Tag Archives: Boomers Health

Medical Diagnosis: 56-Year Old Woman Had Heart Attacks, But No Heart Disease? (New York Times)

From a New York Times Magazine article:

Diagnosis New York Times Illustration by Ina Jang 2019It was all horribly familiar — a rerun of an episode 15 months earlier, when she was with her family in River Vale, N.J. Back then, the burning pressure sent her to the emergency department, and she was told the same thing: She was having a heart attack. Immediately the cardiologist looked for blockages in the coronary arteries, which feed blood and oxygen to the hardworking muscles of her heart. That was the cause of most heart attacks. But they found no blockage.

Since childhood, she had frequent terrible canker sores that lasted for weeks. Sometimes it was hard to eat or even talk. Her mother, a nurse, told her everybody got them and thought she was being dramatic when she complained. So she had never brought them up with her doctors. Now the woman saw that her answer somehow made sense to the rheumatologist.

New York Times MagazineIndeed, that was the clue that led the rheumatologist to a likely diagnosis: Behcet’s disease. It’s an unusual inflammatory disorder characterized by joint pains, muscle pains and recurrent ulcers in mucus membranes throughout the body. Almost any part of the body can be involved — the eyes, the nose and lungs, the brain, the blood vessels, even the heart. Behcet’s was named after a Turkish dermatologist who in 1937 described a triad of clinical findings including canker sores (medically known as aphthous ulcers), genital ulcers and an inflammatory condition of the eye.

To read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/20/magazine/heart-attack-diagnosis.html?te=1&nl=the-new%20york%20times%20magazine&emc=edit_ma_20191122?campaign_id=52&instance_id=14017&segment_id=19010&user_id=415092ec82728104b9ca7bbb44eeb7d3&regi_id=7441254120191122

Fitness: 65-Year Old Climber Steve Swenson “Endurance” Trains Six Day A Week, Avoiding Injuries

From an Outside Magazine online article:

Steve Swenson Book KarakoramIn the spring and summer, he trained two to four hours a day, six days a week, running daily and carrying 60 pounds of water up a 4,000-foot peak near his home in Seattle twice a week. “All the research has shown that 80 percent of training for alpine ascents needs to be long duration and low intensity, to build a huge foundation of endurance,” Swenson says. “There are no shortcuts to this. There’s no thirty-minute-a-day gym workout. You have to have the discipline to put the time in.” 

As an older climber, when I go out and train on any particular day, my big goal is to not get injured. In my twenties and thirties, I would push through a tight muscle or minor pain, but now I just stop. It’s not worth it. The most important thing is to be able to come back tomorrow.”

(Steve) Swenson laments the common scenario for many older people, who often work too much, exercise too little, and find themselves unhealthy during their golden years. “Imagine spending all your years looking forward to retirement and you can’t enjoy it,” Swenson says.

To read more: https://www.outsideonline.com/2405337/steve-swenson-mountaineer

Health Studies: Immune System Cells Rewire And Repair During Sleep

From a Sleep Review Magazine online release:

Sleep Review June July 2019The current study points to the role of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that signals arousal and stress in the central nervous system. This chemical is present in low levels in the brain while we sleep, but when production ramps up it arouses our nerve cells, causing us to wake up and become alert. The study showed that norepinephrine also acts on a specific receptor, the beta2 adrenergic receptor, which is expressed at high levels in microglia. When this chemical is present in the brain, the microglia slip into a sort of hibernation.

New research shows that immune cells called microglia—which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage—are primarily active during sleep.

The findings, which were conducted in mice and appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience, have implications for brain plasticity, diseases like autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and dementia, which arise when the brain’s networks are not maintained properly, and the ability of the brain to fight off infection and repair the damage following a stroke or other traumatic injury.

To read more: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/10/during-sleep-immune-cells-rewire/?ref=cl-title

Boomers Fitness: 63-Year Old Unicycler Pedaled 30,000 Miles To Peak Health

From a Wall Street Journal online article:

Mr. Peterson pulls a trick on his unicycle in Redondo Beach, Calif. PHOTO DAVID WALTER BANKS FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNALNow 63, Mr. Peterson has progressed from bike paths to rugged mountain trails and is known for his caped helmet emblazoned with his nickname, UniGeezer. Based on his GPS and bike computer, he estimates he’s logged nearly 30,000 miles, or 24 million pedal revolutions, since he started.

He thinks there’s a fear factor that prevents more people from trying unicycling. “If you fall, 99% of the time you land on your feet,” Mr. Peterson says. His worst injury was a torn piriformis, a tiny muscle behind the glutes, from overuse.

Unicycling isn’t as trendy as spin class, but Terry Peterson says he sweats just as much and smiles way more.

In 2006, at age 50, Mr. Peterson was 30 pounds overweight and got winded climbing a flight of stairs. His job as a piano tuner in Lomita, Calif., was mostly sedentary.

Popular workouts like running, cycling and boot camp sounded boring. “I needed something that would constantly demand my attention and keep me entertained,” he says. He thought back to his childhood unicycle, googled his old toy and was wowed by online videos of Canadian off-road unicycling pioneer Kris Holm. “This wasn’t the cheap ride I had when I was 11,” he says. “He was on a real, purpose-built unicycle doing unreal tricks.”

To read more: https://www.wsj.com/articles/hes-gone-a-long-way-on-his-unicycle-11571572801

Chronic Pain Treatment: Medical Discussion On What Does And Doesn’t Work (UCTV Video)

     Chronic Pain: Observations as Patient and Provider About What Works          (…And What Doesn’t)

Chronic Pain ManagementDr. Grace Dammann, medical director of the Pain Clinic at Laguna Honda Hospital, and seven of her colleagues talk about what does and does not work in the treatment of chronic pain. She talks as both a patient and a provider. There is also a discussion of various non-pharmacologic and complementary medicine modalities to treat pain.

UCTV

Boomers Health: New Geriatric Surgery Verification Program Targets Communication And Screening For Vulnerabilities (Video)

Today, 10,000 people in the U.S. turn 65 every day. The U.S. Census Bureau projects the number of older adults to grow by 55 percent from 2010 to 2050, eventually making up 21 percent of the population.1 Currently, older adults account for more than 40 percent of all inpatient operations, and 33 percent of outpatient procedures performed annually in the U.S. This number will grow as the population ages, and the need for surgical services concurrently rises

The GSV Program will help hospitals of any size prepare for the influx of older adults considering surgery with care standards that define the resources hospitals need to have in place to perform operations effectively, efficiently, and safely in this vulnerable population. The standards take into account that older adults have distinct physical and social vulnerabilities, as well as unique goals for their care, that warrant a more thorough and individualized approach to surgery.

The standards outline processes for systematically improving older adult surgical care, including, but not limited to:

  • Improving communications with patients before surgical procedures to focus on outcomes that matter most to the patient
  • Screening for geriatric vulnerabilities
  • Better management of medications
  • Providing geriatric-friendly rooms
  • Ensuring proper staffing is in place

To read more click on following link: https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/geriatric-surgery