Category Archives: Events

Remembering 9/11: How It Unfolded 20 Years Ago

France: The 161st Annual Hospices de Beaune Charity Wine Auction

The Hospices de Beaune or Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune is a former charitable almshouse in Beaune, France. It was founded in 1443 by Nicolas Rolin, chancellor of Burgundy, as a hospital for the poor.

Ahead of the 161st annual Hospices de Beaune charity wine auction, hear about the altruistic history behind this auspicious charity sale, and how the funds raised are looking to the future. In this interview with Francois Poher (Director, Hospices Civils de Beaune) and Ludivine Griveau (Manager, Hospices de Beaune Domaine), learn about the founding of the Hospices de Beaune in the 15th century, as a hospital for the local community. Over the course of time, vineyards were donated by grateful patients and the wine produced has been sold to fund new, state of the art hospitals and technologies. Sotheby’s is proud to host the 161st Edition of the auction, which will be held at the Halles de Beaune on 21 November, the third Sunday in November, as per tradition.

Venice Views: ‘Vogalonga’ Rowing Regatta Returns

Colorful boats fill Venice as the Vogalonga returns after getting canceled last year.

The Vogalonga

The Vogalonga is a non-competitive celebration for all rowers.
This peaceful protest against wave damage caused by motor boats, and lagoon degeneration,
brings together Venetians and enthusiasts from around the world.

London: ‘Tate Modern’ Museum Turns 21 (Video)

Tate Modern was opened on 11 May 2000 by Her Majesty the Queen, on the site of Bankside’s converted power station. To mark Tate Modern’s 21st birthday, we’re celebrating 21 years of Tate Modern’s iconic Turbine Hall at the heart of the gallery, which has hosted some of the world’s most memorable and renowned works of contemporary art. From Louise Bourgeois’ mammoth spider and Carsten Höller’s silver slides to Olafur Eliasson’s glowing sun and Ai Weiwei’s sea of sunflower seeds, the way artists have continually transformed this vast industrial space has revolutionised how we perceive contemporary art.

Performances: ‘Three Divas Live In Concert’

On May 22, sopranos Ailyn Pérez and Nadine Sierra join forces with mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard for a concert of popular arias and ensembles, live from France’s Opéra Royal du Château de Versailles. Tickets on sale now.

Earth Day – April 22, 2021: ‘Our Planet, Our Home’

NASA Earth science studies our planet all day, every day. By tracking the movement of our natural systems – and the effect of human activity on them – we can understand the patterns, causes and results of climate change on the elemental activities that sustain us.

On Earth Day, April 22, we take time to celebrate this wondrous planet with special discussions, events (virtual) and activities. Like our satellites, however, NASA’s Earth science goes on year-round, and we continuously create videos, activities, news and more to tell the story of what’s happening on and with our planet – and all always offered free and open to the public.

For the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day in 2020, NASA created a special package of materials designed to mark Earth Day at Home. This included activities, videos, special programs and other materials in English and Spanish. You can find them all archived here.

Views: ‘Venice Carnival 2021’ Mask Revelers (Video)

Protective face masks were swapped for traditional ones in a muted start to the Venice Carnival on St. Mark’s Square on Sunday.

The Carnival of Venice (Italian: Carnevale di Venezia) is an annual festival held in Venice, Italy. The carnival ends with the Christian celebration of Lent, forty days before Easter, on Shrove Tuesday (Martedì Grasso or Mardi Gras), the day before Ash Wednesday. The festival is world-famous for its elaborate masks.

Catastrophic Events: History’s ’15 Largest Tidal Waves & Tsunamies’ (Video)

The largest tidal waves, tsunamis, and other types of waves throughout history. Never turn your back to the sea.

  • #1 Lituya Bay, Alaska – On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle loosened about 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock high above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. This mass of rock plunged from an altitude of approximately 3000 feet (914 meters) down into the waters of Gilbert Inlet (see map below). The impact force of the rockfall generated a local tsunami that crashed against the southwest shoreline of Gilbert Inlet. The wave hit with such power that it swept completely over the spur of land that separates Gilbert Inlet from the main body of Lituya Bay. The wave then continued down the entire length of Lituya Bay, over La Chaussee Spit and into the Gulf of Alaska. The force of the wave removed all trees and vegetation from elevations as high as 1720 feet (524 meters) above sea level. Millions of trees were uprooted and swept away by the wave. This is the highest wave that has ever been known.
  • #2 Krakatoa tsunami – The 27 August 1883 explosion of Krakatau Volcano in Indonesia is one example of an eruption-caused tsunami. The eruption generated a 30m tsunami in the Sunda Strait which killed about 36,000 people, as it washed away 165 coastal villages on Java and Sumatra.
  • #3 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami occurred at 07:58:53 in local time on 26 December, with an epicentre off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia. It was an undersea megathrust earthquake that registered a magnitude of 9.1–9.3 Mw, reaching a Mercalli intensity up to IX in certain areas.