Tag Archives: National Geographic Videos

Views: ‘United Kingdom’s National Parks In 100 Seconds’ (Aerial Video)

What do the UK’s National Parks really look like? To see what these landscapes are made-up of, let’s go on a walk. Each second of the walk reveals 1% of our National Parks and how they appear from above. Are you ready for the UK’s national parks in 100 seconds?

Science & Wildlife: ‘The Bird Genoscape Project’

Billions of birds migrate annually across the Western Hemisphere… but if we don’t know where they go when they leave their breeding grounds, how can we protect them? By extracting DNA from individual feathers (and borrowing cutting-edge technology from the Human Genome Project) scientists can map bird migration with greater precision than ever before. The result is the Bird Genoscape Project, and it’s revolutionizing bird conservation by connecting migratory birds – and the people who care about them – across the Americas. This work was funded by the National Geographic Society. Learn more at http://www.natgeo.org.

Archaeology: ‘Legends Of Atlantis’ (NatGeo Video)

Exciting evidence emerges of civilizations lost for centuries under the waves, from mysterious underwater pyramids off the coast of Japan to the fabled city of Atlantis itself. Using cutting-edge graphics to reveal what’s actually lying on the seafloor, and insight from the world’s top marine archaeologists, Drain the Oceans finds the answers.

History: Romania’s ‘Vlad The Impaler’ (Video)

Vlad Tepes, also known as Vlad the Impaler, and even more infamously known as Dracula defended Romania against the Ottoman Empire in some of the most horrific ways imaginable. His hatred and desire for revenge left lasting effects on the world and in popular culture. What are the facts that inspired the fiction?

Vlad III, most commonly known as Vlad the Impaler or Vlad Dracula, was Voivode of Wallachia three times between 1448 and his death. He is often considered one of the most important rulers in Wallachian history and a national hero of Romania.

Health: Side Effects Of ‘Steroids & Performance-Enhancing Drugs’ (Video)

Heart failure or other heart complications are often brought on by steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs. A former bodybuilder tells his story and begins the road to recovery.

America’s National Parks: ‘Yellowstone’ – National Geographic (Video)

Few places are as special and unique as Yellowstone National Park – the world’s first national park. A wilderness jewel of vast forests and wide-open valleys, home to large bison herds, wolf packs, and grizzly bears. It sits atop one of the world’s largest super volcanoes, giving rise to such iconic geothermal features as Old Faithful geyser and the Grand Prismatic Spring.

Travel & Adventure: Cara Delevingne & Bear Grylls In Sardinia, Italy (Video)

Cara Delevingne realizes a dream of accompanying Bear Grylls on an adventure. Sweeping Cara off her scooter and into a helicopter, Bear leads Cara up the mountains of Sardinia. At nearly a mile high in elevation, Bear shows Cara how to brave several heart-stopping obstacles, including pulling herself across a horizontal line suspended 200 feet in the air and rappelling down a dangerous waterfall.

Sardinia is a large Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea. It has nearly 2,000km of coastline, sandy beaches and a mountainous interior crossed with hiking trails. Its rugged landscape is dotted with thousands of nuraghi – mysterious Bronze Age stone ruins shaped like beehives. One of the largest and oldest nuraghi is Su Nuraxi in Barumini, dating to 1500 B.C.

Thailand: ‘Blowguns Of The Mani Tribe’ (Video)

Hazen travels to the Malay Peninsula and meets with members of the Mani tribe, a group of hunter-gathers who have lived for the land for centuries. Hazen learns how to use their trademark tool for hunting, the blowgun.

The Maniq or Mani are an ethnic group of Thailand. They are more widely known in Thailand as the Sakai (Thai: ซาไก), a controversial derogatory term meaning ‘slave’ or ‘barbarism’.[2] They are the only Negrito group in Thailand and speak a variety of related Aslian languages, primarily Kensiu and Ten’edn. The Lisu have their own language, culture, and no alphabet.[3]

In Thailand, the Maniq minority live in the southern provinces of Yala, Narathiwat, Phatthalung, Trang, and Satun.[2]

The Maniq are a hunting and gathering society. They build temporary huts of bamboo with roofs made of banana leaves. They hunt many types of animals and consume many different kinds of vegetables and fruits. They wear simple clothes made of materials such as bamboo leaves. They are familiar with many different species of medicinal herbs.[4]

Health & Nature: ‘How Bats Can Transmit Viruses’

When it comes to viruses jumping from animals to humans, bats hold a unique place in the transmission chain. Christopher Golden and James Longman investigate an abandoned mine for signs of poaching or viruses impacting the bat population.