Tag Archives: Art Videos

Artistry: ‘The Lore Of Fabergé Eggs’ (Video)

In the era of the Russian tsars, Peter Carl Fabergé’s jewel-studded objets d’art were a royal riff on a much humbler Easter tradition of ordinary folk giving each other colored hens’ eggs. Correspondent Elizabeth Palmer reports on the lore of Fabergé eggs, from opulent originals to sparkling counterfeits.

The celebrated series of 50 Imperial Easter eggs was created for the Russian Imperial family from 1885 to 1916 when the company was run by Peter Carl Fabergé. These creations are inextricably linked to the glory and tragic fate of the last Romanov family. They were the ultimate achievement of the renowned Russian jewellery house and must also be considered the last great commissions of objets d’art . Ten eggs were produced from 1885 to 1893, during the reign of Emperor Alexander III; 40 more were created during the rule of his dutiful son, Nicholas II, two each year, one for his mother, the dowager, the second for his wife.

Art Exhibitions: ‘Anselm Kiefer – Field Of The Cloth Of Gold’ (Gagosian NYC)

For the fifth episode of Gagosian Premieres, we celebrate “Anselm Kiefer: Field of the Cloth of Gold”—a new exhibition at Gagosian, Le Bourget—with a conversation between the artist and art historian James Cuno and a debut ballet performance by Hugo Marchand and Hannah O’Neill, choreographed by Florent Melac and set to music composed by Steve Reich. The episode airs on March 23 at 2pm EDT. In this episode of Gagosian Premieres, James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, speaks to the artist in an exclusive interview about the inextricable relationship between history and place that animates the works on view. Hugo Marchand and Hannah O’Neill—principal dancer and first soloist, respectively, at the Ballet de l’Opéra national de Paris—perform original choreography by Florent Melac in the gallery. Set to Steve Reich’s “Duet,” a contemplative composition scored for two solo violins and a string ensemble, the dance was created in direct response to Kiefer’s exhibition of monumental paintings in the vast Jean Nouvel–designed former airplane hangar.

The Arts: ‘The Underwater Museum Of Cannes’ (Video)

Six large sculptures of fractured human faces form the underwater museum that British sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor has created off the coast of Cannes, France. The Underwater Museum of Cannes is a permanent installation beside the island of Sainte-Marguerite that is intended to “draw more people underwater” to engage with marine life. It is designed by deCaires Taylor to be highly accessible by either snorkelling or diving, positioned two and three metres below sea level. The goal is that visitors will “foster a sense of care” for marine life and better appreciate its value, while oceans environments are continually threatened by human activity.

Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1619810​

Exhibition Tours: ‘Goya’s Graphic Imagination’

Mark McDonald, Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints, takes us on a virtual tour of Goya’s Graphic Imagination to explore how Goya’s drawings and prints allowed him to share his complex ideas and respond to the turbulent social and political changes occurring in the world around him.

Artwork: ‘The Harvesters’ By Dutch Renaissance Painter Pieter Bruegel The Elder, 1525-1569 (Video)

Artist: Pieter Bruegel the Elder (Netherlandish, Breda ca. 1525–1569 Brussels) Title: The Harvesters

The Harvesters is an oil painting on wood completed by Pieter Bruegel the Elder in 1565. It depicts the harvest time, in the months of July and August or late summer. Nicolaes Jonghelinck, a merchant banker and art collector from Antwerp, commissioned this painting.

On view at Metropolitan Museum: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collect…

Pieter Bruegel the Elder was the most significant artist of Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting, a painter and printmaker, known for his landscapes and peasant scenes; he was a pioneer in making both types of subject the focus in large paintings.

Cocktails With A Curator: Lawrence’s ‘Lady Peel’

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the history behind Sir Thomas Lawrence’s celebrated portrait of Julia, Lady Peel. When it was shown at the Royal Academy, in 1827, this painting was hailed as Sir Thomas’s greatest portrait—and one of the great works of modern art at the time.

It’s easy to see why: the sitter projects authority, confidence, and ease despite her flamboyant, over-the-top outfit. Sir Thomas’s depiction of Lady Peel is closely related to Peter Paul Rubens’s famous “Chapeau de Paille,” which had recently entered the collection of her husband, Sir Robert Peel. In recognition of the lavish bracelets and rings worn by the sitter, this week’s complementary cocktail is the Bijou (French for “jewel”).

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/ladypeel

Top Art Exhibitions: ‘Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera And Mexican Modernism’ (2020)

“Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection” is on view at the Denver Art Museum through January 24, 2021.

Artwork: Claude Monet’s ‘Japanese Footbridge And Water Lily Pool, Giverny’

Often called the Father of Impressionism, Claude Monet inspired the term that defined this movement. Born in Paris, Monet would later live in Giverny, where he purchased a property, planted sprawling gardens, and painted his famous water lilies. https://www.philamuseum.org/collectio…

Ancient Arts: ‘Lost-Wax Bronze Casting’ (Video)

See the process involved in casting a bronze figure – from the creation of a wax model through to the final sculpture. Find out more about sculpture: https://www.vam.ac.uk/collections/scu…