Tag Archives: Wine

Travel Preview: Discover Germany Switzerland & Austria – October 2022

print-image

Discover Germany – October 2022

In the October issue of Discover Germany, Austria & Switzerland we head to Bavaria to discover the German state’s culinary fare. Furthermore, travel writer Stuart Forster delves deeper into the benefits of saunas and explores how Germany and Austria’s sauna traditions hold up to the rest of Europe.

Other topics covered in our latest issue are an interview with soap star Iris Mareike Steen, top seasonal wine picks, modern fashion that reinvents traditional German outfits, including the dirndl, a special focus on one of the DACH region’s most famous breweries,

Germany’s top film production and film processing companies, a look at interior design and architecture trends, the cybersecurity and biotechnology sectors in Germany, and much more.

Previews: Food & Wine Magazine – October 2022

Coveroct22fw emma
Cover image by Ruth Calder-Potts

What’s inside the October 2022 issue of Food&Wine Magazine

This month our cover story features Rod and Julie Calder-Potts of Highbank Orchards in Kilkenny, who discuss the highs and lows of running Europe’s only fully organic orchard and apple-based business. They reveal why they finally decided to take the plunge into becoming an entirely organic business and the challenges the move presented.

In spirits, Oisin Davis talks to Justin Green of Ballyhovan House about autumn-inspired spirits as well as the fruition of his new business venture into the glorious world of gin.

Rounding out our issue, for this month’s Secret Restaurateur column, our industry insider deliberates the increasing struggles of running a restaurant and the harsh reality many restaurant owners have and continue to face.

Last but certainly not least, the highlight of our culinary calendar is The Food&Wine Restaurant of the Year awards in association with Rémy Martin. Taking place in the Round Room at Dublin’s Mansion House it’s a celebration of the exceptional talent, resilience and determination of the Irish food and drinks sector. You can buy tickets here and make sure to keep up with the countdown to the event via the hashtag #ROTYA2022 on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

Travel & Culture: The Bordeaux Wine Region

The world’s finest wines, sweeping vineyards and fine food couple with a river valley dotted with castles. We sample the best Bordeaux then cruise the lovely Dordogne and Lot rivers with stops at chateaux, ancient watermills, and perched villages.

The wine regions of Bordeaux are a large number of wine growing areas, differing widely in size and sometimes overlapping, which lie within the overarching wine region of Bordeaux, centred on the city of  Bordeaux  and covering the whole area of the  Gironde  department  of  Aquitaine.

The Bordeaux region is naturally divided by the Gironde Estuary into a Left Bank area which includes the Médoc and Graves and a Right Bank area which includes the Libournais, Bourg and Blaye. The Médoc is itself divided into Haut-Médoc (the upstream or southern portion) and Bas-Médoc (the downstream or northern portion, often referred to simply as “Médoc”).

Infographic: America’s Top Drinks & Beverages

France: The 161st Annual Hospices de Beaune Charity Wine Auction

The Hospices de Beaune or Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune is a former charitable almshouse in Beaune, France. It was founded in 1443 by Nicolas Rolin, chancellor of Burgundy, as a hospital for the poor.

Ahead of the 161st annual Hospices de Beaune charity wine auction, hear about the altruistic history behind this auspicious charity sale, and how the funds raised are looking to the future. In this interview with Francois Poher (Director, Hospices Civils de Beaune) and Ludivine Griveau (Manager, Hospices de Beaune Domaine), learn about the founding of the Hospices de Beaune in the 15th century, as a hospital for the local community. Over the course of time, vineyards were donated by grateful patients and the wine produced has been sold to fund new, state of the art hospitals and technologies. Sotheby’s is proud to host the 161st Edition of the auction, which will be held at the Halles de Beaune on 21 November, the third Sunday in November, as per tradition.

Morning News: Crisis In Tunisia, Vatican Trial, Climate-Changed Wine

The president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. It is clear that the country needed a shake-up in its hidebound politics—but is this the right way? 

A sprawling trial starting today involving the most senior Catholic-church official ever indicted is sure to cast light on the Vatican’s murky finances. And how climate change is already changing winemaking.

Analysis: Why California Winemakers Go Public

Two California wine companies are going public this spring, the first major wineries to do so since the late 1990s. Winemakers explain the lessons of past stock offerings from wineries like Mondavi and Ravenswood and why they think the time is now right to join the IPO fray. Photo: Jake Nicol/WSJ

Fermentation: What To Know About ‘Yeast’ (Video)

Whether you’re making a recipe for cinnamon rolls or French bread, yeast factors into the equation. Yeast is a required ingredient for almost all bread recipes. While we typically just buy yeast at the grocery store and toss it in our mixing bowl, yeast has quite an interesting backstory.

Yeast are fungi, living organisms found all around us, floating in the air. According to producer Red Star Yeast, yeast is made up of egg-shaped cells, only visible through a microscope. They’re fungi just like the molds found on blue cheese, mushrooms, or even in antibiotics such as penicillin. However, yeast grows in a different form than other fungi, which are typically composed of tubular chains of cells called hyphae. Yeast is found in small clusters of cells, or as an individual cell. And since it’s alive, yeast can also die.

According to Red Star Yeast, their yeast is stamped with a best by date of two years from when the yeast is packaged. Keeping it in a cool, dry place such as your pantry or refrigerator will ensure it’ll live up to that date. If you’re not sure if your yeast is alive, pour it over warm water with a teaspoon of sugar. If it bubbles, it’s still kicking, The Spruce Eats advises.

Also? Yeast has been around for longer than pretty much any of us. In researching the ancient tomb of the Egyptian ruler Scorpion from around 3100 B.C., archaeologists found 700 jars of resinated wine. According to Scientific American, the resin was used to slow the wine’s natural progression into vinegar. Researchers found evidence of the same species as modern-day brewer’s yeast in the jars. While that isn’t solid evidence the ancient Egyptians knew that the addition of yeast could turn their juice into alcohol, it certainly does show that yeast has been prevalent for a very, very long time.

Timeline: It’s alive, and ancient | 0:00 Hundreds of varieties | 1:52 Commercial production | 2:38 Adult beverages | 3:24 Ooh, that smell | 4:36 The amount makes a difference | 5:30 Yeast-free bread | 6:17 Sourdough starter is DIY yeast | 7:01 2020’s yeast shortage | 7:45

Study: “Anti-Inflamatory” Diet Of Vegetables, Fruits, Coffee & Tea Lowers Heart Disease And Stroke Risks

Dietary patterns with a higher proinflammatory potential were associated with higher CVD risk. Reducing the inflammatory potential of the diet may potentially provide an effective strategy for CVD prevention.

Background

Inflammation plays an important role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) development. Diet modulates inflammation; however, it remains unknown whether dietary patterns with higher inflammatory potential are associated with long-term CVD risk.

Read full study

Culture Podcast: “Wine Windows Of Florence” Date Back To 17th Century

In the era of social distancing, Italians in Florence have revived the custom of serving wine through pint-size windows in centuries-old buildings.

Year 2020: The covid-19 pandemic arrives. Italy is under lockdown starting March 8th. Everyone is confined to home for two months and then the government permits a gradual reopening. During this time, some enterprising Florentine Wine Window owners have turned back the clock and are using their Wine Windows to dispense glasses of wine, cups of coffee, drinks, sandwiches and ice cream—all germ-free, contactless!

Year 1634: The Black Death or Plague has passed through the city of Florence, leaving death and havoc in its wake. The Florentine scholar, Francesco Rondinelli, writes a report about disease contagion and describes the use of the abundant Wine Windows in the city for the safe sale of wine, without direct contact between client and seller. Diletta Corsini describes this important document regarding Wine Windows and their uses almost 400 years ago.

Website