Category Archives: Business

World Economic Forum: ‘Top Stories Of The Week’

Top stories of the week of September 23, 2022 from the World Economic Forum:

Video timeline: 0:15 Could These Solar Panel Windows Be The Future Of Green Energy? – If deployed on a large scale, Ubiquitous Energy says the windows could transform solar capacity worldwide. 01:33 What Would A Post-Economic Growth World Look Like? – ‘What is the type of growth that the world needs? And what is the type of de-growth we need?’ asks Tariq Al-Olaimy, Social Entrepreneur and Global Shapers Alumni. 04:41 Clean energy jobs boom – Green energy jobs in wind and solar are more available than fossil fuel jobs for the first time 05:57 Is your smartphone making you less smart? – Not according to scientists

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Sept 24, 2022

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An energy crisis and geopolitics are creating a new-look Gulf

It will be richer, more powerful—and more volatile

Vladimir Putin vows to send more invaders. The West should arm Ukraine faster

It has a window of opportunity to push Russian forces back

World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week’s top stories include:

0.15 – These restaurants are making takeout sustainable: Just Salad, Loop, DeliverZero, and Burger King are cutting back on food containers and packaging. Here’s how. 01.38 – Nuclear Power is unpopular but could really save our planet: The IEA says the world’s nuclear power capacity must double by 2050 if we are to achieve net zero. 03:13 – The renewable battery made from crab and lobster shells: Scientists at the University of Maryland have shown the potential of the chemical chitin to make a biodegradable electrolyte. 04:10 – Handheld device lets you check for breast cancer at home: The device, called the Dotplot, has won the 2022 UK James Dyson Award.

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Cover Previews: Barron’s Magazine – Sept 12, 2022

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Inflation Could Be Harder to Tame Than the Fed Anticipates

Randall W. Forsyth

Europe’s Natural-Gas Problem Feeds North America’s Fertilizer Boom. How Long Will It Last?

Jack Hough

The Stock Market Rallied This Week. Thanks, Technical Analysis!

Nicholas Jasinski

IHS Is a Play on Emerging Market Cellphones. Why the Stock Looks Like a Buy.

El Salvador’s Failed Bitcoin Experiment

The country made history in legalizing Bitcoin, but it is now suffering the consequences. What went wrong is a cautionary tale for crypto.

Green Tech: New Ocean Wave Energy Companies

The ocean’s waves are immensely powerful. Harnessing that energy for grid-scale electricity production would be a major boon to the clean energy industry, but building durable, powerful, and cost-effective wave energy converters has proven difficult.

Chapters: 1:46 The challenges 4:05 Wave energy in the U.S. 4:49 (Subchapter) CalWave 6:05 (Subchapter) Oscilla Power 7:34 (Subchapter) C-Power 9:00 Wave energy in Europe 11:51 The future

Now though, an influx of federal funding is helping many U.S. companies gear up to test their latest wave energy technologies, giving many in the industry hope that wave power will see massive growth over the next few decades.

Indonesia Views: South Sea Cultured Pearl Farms

South Sea pearls are the largest cultured-pearl variety, sometimes reaching over 20 millimeters in diameter. The Pinctada maxima oyster can take up to five years to produce a single South Sea pearl, whereas more common freshwater oysters can take as little as three months and create dozens of pearls. This long cultivation process makes South Sea pearls rarer — and more expensive. A single South Sea pearl can cost $1,500, and a necklace can reach over $200,000. So, how are these pearls grown? And what makes them so expensive?

World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week’s top stories of the week include: 0:16 This teenager’s invention could change the world of electric cars 02:59 France is paying it’s drivers to get on their bikes 04:22 The psychological phenomenon that is hampering our response to climate change 05:33 Paris’s Riverside Booksellers are thriving once more

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Mozambique Views: Will Ruby Mining Improve Lives?

Rubies are increasingly prized on the international gemstone market. The world’s largest ruby mine is in northern Mozambique, where thousands of people are fleeing extremist militias. Can the lucrative business improve the lives of the people there?

The mine’s executives have a clear-cut position: They say they pay the taxes they owe, and Mozambique’s government should use the money to build schools in the region, ensure security and fight poverty. They say the mine alone can’t provide a livelihood to the entire region. Meanwhile, some residents regularly attempt to enter and mine rubies themselves. In the past, there have been reports of violent confrontations with the mine’s security personnel. Are the rubies a blessing or a curse? A report by Adrian Kriesch.

Firearms: Why AR-15-Style Rifles & Guns Are Surging

Known as a symbol of freedom to its admirers and an assault weapon to its detractors, the AR-15 is one of the most controversial weapons in America. Lightweight and easily customizable AR-15-style weapons have skyrocketed in popularity in recent years taking center stage at gun ranges and shooting competitions across the country.

Chapters: Intro: 0:002:17 Chapter 1 America’s rifle: 2:185:30 Chapter 2 Gun ownership in America: 5:317:35 Chapter 3 Gun-makers: 7:369:51 Chapter 4 Gun ads: 9:5211:55 Chapter 5 Mass shootings: 11:5616:29

According to the most recent national figures, there are an estimated 393 million civilian-owned firearms in the U.S. And there are about 20 million AR-15-style weapons in the country. Firearm manufacturers have seen revenue surge taking in about $1 billion from the sale of AR-15-style weapons in the past decade.

But the weapons have also been involved in a number of mass shootings. AR-15-style weapons were used at shootings in an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, a Fourth of July parade in suburban Chicago and a grocery store in upstate New York. Critics argue the weapons are also aggressively marketed by gun companies targeting at-risk young males.

So what is behind the popularity of the AR-15 and what responsibility do gun makers have when their products are used in mass shootings? Watch the video to learn more.

Views: History Of New York’s Fulton Fish Market

The Fulton Fish Market in New York is celebrating its 200th anniversary this year. Jeff Glor goes inside and takes a look at the market’s history.

Opened in 1822, New York City’s Fulton Fish Market is one of the oldest fish markets in the United States. Well before the Brooklyn Bridge was even built, the market at South Street Seaport thrived with fishing boats and fishmongers bartering and bantering over stalls heaving with fresh fish. Each night the colorful market would come to life with its cast of characters, eager chefs and curious tourists, all mingling over bushels of oysters, crates of lobsters and a kaleidoscope of sea creatures from near and far. Perhaps more than any other institution, the Fulton Fish Market captured the spirit and tradition of old New York.