Tag Archives: Foreign Affairs

Previews: Foreign Affairs Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

November/December 2022

Inside Foreign Affairs November/December 2022 issue:

The World According to Xi Jinping

What China’s Ideologue in Chief Really Believes

Russia’s Dangerous Decline

The Kremlin Won’t Go Down Without a Fight

The Sources of Russian Misconduct

A Diplomat Defects From the Kremlin

Foreign Affairs: The U.S. Vs China Military Bases (WSJ)

Wall Street Journal – The U.S. operates hundreds of foreign military bases. China has only one, but military experts say Beijing is also leveraging over 90 commercial ports. WSJ unpacks what’s on these bases and the countries’ differing strategies to expand their global footprint.

Analysis: How Taiwan Is Facing Threat From China

Taiwan is a democracy with a strong human rights record and a high standard of living. But despite the country’s economic strength and elected government, the island state struggles to receive international recognition. Even in terms of corruption, Taiwan’s track record is better than that of some European states.

The problem is that Beijing regards democratic Taiwan, which seceded from the mainland in 1949, as a renegade province rather than an independent state. China is trying to isolate it internationally. Many fear that China has plans to attack Taiwan in the near future: The President of the People’s Republic of China, Xi Jinping, has made it clear that his country is prepared to claim the island by military means. Beijing has been adopting this threatening stance for decades.

Thus far, the goal has been to annex the island to the mainland at some undefined point in the future. China’s historically questionable worldview would see this as reunification; from Taiwan’s perspective, it would be annexation. Both countries are highly armed – a war would inevitably cost many people their lives.

The film throws open a window on a nation that has been in a state of existential threat for decades; a country that is home to people who will defend their freedom at all costs – and also those who yearn for an imminent annexation with China.

Previews: Foreign Affairs Magazine – Sept/Oct 2022

September/October 2022

Foreign Affairs at 100 – The Magazine Marks a Century

September/October 2022

The Beginning of History

Surviving the Era of Catastrophic Risk – By William MacAskill

The Dangerous Decade – A Foreign Policy for a World in Crisis By Richard Haass

Preview: The Economist Magazine – August 27, 2022

Are sanctions working?

Are sanctions working?

Read full edition

Documentary: Lebanon’s Historic Economic Crisis

Lebanon is now going through the worst economic crisis in its history. 80 per cent of the population lives below the poverty line. In one year, food prices have jumped 500 per cent due to galloping inflation. Lebanon was long regarded as the Switzerland of the Middle East.

But those days are gone. A series of crises have plunged the nation into the abyss. And its people are suffering. For Riad, who runs a grocery store in the suburbs of Beirut, business has become hellish. Every morning, calculator in hand, he changes the labels of his products according to the day’s exchange rate. An operation made all the more complex by the fact that his store is plunged into darkness, due to a lack of electricity.

The Lebanese government no longer provides more than two hours of electricity per day in the country. It is impossible for the population to heat, light or use their refrigerators. Taking advantage of the situation, a network of private generators has emerged. The Lebanese pound, the local currency, has lost 90 per cent of its value.

The only people unaffected are those paid in dollars. The greenback, which can be exchanged for a small fortune against the local currency, has created a new privileged social class in the country. A salesman in an international pharmaceutical company, Joseph lives like a king in a ruined Lebanon. Thanks to his new purchasing power, he repaid his mortgage in two months, instead of… twenty years!

In a bankrupt state, plagued by corruption, six out of ten Lebanese now dream of leaving the country. In Tripoli, in northern Lebanon, Mohammed and his son set out for Germany by sea. Even though the trip was cut short off the Turkish coast, the young father is still ready to take all possible risks to reach the European Eldorado.

Analysis: Open-Source Intelligence, Stablecoins, Predicting New Viruses

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, open-source intelligence comes of age, why regulators should treat stablecoins like banks (10:50) and how predicting viral evolution may let vaccines be prepared in advance (17:00).

Politics: Biden’s China Doctrine, South Africa, Carbon Border Taxes

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Biden’s new China doctrine, a jailed ex-president won’t go quietly in South Africa (8:44), and carbon border taxes (14:32). 

News: China’s Communist Party At 100 – What’s Next?

At the Chinese Communist Party’s centennial celebration, President Xi Jinping called for defiance against foreign pressure. As China challenges the U.S.’s leadership – from AI to defense – WSJ’s Jonathan Cheng looks at what’s next for the country. Photo: Wang Zhao/AFP