Health Studies: Immune System Cells Rewire And Repair During Sleep

From a Sleep Review Magazine online release:

Sleep Review June July 2019The current study points to the role of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that signals arousal and stress in the central nervous system. This chemical is present in low levels in the brain while we sleep, but when production ramps up it arouses our nerve cells, causing us to wake up and become alert. The study showed that norepinephrine also acts on a specific receptor, the beta2 adrenergic receptor, which is expressed at high levels in microglia. When this chemical is present in the brain, the microglia slip into a sort of hibernation.

New research shows that immune cells called microglia—which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage—are primarily active during sleep.

The findings, which were conducted in mice and appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience, have implications for brain plasticity, diseases like autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and dementia, which arise when the brain’s networks are not maintained properly, and the ability of the brain to fight off infection and repair the damage following a stroke or other traumatic injury.

To read more: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/10/during-sleep-immune-cells-rewire/?ref=cl-title

Nostalgia: “Abbey Road” – 50 Years Since The Beatles Walked Off Stage (1969)

From a New Yorker Magazine online article:

Beatles Abbey Road Quote from Paul McCartney“Abbey Road” was the Beatles’ last word—the final recordings by the most popular and influential artists of the nineteen-sixties. Now, on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, “Abbey Road” has been expertly remixed by Giles Martin, George Martin’s son and protégé, and reissued in a super-deluxe edition that comes with an archive of studio outtakes and a hundred-page book of essays and liner notes that chronicle how the recordings were made. “The Beatles are good even though everybody already knows that they’re good,” the classical composer Ned Rorem observed in 1968, alluding to how the band’s immense popularity confounded the usual notions of discriminating taste. If anyone needs to be reminded of this, this new edition of “Abbey Road” should do the trick.

In the spring of 1969, Paul McCartney telephoned George Martin to ask if he would be willing to work with the Beatles on a new album they planned to record in the months ahead. Martin, who was widely regarded as the most accomplished pop-record producer in the world, had overseen the making of all nine albums and nineteen singles that the Beatles had released in Britain since their début on E.M.I.’s Parlophone label, in 1962. His reputation was synonymous with that of the group, and the fact that McCartney felt a need to ask him about his availability dramatized how much the Beatles’ professional circumstances had changed since the release of the two-record set known as the White Album, in the fall of 1968. In Martin’s view, the five months of tension and drama it took to make that album, followed by the fiasco of “Get Back,” an ill-fated film, concert, and recording project that ended inconclusively in January, 1969, had turned his recent work with the Beatles into a “miserable experience.”

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/when-the-beatles-walked-offstage-fifty-years-of-abbey-road?utm_campaign

Best New Art Books: “Masterpieces Of Painting J. Paul Getty Museum”(2019)

From a Getty Museum online release:

9781606065792_2000xMasterpieces of Painting surveys more than one hundred of the most exquisite and significant paintings displayed in the museum’s famed, daylight-suffused galleries. Vibrant full-color illustrations and engaging descriptions of these masterworks reveal their fascinating histories and cultural, social, and religious meanings. Sure to enchant and edify all art lovers, this book is a spellbinding tour through the history of Western painting.

Masterpieces Of Painting J. Paul Getty MuseumRooted in a passion for the Italian Renaissance as well as Dutch and Flemish Baroque works, the original collection of J. Paul Getty (1892–1976) has been transformed over four decades to include seminal pieces by celebrated masters such as Masaccio, Titian, Parmigianino, Cranach, El Greco, Rubens, van Dyck, Rembrandt, Poussin, Canaletto, Fragonard, Turner, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Monet, van Gogh, Cézanne, and Ensor.

Davide Gasparotto is senior curator in the Department of Paintings at the J. Paul Getty Museum, where Scott Allan is associate curator and Anne T. Woollett is curator. Peter Björn Kerber is curator at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London.

To read more: https://shop.getty.edu/products/masterpieces-of-painting-j-paul-getty-museum-978-1606065792?utm_source=artbound101&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=artbound101

Top Science Podcasts: Quantum Computing, Speediest Ants & Altering The “Deaf” Gene (Nature)

Nature PodcastListen to the latest from the world of science, with Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell. This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.

In this episode:

00:43 A quantum computing milestone

A quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. Research Article: Arute et al.News and Views: Quantum computing takes flightEditorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computingNews: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim

08:24 Research Highlights

The world’s speediest ants, and the world’s loudest birdsong. Research Highlight: A land-speed record for ants set in Saharan dunesResearch Highlight: A bird’s ear-splitting shriek smashes the record for loudest song

10:19 The mammals that lived with the dinosaurs

Paleontologists are shifting their view of Mesozoic era mammals. News Feature: How the earliest mammals thrived alongside dinosaurs

18:00 News Chat

A Russian researcher’s plans to edit human embryos, and ‘prime editing’ – a more accurate gene editing system. News: Russian ‘CRISPR-baby’ scientist has started editing genes in human eggs with goal of altering deaf geneNews: Super-precise new CRISPR tool could tackle a plethora of genetic diseases

Future Of Health Care: New Machine Learning System Detects Infections 48 Hours In Advance

From a Health IT Analytics online release:

Philips Machine Learning SystemThe prototype revealed that using artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine certain combinations of vital signs and other biomarkers could strongly predict the likelihood of infection up to 48 hours in advance of clinical suspicion, including observable symptoms.

Royal Philips, in collaboration with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) of the US Department of Defense (DoD), are building a machine learning algorithm that will be able to detect an infection before a patient shows signs or symptoms.

The partnering organizations recently announced results from an 18-month project, called Rapid Analysis of Threat Exposure (RATE), the first large-scale exploration of pre-symptomatic infection in humans. The project aims to develop an early warning system that accelerates diagnosis and treatment of infection, containing the spread of communicable disease.

To read more: https://healthitanalytics.com/news/philips-dod-build-machine-learning-system-to-detect-infection

Technology: Cowboy Electric Bike Is Lightweight, With Integrated Lights & Removable Battery

From a TechCrunch online review:

Cowboy Electric Bike integrated lightsFrom the outside, the Cowboy e-bike is a sleek bike. It features a seamless triangle-shaped aluminum frame, integrated lights and a low-key Cowboy logo near the saddle. The handlebar is perfectly straight like on a mountain bike. The only sign that this is an e-bike is that the frame is much larger below the saddle.

The e-bike is relatively light at 16kg (35lbs). Most of the weight is at the back of the Cowboy e-bike because of the battery. But an investor in the startup told me that it wasn’t a problem and that he was even able to attach a baby seat at the back.

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https://cowboy.com/

The two things you’re going to notice quite quickly is that there’s no gear and there’s a rubber and glass fiber belt. Cowboy has opted for an automatic transmission — motor assistance kicks in automatically when you need it the most, such as when you start pedaling, you accelerate or you go uphill.

To read more: https://techcrunch.com/2019/10/23/a-bike-lovers-take-on-the-cowboy-e-bike/

Top Camper Trailers: “Lume Traveler LT540” Is Larger, With Open Roof, Upgrades

From a New Atlas online review:

Lume Traveler LT540 outdoor kitchenCustomers who liked the original Lume tailgate kitchen will find a larger version in the LT540 No. 1/Pure spec trailers, but those looking for a more all-weather solution will be able to enjoy indoor cooking with the new Nordic floor plan, which pulls the kitchen inside across the front wall. To accommodate it, Lume pushes the double bed back toward the bumper and eliminates the front sofa standard on the No. 1 and Pure models.

https://www.lumetraveler.com/en/en-lancering-lt540/

Lume Traveler LT540 Open RoofLast year, Dutch startup Lume wowed the world by topping its highly distinctive Traveler LT360 caravan with a retractable soft top, creating an airier style of trailer camping. Despite costing more than €46,000 (US$51,000) at the time, Lume’s debut model was successful enough to inspire a second model: the longer, more spacious Traveler LT540. Rather than use the 540’s extra 5.5 feet (1.7 m) to stuff the whole family inside, Lume makes things more comfortable for the wandering twosome, adding a toilet room, available indoor kitchen, available seating lounge, and floor space.

To read more: https://newatlas.com/outdoors/lume-lt540-convertible-glamping-trailer/