Tag Archives: Britain

Health: How Britain Is Planning To Roll Out The Covid-19 Vaccine (Video)

The U.K. became the first Western nation to vaccinate patients against Covid-19. WSJ explains how the country is planning to roll out the BioNTech-Pfizer vaccine at record speed, making it a test case for the rest of the world.

Photo: Jacob King/Bloomberg News

History: ‘Charge Of The Light Brigade, 1854’ (Video)

The true story of the suicidal mission of British forces to overrun the Imperial Russian fortifications with a courageous but foolhardy mass charge.

The Charge of the Light Brigade was a failed military action involving the British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces during the Battle of Balaclava on 25 October 1854 in the Crimean War. 

World News: A New British State, U.S.-China Strategy & Big Golf Swings (Podcast)

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, remaking the British statethe China strategy America needs (08:27) and consultants of swing (14:56)

Global News Podcast: America’s Ugly Election, Abe’s Japan & British Dogs

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ugly election: How bad could it get? How Abe Shinzo changed Japan (8:35) and why Britons walk their dogs so much (16:00).

Global News: How Viruses Shape The World, Black Elites & British Missteps

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how viruses shape the world, (10:25) African-American elites and Black Lives Matter, (18:22) and how misrule by algorithm is failing Britain.

Global News Podcast: Google, Migration & Inequality In Britain

The Economist Editor's PicksA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts.

Global News: China And The Pandemic, Saudi Arabia & Britain’s Glossy Mags (The Economist Podcast)

The Economist Editors Picks Podcast logoA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is China the pandemic’s big geopolitical winner? (8:30) Saudi Arabia has declared a ceasefire in Yemen, but the Houthis are fighting on. (14:13) And, how Britain’s glossy magazines are adjusting to a gloomy world.

Literary Debates: “This House Prefers Reading Oscar Wilde To George Orwell” (Cambridge)

The Cambridge Union logoABOUT THE MOTION: This House Prefers Reading Oscar Wilde to George Orwell Do we prefer satire or comedy? Do we take refuge in the serious or the frivolous? Do we understand the importance of being earnest or would we rather be in room 101? These two authors demonstrate well two powerful traditions in British literature, the comic and the satirical. They both of course share in each other’s art. Some would argue that during our present global crises we should look to Orwell more than ever, others would reach for the escapism of Oscar Wilde. In a new enterprise for the Cambridge Union, we are beginning our cultural debates – and this is our first. At least for a while.

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER (Closing for the Proposition) Will Self is the author of 25 books, some of which have been translated into 25 languages. His Dorian: An Imitation is an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray set during the AIDS crisis. He holds the Chair in Contemporary Thought at Brunel University, and lives in South London.

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER (Closing for the Abstention) Professor Angie Hobbs graduated in Classics and then a Ph.D. in Ancient Philosophy at the University of Cambridge. After a Research Fellowship at Christ’s College, she moved to the Philosophy Department at the University of Warwick. She was a judge of the Man Booker International Prize 2019 and is on the World Economic Forum Global Future Council 2018-9 for Values, Ethics and Innovation

Baby Boomer Economics: “Have Boomers Pinched Their Children’s Futures?”

The post-war baby boom of 1945-65 produced the biggest and richest generation in British history. David Willetts discusses how these boomers have attained this position at the expense of younger generations.

Have The Boomers Pinched Their Children's Futures Lord David Willetts The Royal Institution Video January 23 2020

Lord Willett’s book “The Pinch – How the Baby Boomers Took Their Children’s Future – And Why They Should Give it Back” is available now – https://geni.us/B0Gvq

Watch the Q&A: https://youtu.be/_qEjTXrQ7vs

Lord Willetts is a visiting Professor at King’s College London, Governor of the Ditchley Foundation, Chair of the British Science Association and a member of the Council of the Institute for Fiscal Studies. He is also an Honorary Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford. Lord Willetts has written widely on economic and social policy.

His book ‘The Pinch’, which focused on intergenerational equity, was published in 2010, and he recently published ‘A University Education’. Lord Willetts served as the Member of Parliament for Havant, as Minister for Universities and Science and previously worked at HM Treasury and the No. 10 Policy Unit.

This talk was filmed in the Ri on 28 November 2019.

British Sports Cars: “1959 Triumph TR3” Roadster

1959 Triumph TR3 Interior Classic DriverThe Triumph TR3 is a British sports car produced between 1955 and 1962 by the Standard-Triumph Motor Company of Coventry, England. A traditional roadster, the TR3 is an evolution of the company’s earlier TR2 model, with greater power and improved braking. Updated variants, popularly but unofficially known as the “TR3A” and “TR3B”, entered production in 1957 and 1962 respectively. The TR3 was succeeded by the Michelotti-styled, mechanically similar Triumph TR4.

The rugged ‘sidescreen’ TR, so named for its employment of removable plexiglass side curtains, was a sales and motorsport success. With approximately 74,800 TR3s sold across all variants, the model was the company’s third best seller in the TR range, behind the TR7 (111,500 units) and TR6 (94,500 units) models.[7] The Triumph was campaigned in races, hill climbs, and rallies across Europe and North America, with several outright, team, and class victories to its credit.

See more photos

From Wikipedia