Category Archives: Lifestyle

Preview: France-Amérique Magazine – September 2022

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Fashion on the High Wire

This month, the world’s greatest couturiers will descend on New York and Paris for Fashion Week. For the occasion we bring you stories about la mode and the people behind it. Read about Lee Miller (“A Fashion Model in Combat Boots”), Condé Nast (“The Man Behind the Empire”), and how young, urban creatives in France and America have adopted le bleu de travail – the French worker’s jacket. Also in this issue, travel to the South of France and the Camargo Foundation, which was created in 1971 by American filmmaker Jerome Hill; read our editorial on the Uberization of the world, and meet Belgian “food alchemist” Pascal Baudar, who spends most of his time in the hills around Los Angeles looking for his next meal: plants, fruit, seeds, grains, and even insects!

Cover: The New York Times Magazine – August 28, 2022

Current cover

The 8.28.22 Issue

Can Coco Gauff the Tennis Prodigy Become a Tennis Legend?

Since Coco Gauff went pro at 14, she has played under the weight of high expectations. Now 18, she has her own measures for greatness.

How a Corporate Law Firm Led a Political Revolution

The untold story of Jones Day’s push to move the American government and courts to the right.

Cover: The New York Times Magazine – August 21, 2022

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Willie Nelson’s Long Encore

As he approaches 90, even brushes with death can’t keep him off the road — or dim a late-life creative burst.

TikTok Audio Memes Are Everywhere. How Do They Work?

Welcome to the era of the audio meme, a time when replicable units of sound are a cultural currency as strong as — if not stronger than — images and text.

Read more: https://nyti.ms/3A6vPOT

Online Exhibitions: ‘Made In Chicago Museum’ (2022)

This short film by Martin Mulcahy was created for the launch of the 2022-23 exhibition of the Made In Chicago Museum, currently running at Klairmont Kollections, 3117 N. Knox Ave., Chicago, IL.

The film, the museum exhibit, and the corresponding online museum, highlight the many “everyday objects” manufactured by Chicago companies between 1900-1970, bringing to life the stories behind them and the legacy of items we might otherwise view as obsolete (or at best, “vintage”).

The Made In Chicago Museum was founded and curated by Andrew Clayman, and design elements of the exhibit, including this short film, are the work of Chicago designer and filmmaker Martin Mulcahy. For more, visit https://www.madeinchicagomuseum.com/

Magazines: The Good Life France – Summer 2022

Front cover of The Good Life France Magazine Summer 2022 issue

The Good Life France Magazine Summer 2022

Discover the intoxicating island of Corsica, a well-kept secret island of beauty where 80% of visitors are from France. Head south to arty Arles, once a Roman colony, adored by artists and now a cultural hotspot, and the wetlands of the Camargue where wild white horses and pink flamingoes roam. We explore gorgeous Antibes on the Mediterranean coast, nothing like its more well known neighbours Nice and Cannes where we also go to find out more about this bucket list beauty. In the north, discover the historic department of Aisne in Picardy – the ancient cradle of France, and Agincourt, a land of glorious countryside and a super museum dedicated to its famous battle.

Urban Living: Are U.S. Big Cities Still Worth It?

A cost-of-living crisis is unfolding in U.S. major cities. Inflation data shows that costs for items such as rent and groceries are increasing quickly across the Sun Belt and coastal superstar cities. Now years removed from the darkest days of the pandemic, people are asking: Is a return to the city worth it?

Metropolitan regions have sprawled in recent years, raising budget concerns and quality-of-life issues for the people who remain downtown. Meanwhile the absence of commuters is slowing the recovery in leisure and hospitality. Many renters believe that a cost-of-living crisis is brewing in America’s major cities.

New York City is showing up as a hotspot of rent inflation. The average rent for 1-bedroom apartments in Manhattan rose to $3,995 a month in May 2022 — a 41% increase from one year ago, according to Zumper. Sudden, double-digit rent spikes are hitting other hubs, including Chicago, Los Angeles, and Austin, Texas. Zumper data shows that growth is particularly strong in Sun Belt cities such as Miami, where rents have risen to $2,700 a month in May 2022, a 64% increase from a year prior. During the pandemic, workers left the largest U.S. cities.

Two years in, renters have returned but many commuters haven’t as companies negotiate the particulars of a return to the office. Public officials are concerned about lagging transit ridership in cities such as New York. Ed Glaeser, an economist at Harvard University, says cities are becoming more important — not less — in the age of remote work. “When you Zoom to work, you miss the opportunity to watch the people who are older, to watch what they’ve done and to learn from them,” he told CNBC in an interview.

But for renters, a return to increasingly expensive cities might seem like a raw deal, especially if they can do their jobs from home. Researchers say remote work limits firms’ ability to train new workers. Data produced by Microsoft’s workforce suggests that it is more difficult to share in-depth information remotely, which can produce silos within companies’ rank and file.

“A lot of these tech companies, they’re saying you can work remotely,” said Andra Ghent, a professor of finance at the University of Utah. “But, you know, in many cases, they’re also saying, like, we’re not going to pay you quite the same amount.” Many renters believe that a cost-of-living crisis is brewing in America’s major cities. New York City is showing up as a hotspot of rent inflation. The average rent for 1-bedroom apartments in Manhattan rose to $3,995 a month in May 2022 — a 41% increase from one year ago, according to Zumper.

Sudden, double-digit rent spikes are hitting other hubs, including Chicago, Los Angeles, and Austin, Texas. Zumper data shows that growth is particularly strong in Sun Belt cities such as Miami, where rents have risen to $2,700 a month in May 2022, a 64% increase from a year prior. During the pandemic, workers left the largest U.S. cities. Two years in, renters have returned but many commuters haven’t as companies negotiate the particulars of a return to the office.

Public officials are concerned about lagging transit ridership in cities such as New York. Ed Glaeser, an economist at Harvard University, says cities are becoming more important — not less — in the age of remote work. “When you Zoom to work, you miss the opportunity to watch the people who are older, to watch what they’ve done and to learn from them,” he told CNBC in an interview. But for renters, a return to increasingly expensive cities might seem like a raw deal, especially if they can do their jobs from home.

Researchers say remote work limits firms’ ability to train new workers. Data produced by Microsoft’s workforce suggests that it is more difficult to share in-depth information remotely, which can produce silos within companies’ rank and file. “A lot of these tech companies, they’re saying you can work remotely,” said Andra Ghent, a professor of finance at the University of Utah. “But, you know, in many cases, they’re also saying, like, we’re not going to pay you quite the same amount.”

U.S. Lifestyle Rankings: The Best Places To Live In 2022

The 10 Best Places to Live in the U.S. in 2022-2023:

1. Huntsville, Alabama
2. Colorado Springs, Colorado
3. Green Bay, Wisconsin
4. Boulder, Colorado
5. San Jose, California
6. Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina
7. Fayetteville, Arkansas
8. Portland, Maine
9. Sarasota, Florida
10. San Francisco

Housing costs are rising fast and there aren’t enough homes on the market nationwide to meet demand, and anyone looking to move is acutely aware of the competition and high cost to buy or rent a home. The Best Places to Live rankings factor in how the cost of living compares to the area’s median household income, but U.S. News & World Report also broke out the data into its own ranking.

London Views: Houseboat Living On Regent’s Canal

From Chelsea to the canals, Londoners are taking to the water in search of a more peaceful way of life on a houseboat. Jo Rodgers clambers aboard.

Not far from World’s End, the Chelsea neighbourhood of 1970s council blocks and top-tier antique dealers, there’s a turn-off toward the Thames that you could pass 100 times without noticing. Next to the Embankment, a pair of planked wooden doors open to a quiet boatyard with a few handfuls of moorings, including the sunny houseboat of Alexandra Pringle, a publisher, and her husband, Rick Stroud, a writer and film-maker. A sturdy green gangway (‘the Waitrose delivery drivers are sometimes very nervous,’ says Alexandra) takes you over the riverbank to a red front door, flanked by hale plants, in terracotta pots and dolly bins, and a brass ship bell.

Loire Valley Views: The Marshes Of Bourges

The city of Bourges in central France is famous for its UNESCO-listed cathedral and medieval city centre. But the capital of the Berry region has another historic asset: its marshes, a labyrinth of vegetable gardens. Located a few minutes from the city centre, the people of Bourges have enthusiastically maintained them for more than a century. This small corner of paradise is now attracting more and more city dwellers looking for peace and quiet. FRANCE 24 takes you to discover this unique but fragile ecosystem.

Culture: France-Amérique Magazine – April 2022

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April 2022

Pretty in… Green

For Earth Day, April 22, France-Amérique is going vert! Did you know the color green was perceived as evil before it was adopted by environmentalists as a symbol of hope and happiness? The environment is also at the heart of #SaccageParis, a French campaign raising awareness on littering, and the work of photographer Ben Thouard, who captures the sheer power of the waves in Tahiti. Also in this issue, read our interview with the former head of U.N. peacekeeping, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, our investigation on the myths and facts of immigration in France, and our illustrated feature on the Coulée Verte in Paris, the urban park that inspired New York’s High Line!

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