Tag Archives: NYC

Remembering 9/11: How It Unfolded 20 Years Ago

Inside Views: Building New York City’s ‘Little Island’

New York City’s waterfront just got a radical addition. This is Little Island – a public park over the water financed by a billionaire. For more by The B1M subscribe now – http://ow.ly/GxW7y Full story here – https://theb1m.com/video/the-battle-t…

Views: Woolworth Tower Pinnacle Penthouse (4K)

“The Pinnacle Penthouse, developed by Alchemy Properties, is New York’s preeminent residential offering. Reaching 727 feet high, this five-story home encompasses 9,680 square feet of interior space and a private 408 square foot observatory terrace. Exquisite highlights include 125 windows, 24-foot ceilings and an in-residence private elevator. Delivered in architect ready condition, this offering has sparked the imagination and design talents of two of the most noted architects of our time,

Thierry W Despont and David Hotson. Despont is the world’s foremost designer of extraordinary restorations, opulent private estates, and legendary hotels. His vision for the Pinnacle embodies grand areas for entertaining along with ornate touches that make this penthouse unlike any other prized property in the world. There is an alternate design, which includes the acquisition of an additional floor, provided by David Hotson who is well known for his expertise in voluminous, residential spaces. His remarkable work at The Skyhouse Penthouse, at 150 Nassau Street, was awarded “Best Apartment of the Decade” by Interior Design Magazine in 2015. The acquisition and completion of what has been called, “One of the last great unclaimed spaces in New York City” is now available to be celebrated and transformed into an architectural masterpiece which can never be replicated!” https://thewoolworthtower.com/

Walks: New York City’s Meatpacking District (4K)

The Meatpacking District is a hip commercial area on the far west side. It’s home to the Whitney Museum of American Art, high-end designer clothing stores and a stretch of the High Line, an elevated park built atop former railroad tracks. At ground level, the cobblestone streets are filled with trendy restaurants and clubs that have taken over the cavernous spaces once occupied by the namesake meatpacking plants.

City Views: Summit One Vanderbilt Observation Deck In New York City

A new skyscraper in New York’s midtown Manhattan that towers 150 feet above the Empire State Building transports visitors in glass elevators up the sides of the building to an observation deck high above the city.

One Vanderbilt is a 1,401-foot office tower next to Grand Central from developer SL Green and architects Kohn Pedersen Fox. The 77-story, 1.7 million-square-foot skyscraper is NYC’s fourth-tallest tower. It officially opened to office tenants this past September, and still to come are $220 million in public open space and transit infrastructure improvements.

Climate: The Empire State Building’s Green Upgrade

Energy usage by large, old buildings like the Empire State Building represents a huge obstacle to cities’ dreams of carbon neutrality. New York City’s buildings account for 70% of its carbon emissions, for example, and half of those emissions are produced by the largest 5% of its structures. But retrofitting old buildings to make them more energy efficient represents a formidable challenge, both from an engineering perspective and in terms of convincing owners that doing so is in their financial interest.

Spring Views: Washington Square Park, New York

Washington Square Park is a 9.75-acre public park in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City. One of the best known of New York City’s public parks, it is an icon as well as a meeting place and center for cultural activity.

It is named for George Washington (1732-1799), the commander of the Continental Army, who was inaugurated in New York City as the first President of the United States on April 30, 1789. 

The land was once a marsh fed by Minetta Brook located near an Indian village known as Sapokanikan. In 1797 the City’s Common Council acquired the land for use as a “Potter’s Field” and for public executions, giving rise to the legend of the “Hangman’s Elm” in the park’s northwest corner.

Used first as the Washington Military Parade Ground in 1826, the site became a public park in 1827. Following this designation, prominent families, wanting to escape the disease and congestion of downtown Manhattan, moved into the area and built the distinguished Greek Revival mansions that still line the square’s north side. In 1838 the park hosted the first public demonstration of the telegraph by Samuel F.B. Morse.

Soon after the creation of the City’s Department of Public Parks in 1870, the square was redesigned and improved by M.A. Kellogg, Engineer-in-Chief, and I.A. Pilat, Chief Landscape Gardener. Their plan followed the principles of Fredrick Law Olmsted – providing a more rustic and informal space with curvilinear paths along its periphery, retaining many of the diagonal paths within the park’s core, and defining plots of grass with shade trees. The most dramatic change was the addition of a carriage drive through the park’s interior connecting Fifth Avenue to Lower Manhattan.

The marble Washington Arch, designed by noted architect Stanford White, was built between 1890-1892 and replaced a wooden arch erected in 1889 to honor the centennial of the first president’s inauguration. Statues of Washington were later installed on Arch’s north side – Washington as Commander-in-Chief, Accompanied by Fame and Valor (1916) by Hermon MacNeil, and Washington as President, Accompanied by Wisdom and Justice (1918) by Alexander Stirling Calder.