Tag Archives: Loire Valley

Walking Tour: Amboise In The Loire Valley, France

Amboise is a town in central France’s Loire Valley. It’s known for the Château d’Amboise, the grand 15th-century residence of King Charles VIII featuring Leonardo da Vinci’s tomb, as well as royal chambers, gardens and underground passageways. Just outside town, Château du Clos Lucé is Leonardo’s former home, where he lived until his death in 1519. It houses a small museum displaying working models of his designs. 

Walking Tour: Loches In The Loire Valley, France

As a town of Art and History, Loches cultivates the art of strolling around, from one street to the next, stopping to look at views of the inaccessible courtyards of the beautiful residences, the Indre River, the bell towers and the elegant surrounding countryside.

A medieval keep, royal apartments from the Renaissance period: in the royal city of Loches, you travel through history in just a few dozen metres.

So close to the great châteaux, and so far from the tumult of the cities, southern Touraine is a wonderful breath of fresh air, brimming with authenticity and charm. A sensitive natural area, the Louroux lake is a good example.

Filmed in Summer of 2022.

Equestrian Views: ‘Cadre Noir’ In Saumur, France

In the town of Saumur in France’s Loire Valley, the riders of the Cadre Noir represent excellence in the world of French equestrianism. The military-style academy trains elite riders who take part in top international competitions. Its expertise has been recognised by UNESCO, which listed it as Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2011. FRANCE 24 takes you behind the scenes of the stables.

The Cadre Noir is a corps of ecuyers, or instructors, at the French military riding academy École Nationale d’Équitation at Saumur in western France, founded in 1828. It also performs as an equestrian display team. Its name comes from the black uniforms that are still in use today.

City Walks: Tours In The Loire Valley, France (4K)

Tours is a university town between France’s Cher and Loire rivers. Once a Gallic-Roman settlement, today it’s a university town and a traditional gateway for exploring the chateaux of the Loire Valley region. Major landmarks include the cathedral, Saint-Gatien, whose flamboyant Gothic facade is flanked by towers with 12th-century bases and Renaissance tops.

Travel Guides: Top 25 Places To Visit In France

France, in Western Europe, encompasses medieval cities, alpine villages and Mediterranean beaches. Paris, its capital, is famed for its fashion houses, classical art museums including the Louvre and monuments like the Eiffel Tower. The country is also renowned for its wines and sophisticated cuisine. Lascaux’s ancient cave drawings, Lyon’s Roman theater and the vast Palace of Versailles attest to its rich history. 

Loire Valley Views: The Marshes Of Bourges

The city of Bourges in central France is famous for its UNESCO-listed cathedral and medieval city centre. But the capital of the Berry region has another historic asset: its marshes, a labyrinth of vegetable gardens. Located a few minutes from the city centre, the people of Bourges have enthusiastically maintained them for more than a century. This small corner of paradise is now attracting more and more city dwellers looking for peace and quiet. FRANCE 24 takes you to discover this unique but fragile ecosystem.

French Estates: ‘Cheverny Chateau’ – Loire Valley

We take you to discover a magnificent stately home located in #France​’s #LoireValley​. The #Château​ of #Cheverny​ is listed as a historical monument and it also inspired #Tintin​ creator Hergé for the family home of Captain Haddock. One in three visitors to Cheverny comes for the world of Tintin, an important source of income. The same family has carefully maintained the castle and grounds for more than six centuries, with each generation laying a new stone to the edifice.

The Château de Cheverny is a grand estate which has been in the same family for over six centuries. Cheverny has always been lived in and every generation has made a great effort to take care and embellish it with a true passion.

France Views: The 15 Most Beautiful Places To Visit

A shaft of pure sunlight illuminating the pastel façade of a village house, the improbably clear emerald shallows of a deserted Corsican beach or the unspoilt powdery snow of majestic Alpine peaks – these are just a few of the most beautiful places in France. It’s time to start planning a road trip to see them all.

  1. Plateau de Valensole, Provence
  2. Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, Cote D’Azur
  3. Menton, Cote D’Azur
  4. Megève, The Alps
  5. Arles, Provence
  6. Île d’Or, Porquerolles, Var
  7. Bordeaux, Gironde
  8. Cap Corse, Corsica
  9. Parc Naturel Regional des Volcans
  10. Ramatuelle, Var
  11. Cassis, Provence
  12. Chateau de Chenonceau, Loire Valley
  13. Saint-Jean-De-Luz, Basque Country
  14. Mont Saint-Michel, Normandy
  15. Grands Crus Wine Trail, Alsace

Train Journeys: ‘Orleans To Reims’, France (Video)

Michael Portillo travels from the chateaux of the Loire Valley to the heart of the Champagne region at Reims. Beginning in historic Orleans, Michael follows his Bradshaw’s guide to the magnificent stained-glass windows of the Cathedral of Sainte-Croix, which tell the story of the heroine of France, Joan of Arc. The image of the saintly teenage warrior endures as a symbol of resistance, and her life is celebrated in an annual parade. Michael meets her modern-day incarnation. Among the spectacular Renaissance palaces and fortresses of the River Loire, Michael is intrigued to discover a castle much modernized during the 1930s, which became a refuge for a British royal couple embroiled in scandal. The wedding of the former king, Edward VIII, and the American divorcee Wallis Simpson at Chateau Cande in the summer of 1937 was shunned by the British establishment. Michael takes a spin around the track at Le Mans in a French-built car that won two endurance races during the 1920s. At Versailles, Michael visits the opulent palace and neighbouring Trianon Palace Hotel, where his Bradshaw’s guide describes the signing of the Peace Treaty at the end of the First World War. Arriving in the capital, Paris, Michael heads for Montparnasse, where wildly creative artists and writers of the 1920s and 30s spawned new art movements. Michael joins a life-drawing class at an art school with an impressive legacy. Backstage at the Folies Bergere, Michael asks the ‘enfant terrible’ of fashion Jean Paul Gaultier about his homage to the black American dancer of the 1920s Josephine Baker. East of Paris in champagne country, Michael finishes his journey in style with a tour of the cellars at Domaine Pommery and a glass of fizz with the owner.