Tag Archives: Trees

Ecology: Planting Trees To Cool Scotland’s Rivers

The Woodland Trust – River woodland is key to tackling

the twin climate and biodiversity crises – reducing flooding, improving river health and restoring the ecosystem. We’re working in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to plant and restore river woodland for people and wildlife.

In Scotland, this particularly means fish. Salmon, to be exact. Whole upland river catchments devoid of trees are seeing Scotland’s rivers warm to a point that could see salmon disappear in just 20 years. These fish need clean, cold water to thrive, and river woodland is the way to return it to them. The Woodland Trust is working across river catchments to expand native woodland alongside rivers and burns.

Trees provide shade and cover for young salmon and trout, stabilize riverbanks, slow the flow of water downstream and create wildlife corridors. A key part of this work involves working with landowners to plant and restore river woodland on their land, advising on the initial planting and empowering them to monitor their river woods into the future.

Previews: Country Life Magazine – Oct 5, 2022

The capital according to… Howard Jacobson tells Harry McKinley about the perfect bagel Trees for life. On the 50th anniversary of the Woodland Trust, Clive Aslet visits the Devon home of its farsighted founder, Ken Watkins. Speaking truth to power, British politicians have been at the mercy of cartoonists for centuries, finds Charles Harris.


Country Life Preview 60

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Soundscapes: California’s Giant Redwood Forests

Redwood National and State Parks are a string of protected forests, beaches and grasslands along Northern California’s coast. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park has trails through dense old-growth woods. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park is home to Fern Canyon, with its high, plant-covered walls. Roosevelt elk frequent nearby Elk Prairie. Giant redwood clusters include Redwood National Park’s Lady Bird Johnson Grove.

An #OurGreenPlanet co-production with The Listening Planet, in association with The Moondance Foundation.

Evolution: How Nature Is Adapting To Urban Sprawl

It’s a new and surprising chapter in the theory of evolution. According to recent studies, it’s in our cities, of all places, that animals and plants adapt particularly quickly to changing living conditions.

Nature’s response to the spread of cities is astonishing: Why do catfish in the river of a French city systematically prey on urban pigeons on the banks? Why do female birds on a university campus in California suddenly change their mating behavior? How do mice in New York’s Central Park cope with an altered diet of human food waste? How have killifish in the Atlantic built up resistance to deadly chemical waste?

And, is it possible for moths to adapt to nighttime light pollution? New research provides surprising new insights into Darwin’s theory of evolution. Nowhere else do animals and plants adapt so quickly to new living conditions as in cities. Biologists have long known that animals and plants occupy new habitats in the vicinity of humans.

But now, new genetic analyses show that these adaptations are accompanied by significant changes in DNA. Even more surprising: these evolutionary changes have not occurred over periods of millennia, but within just a few decades. The process has amazed scientists, who watch as nature transforms even our most hostile man-made interventions — pollution, light pollution, noise, garbage and dense development — into creative energy for new adaptations. Some researchers believe that our cities may soon develop their own, brand-new life forms. What are the implications of these developments for the balance between humans and nature on our planet?

Woodland Views: North York Moors In England

The North York Moors is an upland area in north-eastern Yorkshire, England. It contains one of the largest expanses of heather moorland in the United Kingdom. The area was designated as a National Park in 1952, through the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949.

Woodland Sanctuary is a joint exhibition between myself and Joe Cornish. The work was gathered over the last 6 years, all of it within the North York Moors National Park. Using my archived footage, I’ve made this relaxing video of local woodland scenes which will play on a loop in the Sanctuary room of the exhibition. I’ve decided to share it online so that it can be enjoyed by all.

The exhibition consists of 9 themes which reflect the preoccupations and imaginative journeys of the photographers during their time in the woods. The images reflect the intense experience of studying trees in all weather conditions and all times of year.

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Spring View: Hirosaki Park Cherry Blossoms In Japan

Hirosaki park is considered as one of the best cherry blossom viewing spots in Japan. It attracts over two million tourists across Japan. The park has about 2,600 trees of about 50 varieties and they are well-maintained by skilled gardeners.

The sakura viewing in Hirosaki Park is famous, not only because of the spectacular light-pink blanket of blossoms that arrive every spring, but for its old Somei-Yoshino cherry tree, planted in 1882.

Nature: A Great Horned Owl Chick In Florida

“Sunday Morning” takes us to Titusville, Florida, where a great horned owl chick is being cared for by Mom and Dad. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

Great horned owls are usually 18 – 25 inches tall, have tall ear tufts, and large yellow eyes. Their size, ear tufts, and eyes make them easily recognizable when seen during daylight hours.

They are found throughout Florida and roost in large, messy nests, in tall trees. The female is larger than the male, but the male has a larger and deeper voice box.

Spring In Japan: Sakura In Okazaki City, Aichi (8K)

Okazaki City is located in Aichi Prefecture and known as the birth place of Ieyasu Tokugawa, the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa Shogunate. In spring, over 800 cherry trees around Okazaki Castle bloom, creating a beautiful landscape against Otogawa River.