Category Archives: Diet & Nutrition

Type 2 Diabetes: Benefits Of Insulin Resistance Diet

Cleveland Clinic (May 25, 2023) – What you eat matters. You may be able to prevent insulin resistance, which can lead to Type 2 diabetes by eating a well-balanced diet. This video shares 7 tips to help prevent or manage insulin resistance.

Chapters: 0:00 What is insulin resistance? 0:34 Pick low calorie foods 0:41 Lean meats and fish 0:53 Look for high fiber ingredients 1:04 Swap full fat for low-fat 1:20 Use olive or sesame oils 1:35 Choose whole grains 1:46 Consider a low-glycemic diet 1:50 Small changes over time

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is a complex condition in which your body does not respond as it should to insulin, a hormone your pancreas makes that’s essential for regulating blood sugar levels. Several genetic and lifestyle factors can contribute to insulin resistance.

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Healthy Aging: ‘Outlive – The Science And Art Of Longevity’ By Peter Attia

Trained as an oncological surgeon, Attia became interested in longevity because he saw that the “Four Horsemen” worked against it: diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. All play a role in an unhealthy system, and all interrelate.

‘OUTLIVE – THE SCIENCE & ART OF LONGEVITY’ BY PETER ATTIA, MD

Outlive: The Science and Art of Longevity - Kindle edition by Attia MD,  Peter . Health, Fitness & Dieting Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

A data- and anecdote-rich invitation to live better, and perhaps a little longer, by making scientifically smart choices.

If you have Type 2 diabetes, then your chances of developing heart disease, cancer, and neurological disorders increases, and if your goal is to live well in old age, then it behooves you to change your ways in order to keep your insulin reception levels in the clear. How to do so?

READ MORE AT KIRKUS REVIEWS

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – April 2023

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Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter (April 2023)

  • The Truth about “Brain-Boosting” Supplements
  • News Bites
  • Personalized Nutrition
  • Special Report: Cooking with Kids
  • Eight Cups of Water a Day?
  • Featured Recipe: April Fools’ Day Tofu Scramble
  • Ask Tufts Experts: Cardiovascular Disease; Melatonin

Heart Health: Cardiology Magazine – March 2023

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CARDIOLOGY MAGAZINE – MARCH 2023 ISSUE:

The Triple Whammy: Obesity, Diabetes and Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Their Impact on CVD

MARCH 2023

“It’s extremely important we as health care professionals address diabetes, poor sleep and poor sleep hygiene, and obesity as they are modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says Nishant P. Shah, MD, FACC, a preventive cardiologist at Duke Heart Center, Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, NC.

Obesity, diabetes and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are considered to be extant and growing public health crises. A wealth of information links these conditions to each other and to increased morbidity, reduced quality of life and death. While managing these conditions that often occur together may be challenging for patients and clinicians, successfully addressing them represents a real opportunity to reduce cardiovascular disease and prevent cardiovascular events.

READ CARDIOLOGY MAGAZINE DIGITAL ISSUE ONLINE

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – March 2023

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Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter (March 2023):

  • Obesity is a Disease: Why, and Why It Matters
  • News Bites
  • The Health Benefits of Strength Training
  • Special Report: Optimizing Sleep
  • Tummy Trouble: When to Seek Help
  • Featured Recipe: Cabbage Roll Casserole
  • Ask Tufts Experts: Vitamin C supplements; Processed Meats

Infographic: Obesity And Cardiovascular Disease

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Our new position paper with @worldheartfed summarises the relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disease (#CVD) mortality.

World Obesity Federation (January 2023) – The ongoing obesity epidemic represents a global public health crisis that contributes to poor health outcomes, reduced quality of life, and >2.8 million deaths each year. Obesity is relapsing, progressive, and heterogeneous. It is considered a chronic disease by the World Obesity Federation (WOF) and a chronic condition by the World Heart Federation (WHF).

People living with overweight/obesity are at greater risk for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased adiposity (body fat), particularly visceral/abdominal fat, is linked to CV risk and CV disease (CVD) via multiple direct and indirect pathophysiological mechanisms. The development of CVD is driven, in part, by obesity-related metabolic, endocrinologic, immunologic, structural, humoral, haemodynamic, and functional alterations.

Learn more: http://bit.ly/3THvOZa

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – January 2023

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Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter – January 2023:

Ask Tufts Experts: January 2023

Elimination diets … Fish oil and heart arrythmia

Q: What is an elimination diet? Can it be used for weight loss? 

A: Alicia Romano, MS, RD, CSNC, a registered dietitian/nutritionist with the Frances Stern Nutrition Center who specializes in gastrointestinal diseases and food allergies, answers: “I’m glad you asked this question! Elimination diets are sometimes used as diagnostic or treatment tools. They are not for weight loss.

Portion Tips and Tricks

Using common items makes it easy to know how much food you’re really eating.

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – December 2022

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December 2022 Issue:

Beware of “Health-Washing”

Front-of-package health claims can be helpful—but they can also be misleading. Learn how to tell the difference.

Habitual Coffee Consumption Associated with Health Benefits

A study that followed nearly 400,000 middle-aged individuals in the U.K. for a median of over 10 years found that, compared to individuals who reported drinking less than one cup of coffee a day, drinking four or more eight-ounce cups a day was associated with lower risk of 30 medical conditions.

FDA Proposes New Definition of “Healthy” on Food Packages

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently proposed new draft guidelines for food manufacturers who want to label their products as “healthy.” This term was last defined in the 1990s. According to the FDA, “our current definition permits manufacturers to use the claim ‘healthy’ on some foods that, based on the most up-to-date nutrition.

Preview: Tufts Health & Nutrition, November 2022

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Inside the Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter – November 2022:

  • Give Thanks for Good Health
  • Newsbites: Vitamin D; red meat and CVD risk; psyllium and constipation
  • Grain Products: Don’t be Fooled by Healthy-Sounding Labels!
  • Special Report: Top 3 Reasons to Avoid “Top Foods” Lists
  • Diet and Hemorrhoids
  • Featured Recipe: Fresh Cranberry Orange Relish
  • Ask Tufts Experts: Processed foods; calcium intake

Cardiometabolic Health: 93% Of U.S. Adults Fail Test

Less than 7% of the U.S. adult population has good cardiometabolic health, a devastating health crisis requiring urgent action, according to research led by a team from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in a pioneering perspective on cardiometabolic health trends and disparities published in the July 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Their team also included researchers from Tufts Medical Center.

Researchers evaluated Americans across five components of health: levels of blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol, adiposity (overweight and obesity), and presence or absence of cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke, etc.). They found that only 6.8 percent of U.S. adults had optimal levels of all five components as of 2017-2018.