Tag Archives: Physics

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – March 4

Cover Preview: Scientific American – February 2022

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – January 15

Front Covers: Scientific American – October 2021

Science: Standard Model Of Physics, Explained

The Standard Model of particle physics is the most successful scientific theory of all time. It describes how everything in the universe is made of 12 different types of matter particles, interacting with 3 forces, all bound together by a rather special particle called the Higgs boson. It’s the pinnacle of 400 years of science, and gives the correct answer to hundreds of thousands of experiments. In this explainer, Cambridge physicist David Tong creates the model, piece by piece, to provide some intuition for how all of the parts fit together to create the fundamental building blocks of our universe. At the end of the video, he also points out what’s missing from the model, and what work is left to do in order to complete the Theory of Everything.

Technology: Quantum Computers, Explained

Quantum computers aren’t the next generation of supercomputers—they’re something else entirely. Before we can even begin to talk about their potential applications, we need to understand the fundamental physics that drives the theory of quantum computing. (Featuring Scott Aaronson, John Preskill, and Dorit Aharonov.) For more, read “Why Quantum Computers Are So Hard to Explain”: https://www.quantamagazine.org/why-is…

Theorectical Physics: The ‘Constructor Theory’ Of Oxford’s Chiara Marletto

“Declaring something impossible leads to more things being possible,” writes the physicist Chiara Marletto. “Bizarre as it may seem, it is commonplace in quantum physics.”

Chiara Marletto is trying to build a master theory — a set of ideas so fundamental that all other theories would spring from it. Her first step: Invoke the impossible.

Constructor Theory is a new approach to formulating fundamental laws in physics. Instead of describing the world in terms of trajectories, initial conditions and dynamical laws, in constructor theory laws are about which physical transformations are possible and which are impossible, and why. This powerful switch has the potential to bring all sorts of interesting fields, currently regarded as inherently approximative, into fundamental physics. These include the theories of information, knowledge, thermodynamics, and life.

Read more about Marletto and David Deutsch’s constructor theory at Quanta Magazine: https://www.quantamagazine.org/how-to…

Analysis: How ‘Physics’ & Rising Tides Freed Cargo Ship In The Suez Canal

It took seven days, heavy machinery and an international team of salvage workers, but it the end it was a force of nature – rising tides – that helped finally free the #Ever#Given​ cargo ship a week after it got stuck in the #Suez#Canal​ and blocked one of the world’s busiest waterways.

Wildlife Insider: ‘The Archerfish – A Master Hunter With Physics’

The mangroves of Sri Lanka are home to a very special resident. The archerfish might not look that powerful, but it can fire watery arrows to take down its prey from up to two meters away. In this video, we’ll show you the archerfish’s unique hunting strategy, which also involves an astonishing grasp of physics and math. Behind those dual-action eyes, complex calculations are going on…

Profile: 2004 Nobel Prize Physicist Frank Wilczek – ‘Strong Force Theory’

In 1972, Frank Wilczek and his thesis adviser, David Gross, discovered the basic theory of the strong force — the final pillar of the Standard Model of particle physics. Their work revealed the strange alchemy at work inside the nucleus of an atom. It also turned out to underpin almost all subsequent research into the early universe. Wilczek and Gross went on to share the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics for the work. At the time it was done, Wilczek was just 21 years old. His influence in the decades since has been profound. He predicted the existence of a hypothetical particle called the axion, which today is a leading candidate for dark matter. He published groundbreaking papers on the nature of the early universe. And just last year, his prediction of the “anyon” — a strange type of particle that only shows up in two-dimensional systems — was experimentally confirmed.