Tag Archives: Bolivia

Cover Previews: World Archaeology – Sept 2022

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The World Archaeology October 2022 issue explores the secrets of Japan’s stone circles, the lost prehistoric cities of Bolivia, women’s everyday lives in the Ice Age, an idyllic alpine region that saw fierce fighting during the First World War, and much more.

The stone circles of Japan are enigmatic monuments. These structures were created by Jomon hunter-gatherers, mostly from roughly 2500-300 BC, and can be associated with burials, seasonal ceremonies, and solar alignments. Such preoccupations are far from being restricted to Jomon Japan, with study of these circles proving influential when it came to early 20th-century attempts to understand Stonehenge. In our cover feature, we take a detailed look at some of the Jomon stone circles, examining both the monuments themselves, and wider activity in the period.

Views: Two Andean Condors Released Back Into The Wild In Bolivia

The Andean condor is a South American bird in the New World vulture family Cathartidae and is the only member of the genus Vultur. Found in the Andes mountains and adjacent Pacific coasts of western South America, the Andean condor is the largest flying bird in the world by combined measurement of weight and wingspan. Two Andean condors were released back to the wild in the mountains of Bolivia after they were nursed back to health.

Views: ‘The Andes’ In Western South America

The Andes, running along South America’s western side, is among the world’s longest mountain ranges. Its varied terrain encompasses glaciers, volcanoes, grassland, desert, lakes and forest. The mountains shelter pre-Columbian archaeological sites and wildlife including chinchillas and condors. From Venezuela in the north, the range passes through Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile. 

Video Highlights 00:55​ – Vinicunca Rainbow Mountain 02:07​ – Monte Fitz Roy 03:36​ – Carunculated caracara bird 05:22​ – Uyuni Salt Flat 06:05​ – Lonquimay Volcano 07:49​ – Maipo Canyon

Timelapse Travel: ‘Lone Peaks’ Of South America

Filmed and Edited by: Florian Nick

From giant icecaps far south to bone-dry deserts further north – I traveled 20.000 km across Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru for six months and was blown away by the variety of landscapes on this continent.

But one thing I found that all these climate zones have in common are those massive mountains rising high above their lands. May it be the majestic granite walls of Patagonia, perfectly shaped volcanos in the Atacama desert or some of the high alpine peaks of the Peruvian highlands.

Even though it only captures very few of them, this short timelapse film is a tribute to all those lone peaks in South America. There is still so many more to discover and photograph.