Tag Archives: The Guardian Weekly

Previews: The Guardian Weekly, November 25, 2022

Cop27's climate anticlimax: inside the 25 November Guardian Weekly | Cop27  | The Guardian

Cop27’s climate anticlimax: inside the 25 November Guardian Weekly | Cop27 | The Guardian

Cop27 ended in a now-traditional blur of last-minute horse-trading, resulting in the welcome agreement of a finance deal for developing countries affected by global heating. But progress on eliminating fossil fuel usage – the key to slowing climate change – again seemed beyond the international community.

As winter descends on Ukraine, we focus on some of the war’s ripples around Europe. Jennifer Rankin reports from Antwerp, where the continued trade in Russian diamonds shines a light on loopholes in EU sanctions on Moscow. And Emma Graham-Harrison is in eastern Poland, where people’s proximity to the war is helping people to put aside past differences.

Then, in features, Luke Harding speaks to the Ukrainian defenders of Snake Island – who famously sent an expletive-laden rebuttal to a Russian warship at the start of the conflict – and finds out what happened next.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly, November 18, 2022

The cover of the 18 November edition of the Guardian Weekly.

The Guardian Weekly – November 18, 2022 issue:

Qatar’s World Cup of Woe

Ordinarily a football World Cup would be a moment for celebration, a time to savour sport’s power to unite nations and a glorious distraction from the problems of the day. Not this time: the 2022 tournament has been mired in controversy since it was awarded to Qatar 12 years ago.

Another dubious global milestone was reached this week as the world’s population passed 8 billion, according to UN estimates. In a the first of a series of dispatches from the frontline of population growth, Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports from India, which next year will overtake China as the planet’s most populous nation, on what the shift means for the world.

The US midterm elections saw the Democrats fare better than expected, retaining control of the Senate despite looking likely to lose control of the House by a small margin to the Republicans. The more consequential outcome may be for Donald Trump: Chris McGreal and David Smith ask if the former president’s grip on the GOP is weakening, and if his rival Ron DeSantis’s time may be coming.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly November 11, 2022

The cover of the 11 November edition of the Guardian Weekly.

The Guardian Weekly, November 11, 2022:

Benjamin Netanyahu is nothing if not a fighter. Having been ousted as Israel’s prime minister a year ago by an alliance of political foes and now embroiled in a corruption trial (he denies all charges), one might have thought the 73-year-old’s career was up. 

The Cop27 climate talks got under way in Egypt, as debate raged over the agenda as well as a furore over hosting the event in a country where political and human rights are a live issue. Environment editor Fiona Harvey explains what the talks – which run until 18 November – can hope to achieve, amid a slew of alarming reports about the rate of global heating.

This week’s magazine went to press too soon to feature news of the US midterm elections – there’ll be plenty on that in the next edition. In the meantime, Leyland Cecco reports from Canada, where there are claims China is operating a chain of clandestine police stations to keep tabs on its diaspora.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – November 4, 2022

Inside Guardian Weekly – For readers of the Guardian Weekly magazine’s North American edition this week, the cover focuses on the Democrats’ precarious hopes in the midterm elections. Elsewhere, the spotlight shines on the Cop27 climate summit in Egypt.

The US midterm elections next week could see a Republican party still dominated by Donald Trump gain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate. David Smith asks whether an intervention by former president Barack Obama could give a late kickstart to the Democrats’ hopes.

Cautious optimism followed the last Cop conference in Glasgow, where an international roadmap was agreed to keep the world within 1.5C of global heating. On the eve of this year’s summit, however, a slew of alarming reports have shown that carbon emissions are still rising.

Politics: The Guardian Weekly – October 28, 2022

The cover of the 28 October edition of the Guardian Weekly.

The Guardian – Inside the October 28, 2022 Issue:

Britain’s political fever dream continued apace this week as Rishi Sunak became prime minister without anyone even voting for him. The former chancellor, the country’s third prime minister in less than two months and the fifth in six years, is also the UK’s first leader of colour and the first Hindu to take the office.

Jonathan Freedland considers how big a blow Truss’s ill-judged stint in power has delivered to the school of neoliberal economic thought.

Brazil also faces a judgment day this weekend, as Jair Bolsonaro and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva square up in a presidential runoff of deep significance for the country and the planet, with the protection of the Amazon at stake. The outcome is on such a knife-edge that not even the nation’s gangsters can decide who to vote for, as our Latin America correspondent Tom Phillips reports.

On the subject of the environment, don’t miss Naomi Klein’s long read about how Egypt’s government has used the coming Cop27 conference to greenwash its own oppressive political activities.

Then, there’s a revealing interview with Chelsea Manning, who opens up to Emma Brockes on what really happened when she leaked thousands of classified US military documents.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – October 21, 2022

Guardian Weekly cover 21 October 2022

Living with long Covid. Plus Xi Jinping’s historic party congress

The October 21, 2022 cover story this week steps back from the news agenda to explore the impact of living with long Covid. For millions of people worldwide who have survived initial infection with the virus, recovery is slow. Symptoms such as breathlessness, fatigue and loss of smell or taste persist for months and, as our science editor Ian Sample explains, treatments that work for some may not be successful for others.

This week delegates to the Chinese Communist party’s 20th congress are in Beijing where they are expected to rubber stamp Xi Jinping’s historic third term as leader. Our big story looks at what the president’s supremacy means for the country and its closest neighbour – Taiwan – which lives in the shadow of Xi’s avowed intention to bring the island back under China’s tutelage. 

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – October 14, 2022

The cover of the 14 October edition of the Guardian Weekly.

Rebellion in Iran: Inside the 14 October Guardian Weekly

The women and girls facing down Iran’s leaders. Plus: Putin strikes back

For the past few weeks, nationwide protests have gripped Iran after the death in police custody of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Kurdish woman who had been detained for breaching Islamic dress codes.

Details of what is happening inside the country remain patchy, but social media footage suggests action has been substantial, resulting in mass arrests and scores of deaths. Yet Iran’s repressive state apparatus has not been able to quell the unrest or diminish the morale of protesters, many of whom are young women and schoolgirls.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – Sept 16, 2022

The cover of the 16 September edition of the Guardian Weekly.

After Elizabeth: Inside the 16 September Guardian Weekly

Reflections on the end of a royal era, and the ascent of King Charles III
Regardless of whether one identifies as royalist or republican, it’s virtually impossible to dispute the global significance of Queen Elizabeth II, who died last week aged 96

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – September 2, 2022

The cover of the 2 September edition of the Guardian Weekly.

Burn out: Inside the 2 September Guardian Weekly

The spiralling cost of living has been an increasingly urgent problem in the UK. But for many people, huge rises in energy bills are about to turn a difficult situation into an impossible one.

Preview: The Guardian Weekly – August 26, 2022

The cover of the 26 August edition of the Guardian Weekly.

Life and death: Inside the 26 August Guardian Weekly

Six months of hell in Ukraine. Plus: recession stalks Europe.

The troop buildups, the belligerent speeches, the excruciatingly staged Kremlin policy meetings … for months, the signs had been there in plain sight. Nonetheless, the order in the early hours of 24 February from Vladimir Putin to invade Ukraine came as a lightning bolt, one that would change Europe for years to come.