Tag Archives: Computers

Science Podcast: Secrets Of Einsteinium, Chemicals Sap Ozone & Traffic Jams

Exploring the properties of a vanishingly-rare man-made element, and the AI that generates new mathematical conjectures.

In this episode:

01:04 Einsteinium’s secrets

Einsteinium is an incredibly scarce, man-made element that decays so quickly that researchers don’t know much about it. Now, using state-of-the-art technology, a team has examined how it interacts with other atoms, which they hope will shed new light on einsteinium and its neighbours on the periodic table.

Research Article: Carter et al.

06:28 Research Highlights

The mysterious appearance of three ozone-depleting chemicals in Earth’s atmosphere, and how ride-sharing services have failed to reduce traffic jams.

Research Highlight: Mystery on high: an ozone-destroying chemical appears in the air

Research Highlight: Uber and Lyft drive US gridlock — but not cuts in car ownership

8:38 The computer that comes up with new mathematical formulas

A team of researchers have developed artificial-intelligence algorithms that can generate new formulas for calculating the digits of key mathematical numbers like pi. Although crucial, many of these numbers remain mysterious, so it is hoped that this system will open up new avenues of questioning for mathematicians.

Research Article: Raayoni et al.

14:48 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a new theory to explain a sixty-year-old mystery surrounding the icy deaths of a group of Russian students, and the continued controversy about the chances of life on Venus.

Video: Explaining the icy mystery of the Dyatlov Pass deaths

News: Life on Venus claim faces strongest challenge yet

Technology: Opening Day ‘CES 2021’ – Online Demos Of Consumer Electronics

It’s the first day of CES 2021 and CNET is the place to kick off the tech decade with wall-to-wall coverage from inside the Consumer Electronics Show.

Check out more from CES 2021 https://www.cnet.com/ces/

Consumers: ‘CES 2021’ – World’s Biggest Tech Show, Jan 10-14 (Video)

As CES goes online for the first time, we preview the most-anticipated products and trends (and what’s missing) at the world’s biggest tech show.

Online Search: Antitrust Lawsuit Against Google Explained (WSJ Video)

The Justice Department is filing an antitrust lawsuit against Google. Here’s how the tech giant ended up in the crosshairs of federal regulators.

WSJ’s Jason Bellini reports. Photo: Getty Images

Top New Science Podcasts: Cooling Computer Chips, Covid-19 & Avalanches

Nature looks at: Keeping electronics from overheating, Covid-19 changes, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.

In this episode:

00:46 Cool computers

Keeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool. Research Article: van Erp et al.

06:57 Coronapod

By comparing coronavirus genomes taken from people around the world, researchers are getting an idea of how SARS-CoV-2 is changing as it spreads. We discuss a particular genetic mutation that rapidly became dominant early in the pandemic, and the effect it may have had on the outbreak. News: The coronavirus is mutating — does it matter?

21:41 Research Highlights

How rock avalanches can cause destructive air blasts, and melting glaciers cause lakes to grow. Research Highlight: The violent blasts that can add to an avalanche’s devastationResearch Article: Shugar et al.

23:59 The people left out of genetic studies

Minority populations are often underrepresented in genetic study recruitment. However, even when data about them is collected it may go unused. We find out why, and what can be done about it. Comment: Don’t ignore genetic data from minority populations

30:51 Briefing Chat

We discuss some of the latest stories highlighted in the Nature Briefing. This week we discuss how bacterially-infected mosquitoes could curb dengue fever, and some surprisingly large black holes. Nature News: The mosquito strategy that could eliminate dengueNature News: ‘It’s mindboggling!’: astronomers detect most powerful black-hole collision yet

Technology: “Can 5G Replace Your Home Internet?” (WSJ Video)

Blazing fast 5G speeds are here but they aren’t all that useful on the new 5G smartphones. WSJ’s Joanna Stern packed up a motor home to see if the connection could power all her connected gadgets, including laptops, printers, Xboxes and camera-equipped doorbells. She explains the confusing world of 5G along the way.

Photo illustration: Sharon Shi

New Science Podcasts: Faster Image ID, Crafting Crystals And Coronavirus / Covid-19 Update (Nature)

Nature PodcastsListen to the latest from the world of science, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe. This week, improving computers’ image identification, and a new method for growing crystals.

In this episode:

00:44 Upgrading computer sight

Researchers have designed a sensor that allows machines to assess images in nanoseconds. Research Article: Mennel et al.News and Views: In-sensor computing for machine vision

06:51 Research Highlights

Calorie restriction’s effects on rat cells, and the dwindling of sandy seashores. Research Highlight: Old age’s hallmarks are delayed in dieting ratsResearch Highlight: Sandy beaches are endangered worldwide as the climate changes

08:53 Crafting crystals

To understand the structure of materials, researchers often have to grow them in crystal form. A new method aims to speed up this process. Research article: Sun et al.

14:48 News Chat

Coronavirus outbreak updates, and climate change’s role in the Australian bush fires. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infectionNews: Climate change made Australia’s ‘unprecedented’ bushfires 30% more likely

Interviews: 63-Year Old Guido Van Rossum, Python Programming Language Creator (Oxford Union)

Van Rossum is a Dutch programmer and the author of the programming language Python. Python was first released in 1991 and is now one of the world’s most popular coding languages. Van Rossum was the language’s Benevolent Dictator for Life until 2018, and now sits on the Python Steering Council. He has also developed software for Google, and currently works at Dropbox.

ABOUT THE OXFORD UNION SOCIETY (OUS): The Oxford Union is the world’s most prestigious debating society, with an unparalleled reputation for bringing international guests and speakers to Oxford. Since 1823, the Union has been promoting debate and discussion not just in Oxford University, but across the globe.

Website

Top Science Podcasts: AI Beats Humans At A Video Game, Arthropods In Decline (Nature)

Nature PodcastHear the latest science news, with Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell. This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods.

In this episode:

00:51 Learning to play

By studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft IIResearch Article: Vinyals et al.News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II

10:08 Research Highlights

A record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter’s favourite tunes. Research Highlight: Here come the lightning ‘megaflashes’Research Highlight: Why some songs delight the human brain

12:24 Arthropods in decline

Researchers have surveyed how land-use change has affected arthropod diversity. Research article: Seibold et al.

18:30 News Chat

Young Canadians file a lawsuit against their government, an Alzheimer’s drug gets a second chance, and South Korean efforts to curb a viral epidemic in pigs.