TOP TRAVEL VIDEOS: “AERIAL AMERICA – TENNESSEE” (SMITHSONIAN CHANNEL)

Join us as we soar high above Tennessee, the Volunteer State, journeying over the majestic Appalachian Mountains and the mighty Mississippi River, to see its natural beauty – rugged, inviting and infused with the spirit of a nation.
From the Series: Aerial America: Tennessee http://bit.ly/2yz9GdU

Top New Science Podcasts: Pregnancy Risks Of Covid-19, Razor Blades & Hair

science-magazine-podcastsStaff Writer Meredith Wadman joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the risk of the novel coronavirus infection to pregnant women. Early data suggest expectant women are more likely to get severe forms of the infection and require hospitalization. Meredith describes how the biology of pregnancy—such as changes to the maternal immune system and added stress on the heart and lungs—might explain the harsher effects of the virus.

Also this week, Sarah talks with Gianluca Roscioli about his experiments with commercial razor blades and real human hair. By using a scanning electron microscope, he was able to show how something relatively soft like hair is able to damage something 50 times harder like stainless steel.

New Home Design Books: “Life Meets Art” (Phaidon)

An inspiring collection of the extraordinary private spaces of 250 of the world’s most creative people, past and present

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Life Meets Art is an unparalleled behind-the-scenes tour of some of the most fascinating, inspirational and unique home interiors in the world. The living spaces of hundreds of the globe’s most talented people in the spheres of art, design, fashion, literature, music, and film, here provide inspiration for anyone fascinated by stylish living, creative interior design and the myriad possibilities for home decor. It’s a fascinating glimpse into the homes of some of the greatest creatives in history — painters, sculptors, novelists, poets, fashion designers, composers, musicians, architects, and more.

AUTHOR: Sam Lubell has written eight books about architecture, including California Captured and two travel guides to mid-century modern architecture in the USA, all from Phaidon. He is a contributing editor at The Architect’s Newspaper and writes for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic, Architectural Record, Architectural Review, and other publications.

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Classic Cars: “1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe”(Video)

Turn your volume all the way up and watch as RM Sotheby’s Car Specialist Barney Ruprecht takes the stunning and rare 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Pinin Farina for a cruise on the open road. Combining brisk performance with distinctive styling, the unique chassis no. 1433 GT, the 185th of 353 examples built, sports numerous bespoke details, including chromed door sills and a 410 Superamerica-style air intake on the hood. Fitted with its original numbers-matching engine, 1433 GT is among the finest available, accompanied by the lauded Ferrari Classiche certification and finished in elegant colors of Blu with an Argento roof making it truly one of a kind.

Top Artists Profiles: Illustrator Gabriella Marsh – “Sublime Lines”

Gabriella Marsh is a freelance designer, illustrator and animator based in London. She loves drawing, painting and all things hand rendered so all work begins on paper before being set on the computer, tidied up and make to move. She is currently at the Royal College of Art doing an MA in experimental animation.

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Infographics: “Reducing Salt In Diet & Foods To Improve Blood Pressure”

Tip To Improve Blood Pressure - Infographic - Eufic

Does reducing salt improve our blood pressure?

There is consistent evidence that moderate reductions (i.e. a decrease of 3 to 5 g or ½ to 1 teaspoon a day) in salt intake can lead to a reduction in blood pressure.5,6 However, these effects may not be the same for everyone and will depend on an individual’s starting blood pressure (greater benefits are seen in those with higher blood pressure), their current level of salt intake, genetics, disease status and medication use.

It is important to note that salt is not the only lifestyle factor that can influence our blood pressure. Other factors such as eating enough potassium, maintaining a healthy body weight, not smoking, and being physically active are also important when it comes to reducing blood pressure. You can find 7 lifestyle tips to help reduce blood pressure here.

High salt foods:

  • Processed meats such as bacon, salami, sausages and ham
  • Cheeses
  • Gravy granules, stock cubes, yeast extracts
  • Olives, pickles and other pickled foods
  • Salted and dry-roasted nuts and crisps
  • Salted and smoked meat and fish
  • Sauces: soy sauce, ketchup, mayonnaise, BBQ sauce

How Much Salt Is Too Much Salt - Infographic Eufic

What is salt?

Salt is the common name for sodium chloride (or NaCl). It consists of 40% sodium and 60% chloride. In other words, 2.5 g of salt contains 1 g of sodium and 1.5 g of chloride.

Why do we need salt?

Both sodium and chloride are essential for many body functions. They help regulate blood pressure, control fluid balance, maintain the right conditions for muscle and nerve function and allow for the absorption and transport of nutrients across cell membranes. Chloride is also used to produce stomach acid (hydrochloric acid, HCl) which helps us digest foods.

How much salt do we need per day?

The exact minimum daily requirement for salt is unknown, but it is thought to be around 1.25 g – 2.5 g (0.5 – 1 g sodium) per day.1 As salt is found in a large variety of foods the risk of deficiency is low.1,2 The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has stated that a salt intake of 5 g per day (equivalent to 2 g of sodium) is sufficient to meet both our sodium and chloride requirements as well as reduce our risk of high blood pressure and heart disease.1,2 This is equivalent to around 1 teaspoon of salt per day from all sources.

Both sodium and chloride are released from our body through our urine and when we sweat. This means bouts of heavy sweating such as during exercise can increase our salt requirements slightly. However, as most people consume well above required levels it is usually not necessary to increase salt intake during these conditions.1

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