IBM Announces First Fully-Autonomous Ship That Will Cross The Atlantic In September 2020

From an IBM newsroom online release:

“Putting a research ship to sea can cost tens of thousands of dollars or pounds a day and is limited by how much time people can spend onboard – a prohibitive factor for many of today’s marine scientific missions,” said Brett Phaneuf, a Founding Board Member of ProMare and Co-Director of the Mayflower Autonomous Ship project (together with fellow Board Member Fredrik Soreide). “With this project, we are pioneering a cost-effective and flexible platform for gathering data that will help safeguard the health of the ocean and the industries it supports.”

LONDONOct. 16, 2019   IBM announced today that it has joined a global consortium of partners, led by marine research organization ProMare, that are building an unmanned, fully-autonomous ship that will cross the Atlantic on the fourth centenary of the original Mayflower voyage in September 2020.

The Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) will use IBM’s AI, most powerful servers, cloud and edge computing technologies to navigate autonomously and avoid ocean hazards as it makes its way from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts. If successful, it will be one of the first self-navigating, full-sized vessels to cross the Atlantic Ocean and will open the door on a new era of autonomous research ships.

To read more: https://newsroom.ibm.com/2019-10-16-IBM-Boards-the-Mayflower-Autonomous-Ship-Project#assets_all

Top Podcasts: Mark Shields And David Brooks On Latest In Washington

Shields and Brooks Oct 18 2019Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including how the impeachment inquiry is affecting President Trump’s support among Republicans, fallout from Trump’s handling of northern Syria and the military advance by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the changing dynamics of the 2020 presidential race.

Top New Travel Videos: “Remains Of The Fall” In Lapland, Finland (2019)

Filmed and Edited by: Timo Oksanen

Remains of the Fall Short Travel Film by Timo Oksanen 2019

In the end of September 2019 the leaves had fallen from most of the trees in Enontekiö, Finland, but the colours were still visible in the ground. I captured the remains of the fall foliage with my DJI Mavic 2 Pro with some help from ground-level timelapse cameras.

Music: Ian Post – Jump Jump

Remains of the Fall Short Travel Film by Timo Oksanen 2019

Website: http://timoksanen.fi/

Neuroscience Podcast: “Consciousness Theories” And “Biased Childhood Memories” (ScienceMag)

We don’t know where consciousness comes from. And we don’t know whether animals have it, or whether we can detect it in patients in comas. Do neuroscientists even know where to look? A new competition aims to narrow down the bewildering number of theories of consciousness and get closer to finding its biological signs by pitting different theories against each other in experimental settings. Freelance journalist Sara Reardon talks with host Sarah Crespi about how the competition will work.

Science Mag Podcast ConsciousnessIn our second segment, we talk about how we think about children. For thousands of years, adults have complained about their lack of respect, intelligence, and tendency to distraction, compared with previous generations. A new study out this week in Science Advances suggests our own biased childhood memories might be at fault. Sarah Crespi talks with John Protzko of the University of California, Santa Barbara, about how terrible people thought kids were in 3800 B.C.E. and whether understanding those biases might change how people view Generation Z today.

To read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/podcast/trying-find-mind-brain-and-why-adults-are-always-criticizing-kids-these-days