkable range of archaeology preserved in this underworld.

Goddesses and spiritual beings also display an impressive range, in this case of powers. There can be a tendency for modern audiences to focus on a single attribute – Venus as the goddess of love, for instance – but this obscures the remarkable breadth of gifts they could bestow on worshippers. An exhibition examining the nature of feminine power provides an opportunity to consider the divine and the demonised.

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Morning News: Southern Ukraine Strategy, Missing In Mexico, Friendly Smells

The city remains Ukraine’s only provincial capital to be taken by Russian forces—can Ukraine overcome its shortages of manpower and firepower to retake the province?

Mexico’s official missing-persons list has topped 100,000; our correspondent describes the skyrocketing total and piecemeal efforts to slow its rise. And research suggests that people choose their friends at least in part by smell