Tag Archives: Trees

Science: California Plants That Survive Wildfires

Nature Views: Caddo Lake, Texas-Louisiana Border

“Sunday Morning” takes us to Caddo Lake on the Texas-Louisiana border, home to a flooded forest of bald cypress and water tupelo trees. Videographer: Scot Miller.

Caddo Lake is a 25,400-acre lake and bayou on the border between Texas and Louisiana, in northern Harrison County and southern Marion County in Texas and western Caddo Parish in Louisiana.

Climate: Rainforests In Some Unexpected Places

Many of us are familiar with rainforests; lush and exotic environments that serve as the pinnacle of life on Earth. For the most part we assume these only occur throughout the tropics, but as it turns out certain areas in the temperate latitudes can receive just as much rainfall, creating a number of rainforests in unexpected places.

Temperate rainforests are coniferous or broadleaf forests that occur in the temperate zone and receive heavy rain. … The moist conditions of temperate rain forests generally support an understory of mosses, ferns and some shrubs and berries.

Science: The Secret Language Of Trees

Using a complex network of chemical signals, trees talk to each other and form alliances with fellow trees, even other species. 

Credits: Narrator: Stephanie Sammann Writer: Lorraine Boissoneault Editor: Dylan Hennessy (https://www.behance.net/dylanhennessy1) Illustrator/Animator: Kirtan Patel (https://kpatart.com/illustrations) Animator: Mike Ridolfi (https://www.moboxgraphics.com/) Sound: Graham Haerther (https://haerther.net) Thumbnail: Simon Buckmaster (https://twitter.com/forgottentowel) Producer: Brian McManus (https://www.youtube.com/c/realenginee…)

Views: Ecuador’s ‘Sword-Billed Hummingbirds’

The sword-billed hummingbird has exclusive access to food that other birds simply cannot reach, but having such a long bill does have its drawbacks.

The sword-billed hummingbird is a neotropical species of hummingbird from the Andean regions of South America. It is the sole member of the genus Ensifera and is characterized by its unusually long bill; it is the only bird to have a beak longer than the rest of its body. 

Cinematic Views: ‘Dance Of Shadows In Japan’ (Video)

During a three month journey travelling and working on organic farms in Japan, filmmaker Steve Atkins often found himself distracted by the beauty around him. As sunlight filtered through the trees that towered over him, their silhouette gracing the surface beneath or ahead him, he felt repeatedly drawn and connected with the Natural world — an effect of Komorebi performing itself on the peripheries.

There is a magical quality to the animate expression of Nature; a mutual puppet-show hosted between trees, light and wind. “When I paused long enough to take it all in, to share in a humble celebration of Nature’s playfulness, I was gifted with a potent ease,” Atkins shares…

Continue reading: https://www.nowness.asia/story/komore…

Analysis: Why Lumber Prices Have Boomed (WSJ)

Demand for lumber has skyrocketed during the pandemic, sending prices to all-time highs. This video explains what’s driving the lumber boom, who’s profiting, and why those growing the trees aren’t reaping the benefits. Illustration: Liz Ornitz/WSJ

Culinary Landscapes: Growing Lemons On The Amalfi Coast, Italy (Video)

For centuries, lemons have been grown on Italy’s Amalfi Coast, where they thrived on the mountainous terrain and became a key ingredient in the culinary landscape. Correspondent Seth Doane visits the Aceto family, which has been farming lemons for seven generations, and learns about the challenges and rewards of growing the sensorially-delightful fruit.

Wildfires: New Forests In Alaska Have Increased Carbon Sequestration

It’s no secret that warming temperatures are transforming landscapes in extreme northern regions. In Alaska, where wildfires have burned through many old-growth spruce forests in the past half decade, deciduous trees—such as aspen and birch—are starting to take over. But little is known about the impact these changes will have on how much carbon the forests release and store.

To find out, researchers trudged through the Alaskan taiga, seeking out wildfire sites where spruce once dominated. They mined these sites for information on carbon and nitrogen stores and forest turnover over time. What they found surprised them: In the long run, their estimates suggest that intensifying heat and more wildfires may lead to more carbon sequestration in Alaskan forests, they report today in Science. It’s impossible to know for sure that the flames will subside, but it’s a bit of good news as the fires burn out the old growth and bring in the new.

Read the research: https://scim.ag/3soUc4e