Tag Archives: New Exhibitions

New Exhibitions: 84-Year Old Artist Paul Kolker – “Dialogical Perception…Art As Experiment” (Video)

Paul Kolker is pleased to present his seventy-third solo exhibition, Dialogical Perception… Art as Experiment at his studio, the PAUL KOLKER collection, 511 West 25th Street from February 6 through March 27, 2020.

Paul Kolker (b. 1935) is a New York-based artist with doctorate degrees in medicine and law. He began his career of painting and sculpture in the 1960s, illustrating his peer review medical journal articles and life-casting anatomical models. In the 1970s he treated his art production as a post-minimalist experiment questioning experience and using the viewer as the measuring instrument as well as the interpreter of the experiment’s results. Many of his early works are sculptures, each painted in an elemental color, black or white.

In 1975 Kolker developed a keen and hands on understanding of light optics when he purchased a first generation three tube front end television projector with an alignment grid. That grid became the infrastructure for his works, which involved fractionation of a photographic image and the use of modular panels and canvases to create large scale works. In the 1980s Kolker began making light sculptures using one-way mirror and LED message screens, reflecting ad infinitum. In 2001, when he moved into his studio in Chelsea, he created an algorithm for a process of painting minimal shapes, such as a dot or square, in elemental colors (never mixed with each other, but sometimes mixed with black and/or white to form tints and shades). This process is called ‘fracolor’ in attribution to Benoit Mandelbrot’s fractal geometry, wherein minimal shapes and forms are serially replicated, like branches on a tree, rectangles on a grid, or pixels and dots on a television display screen.

As a result, Kolker’s works have become reminiscent of our pixelated world of digital information transfer, as we see it up close as grids of colored dots on our television, computer and cell phone screens; and how more highly defined that screen becomes when viewed from afar. His works are observational experiments which cry out to us, “Because of biases of color, shapes, parallax and perspective relative to where we stand as the observer, a dot may be a universe; and a universe may be a dot.”

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New Exhibitions: “El Greco – Ambition And Defiance” (Art Institute Of Chicago)

March 7 – June 21, 2020

This major exhibition charts the career of the artist known simply as El Greco. Over 57 works from across the world trace not only the development of his distinctive style but also the astounding ambition that drove him to relentlessly pursue success.

 

Portrait of Fray Hortensio Felix Paravicino El Greco 1609Born in Crete as Domenikos Theotokopoulos (1541–1614), El Greco trained in the traditional manner of Byzantine icon painting. He moved to Venice in 1567 to learn a new artistic approach, absorbing developments in Venetian Renaissance painting through the lens of artists such as Titian and Tintoretto. The works El Greco painted during his time in Venice, however, reveal both his embrace of and struggles to fully adapt to this manner of painting.

Art Institute of Chicago logoFollowing this transformative period, El Greco went to Rome, probably in an attempt to attract patronage within the papal circle. There his acceptance into the elevated circle of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese brought a close association with the painter Giulio Clovio and the erudite historian and collector Fulvio Orsini. El Greco’s portraits, allegories, and religious paintings between 1570 and 1577 reflect these relationships as well as his complicated engagement with Michelangelo and other artistic luminaries of the 16th century.

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New Exhibitions: Painter Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) – The Forum Gallery NYC

Photo of Andrew Wyeth by Peter Ralston In the Studio Courtesy of Ralston Gallery
Photo of Andrew Wyeth by Peter Ralston In the Studio Courtesy of Ralston Gallery

Forum Gallery, New York, presents an exhibition of works by Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009), who set the standard for American figurative art in the second half of the Twentieth Century. Working in pencil, watercolor, egg tempera and his much-beloved personal medium of drybrush, Wyeth, throughout his life, was a resolute champion of the universal life force of each person he chose to paint, and of the unique, difficult, ever-changing rural American world in which he chose to live. His art was controversial as it was popular, and he remains one of very few living artists to be celebrated by important single-person exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1976) and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (1987).

Firewood Study for Groundhog Day 1959 Andrew Wyeth
Firewood Study for Groundhog Day 1959 Andrew Wyeth (The Forum Gallery NYC)

“Andrew Wyeth: Five Decades” at Forum Gallery features paintings dated from 1940 through 1994, including landscapes that imply personal struggle and portray great beauty; and provocative figurative works, including examples from The Helga Pictures.

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Top New Exhibitions: “Tullio Crali – A Futurist Life” (Estorick Collection)

tullio-crali-a-futurist-life-exhibition-catalog.pngLondon – For Tullio Crali (1910-2000) Futurism was not just a school of painting, but an attitude to life itself. Reflecting the movement’s enthusiasm for the modern world, his imagery embraced technology and the machine as important sources of creative inspiration. However, with its particular focus on “the immense visual and sensory drama of flight”, Crali’s work is most closely associated with the genre of ‘aeropainting’, which dominated Futurist research during the 1930s.

Crali discovered Futurism when he was just fifteen years old. An immediate convert, he officially joined the movement in 1929 and quickly developed his own distinctive interpretation of its artistic principles. Despite incorporating recognisable details such as clouds, wings and propellers, Crali’s thrilling

Tullio Crali - Jonathan Monoplane 1988
Tullio Crali – Jonathan Monoplane 1988

imagery challenged conventional notions of realism by means of its dynamic perspectives, simultaneous viewpoints and powerful combination of both figurative and abstract elements.

As a result of his talent, versatility and unshakable commitment to Futurist ideas, Crali swiftly became one of the movement’s key representatives. He continued to be its staunchest advocate during the post-war era, remaining faithful to Futurism’s aesthetic tenets throughout his life.

Featuring rarely seen works from the 1920s to the 1980s, this exhilarating exhibition covers every phase of the artist’s remarkably coherent career, including iconic aeropaintings, experimental works of visual poetry and mixed-media reliefs, as well as examples of ‘cosmic’ imagery dating from the 1960s, inspired by advances in space exploration. Also featured are a large number of Crali’s famous Sassintesi: enigmatic compositions of stone and rock, ‘sculpted’ by natural forces.

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