Category Archives: Style

Covers: The NY Times Style Magazine – Nov 13, 2022

Inside the Mezquita in Cordoba, with its 800-odd columns: a church that was once a mosque.

Three writers go searching for echoes of a vanished culture — or a resurrected one.

– SpainIn the country’s churches and streets, the remnants of eight centuries of Islamic rule are hiding in plain sight.

– Singapore: Cuisine is one of the few ways to define Peranakan culture, a hard-to-pin-down blend of ethnic and racial identities.

– TajikistanWhile the nation’s history is being hidden behind glimmering new facades, its artisans hold on to tradition with quiet determination.

Preview: New York Times Style Magazine – 10.2.2022

In the salon of Il Palazzetto, a print by Giuseppe Capogrossi plays counterpoint to frescoes depicting scenes from Virgil’s Aeneid.
In the salon of Il Palazzetto, a print by Giuseppe Capogrossi plays counterpoint to frescoes depicting scenes from Virgil’s Aeneid.Credit…Danilo Scarpati

An Italian Villa Where Architecture Is a Family Affair

Most homes hold the history of their owners, but Il Palazzetto is as much a monument to its designers as to its inhabitants.

In Malibu, an Inflatable Bungalow for Robert Downey Jr.

The actor’s thin-shell home is at once an aerodynamic oddity and, perhaps, a harbinger of environmentally conscious architecture.

Preview: France-Amérique Magazine – September 2022

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Fashion on the High Wire

This month, the world’s greatest couturiers will descend on New York and Paris for Fashion Week. For the occasion we bring you stories about la mode and the people behind it. Read about Lee Miller (“A Fashion Model in Combat Boots”), Condé Nast (“The Man Behind the Empire”), and how young, urban creatives in France and America have adopted le bleu de travail – the French worker’s jacket. Also in this issue, travel to the South of France and the Camargo Foundation, which was created in 1971 by American filmmaker Jerome Hill; read our editorial on the Uberization of the world, and meet Belgian “food alchemist” Pascal Baudar, who spends most of his time in the hills around Los Angeles looking for his next meal: plants, fruit, seeds, grains, and even insects!

Design & Style: Fornasetti ‘Sun Star’ Tapestries (2022)

Fornasetti presents a series of 12 hand-knotted tapestries named ‘twelve months and twelve suns’ as well as a previously unseen 13th tapestry.

Fornasetti: precious porcelain, refined furniture and home accessorize illustrate the Atelier’s creativity. The decorations play with shapes and turn everyday objects into multiples of art. The world of Fornasetti floats between imagination and reality, enriched by cultural references and artistic allusions. This is why a Fornasetti object is not simply something to possess, it is something to live and be inspired by.

New Photography Books: ‘Yachts – The Impossible Collection’ (Assouline)

Yachts: The Impossible Collection is an eclectic and carefully curated anthology of ships, from the 1851 ship for which the America’s Cup was named, to J Class racing yachts of the early 1900s, to the current high-tech megayachts, from classics with timeless silhouettes, to head-turners that broke the mold with daring design and redefined their era. 

Since time immemorial, monarchs, nobility and the aristocracy have yearned to spend their leisure time on the water. From Cleopatra’s fabled luxury barge to Her Majesty’s Royal Yacht Britannia, from elegant Jazz Age vessels such as Nahlin, once chartered by King Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson, to the swinging ’60s Hollywood royalty invited aboard Aristotle Onassis’ Christina O, the yachting scene has always attracted celebrities, high society and the top 0.1%. But with over three thousand sizable yachts currently in the global fleet, not to mention those legendary vessels that are sadly no longer in existence, how do we distinguish the crème de la crème of this exclusive breed?

And with so much focus today on the environment and the health of the oceans, the yachting world is changing quickly, increasingly pursuing sustainability. Whether impossible in sheer size, speed, luxurious features or advanced green technology, all of the vessels in this fantasy marina have transformed the yachting seascape.

As long as there are people with means and blue oceans to explore, there will always be a demand for these beautiful and impossible creatures that break the boundaries of technology, luxury and decadence—and new yachts are still yet to be built, worthy of The Impossible Collection.

Miriam Cain is a U.K.-based luxury journalist and editor, specializing in the superyacht industry for two decades, in a variety of editorial and PR roles, including editor of Elite Traveler Superyachts and SEA+I Magazine. Cain is currently the editor for the yachting and lifestyle publication Navigator, and she also contributes to a variety of international yachting publications as a freelance journalist.

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Home Tour Video: Singer Vanessa Carlton’s Stylish SoHo Factory Loft (AD)

Today Architectural Digest is welcomed downtown by Vanessa Carlton for a tour of her stylish and utilitarian SoHo loft. The one-time mercantile factory retains touches from it’s previous life, with stately brick walls and wooden columns framing rooms softened by deep couches and faux fur throws.

Vanessa is passionate about preserving the planet and always seeks to repurpose items while decorating, like the reclaimed wood shelves in her living room or the old theater lights that hang above her kitchen island. And having recently released her sixth studio album “Love Is An Art,” it’s no surprise to find a pair of pianos ready and waiting for when inspiration strikes.

Top Interior Design: “The Print House” In London

‘Soaring ceilings, original timber beams and wooden flooring, flooded with light from floor-to-ceiling sash windows at both aspects’ 

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THE MODERN HOUSE: Brilliantly located in Hoxton, this 19th-century former print house is now a three-bedroom house of exceptional character, scale and versatility. It is arranged across five floors with over 3,700 sq ft of internal living space, including a cinema and artists’ studio, and has two large south-facing terraces.

The house is accessed via a gated front courtyard and entered through an intimate cloakroom. The ground floor is predominantly open plan with the living room and kitchen separated by a wonderful wall of timber-framed stained glass. Painted-brick walls and original timber beams unite the two spaces with wooden floors in the reception becoming concrete in the kitchen. The latter is an enormous space arranged around a large island unit, with a dining area and, beneath a series of pitched roof lights, a six-oven Aga.

The Modern House

From the reception, a concealed door leads to the lower-ground level; a flowing warren of spatial ingenuity comprising steam room, office, utility room, guest WC, and a beautifully finished cinema with seating for seven.

A staircase with timber-panelled walls ascends to the first floor. Here, a dramatic library with soaring ceilings, original timber beams and wooden flooring is flooded with light from floor-to-ceiling sash windows at both aspects. A gas stove and its chimney stack are the only interruption to a towering wall of custom-made bookshelves. Incorporated into the cabinetry, a tropical fish tank offers a distorted glimpse into the room beyond; an elegant guest bedroom with painted-panel walls, a free-standing bath and an excellent walk-in shower with mosaic-tiled flooring and exposed-brick walls.

Reached via an elegant open-tread staircase from the library and occupying the entire second floor, is the master bedroom, with dressing room and en-suite bathroom. An exposed-brick patina on one wall is matched with painted brick on another, all set against dark wooden floors and punctuated with a sculptural free-standing copper bath. With a south-facing window and French doors that lead onto a wonderfully large terrace, this is one of the brightest rooms in the house.

The third floor is a recent addition to the house and is similarly bathed in natural light from walls of Crittall at both aspects; from the north-facing balcony of the artists’ studio, a south-facing landing and a bedroom with gas stove, currently used a room for reading. Steps lead from the studio through an electric roof light and onto an excellent roof terrace, with far-reaching views in every direction.

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Travel: “The New York Times Style Magazine” – The Silk Road (May 2020)

For years, Silk Road travelers made the grueling trek past towering mountain ranges and ancient cities now lost to time. Centuries later, one writer attempts to retrace the journey.

T Magazine - The New York Times

 

This year, T’s spring Travel issue is devoted to just five stories, each an account of its writer’s journey along a different section of the Silk Road — the ancient network of trade routes that until the 15th or 16th century spanned some 4,000 miles of the globe, from Central Asia across the Middle East to Southern Europe, and formed a vital conduit for both new commodities and new ideas. While venturing to faraway places might seem like a distant possibility now, a year after this issue began to take shape, as we reckon with the global pandemic, these pieces are a powerful reminder of our innate desire to move and explore.

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Style: A Look At NYC Home Of The Late Lee Radziwill – “Muse To Warhol And Capote” In 1960’s & 70’s

Fluent in French and Italian, Lee Bouvier Radziwill was able to navigate New York and European high society, and support her sister Jackie, who became the First At Home With Lee Radziwill Christies video April 5 2020Lady when her husband John F. Kennedy was elected President.

Fashion writer Hamish Bowles said Radziwill ‘defined dynamic American style for decades’. In fact it was Lee’s innate style that helped shape Jackie Kennedy’s wardrobe and transformed her into a fashion icon. Lee had a taste for the exotic and unexpected, and understood how clothes could be used to make a statement in the political arena.

She was one of Truman Capote’s ‘Swans’ — the beautiful socialites he doted on — and when he threw his spectacular Black and White masked ball at The Plaza in 1966, she was a guest of honor.

Lee was just as comfortable at the Factory, mingling with Gerard Malanga and Andy Warhol, or on the Rolling Stones’ tour bus with Mick Jagger and his wife Bianca, who holidayed with her in the Hamptons.

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