Tag Archives: Women

Arts&Culture: Humanities Magazine – Winter 2023

Humanities | The National Endowment for the Humanities

HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Humanities (Winter 2023) Issue:

Gabrielle Suchon, Philosopher Queen of the Amazons

Illustration of Gabrielle Suchon

Centuries before the rise of feminism, this underappreciated thinker wrote to set women free

What Are Toys For?

wooden minimalist rocking horse

A visit to the Strong Museum

La Malinche, Hernan Cortés’s Translator and So Much More

The disputed legacy of an Indigenous icon

How the Drug War Convinced America to Wiretap the Digital Revolution

Operation Root Canal

When Illinois Joined the Union, Its Capital Was Kaskaskia

Illinois

Foreign Affairs Magazine: The Best Articles Of 2022

Foreign Affairs (December 23, 2022) – Editors’ Top Picks from print and the web:

The Sources of Russian Misconduct

A Diplomat Defects From the Kremlin

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2022

Revenge of the Patriarchs

Why Autocrats Fear Women

MARCH/APRIL 2022

Nobody Wants the Current World Order

How All the Major Powers—Even the United States—Became Revisionists

AUGUST 3, 2022

READ MORE

Previews: History Today Magazine – November 2022

Nov 22

Tutankhamun in the Flesh

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922 reopened arguments about the presumed race of the ancient Egyptians.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s Second Act

After the death of her husband in 1945, Eleanor Roosevelt left the White House and embarked upon a new career as  ‘First Lady of the World’.

‘The Vote is of the People’

Brazilian democracy is young, hard-won and under threat. As the country goes to the polls, its history reminds us that the right to vote is not a given.

Women, Life, Freedom

Iranian women have always been present in national uprisings, but this time they are leading them.

Political Analysis: Bitter Legacy Of 9/11, Nations Failing Women & Pottery

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America then and now: the bitter legacy of 9/11. Why nations that fail women fail, (9:42) and a forgotten revolution in pottery (17:58) 

Views: Anthropologist Jane Goodall Still Has Hope For Humanity (NYT)

Top Women: Inside Forbes 2021 ’50 Over 50′ List (Video)

For these dynamic women, growing older is about getting wiser—and bolder. Meet the inaugural class of entrepreneurs, leaders and creators who are part of an exhilarating movement redefining life’s second half and proving that success has no age limit.

Selected from a pool of more than 10,000 nominees, the members of the 50 Over 50 are founding and running companies at scale ($20 million or more in revenue for for-profit companies), leading movements and changing the world. They’re working across all sectors of the American economy—venture capital, education, politics, major league sports and more—and, importantly, they’re paying forward their after-50 success.

In a moment when a global pandemic has pushed a disproportionate number of women out of the workforce—and, among this demographic, forced hundreds of thousands into too-early retirements—it is our hope that the stories of the women on this list resonate, inform and inspire.

Read the full profile on Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/50over50/

Cocktails With A Curator: Italian Painter Rosalba Carriera’s Portraits

In this week’s “Cocktails with a Curator,” Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon celebrates Women’s History Month by examining two exquisite pastels by Rosalba Carriera that recently entered the collection through a bequest from Alexis Gregory and are on view for the first time on the third floor of Frick Madison. Celebrated for her technically innovative pastel portraits, Rosalba was one of the most famous artists of 18th-century Italy, particularly remarkable given the male-dominated society in which she lived. This week’s complementary cocktail is the Vesper Martini.

To view these paintings in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/rosalbaportraits

Culture: ‘Guinea-Bissau – A Matriarchy Rules’ (Video)

A matriarchy rules on one of the Bijagos Islands off the coast of Guinea-Bissau. The tribe of the same name lives on Orango, one of the most populated islands in the archipelago. Women dominate public and private life there. This documentary focuses on the women of the Bijagos tribe of Guinea-Bissau. Unlike many women in traditional and modern societies elsewhere, they pick their husbands, propose marriage and own their homes.

In addition to being responsible for raising children, they also act as high-priestesses in animist ceremonies, organize work, guard the keys to the rice stores, lead their families and ensure there are descendants to continue the line. The Bijagos revere women, who are believed to be in charge of the balance between the worlds of the living and the dead. A matriarchy of this kind is unusual, not only for Africa but around the world. Even though this culture has persisted for centuries, aspects of Western lifestyles are starting to gain a foothold. Rising rates of school attendance could contribute to the demise of the community’s traditions. Future generations will determine whether the Bijagos can retain their culture.

Guinea-Bissau is a tropical country on West Africa’s Atlantic coast that’s known for national parks and wildlife. The forested, sparsely populated Bijagós archipelago is a protected biosphere reserve. Its main island, Bubaque, forms part of the Orango Islands National Park, a habitat for saltwater hippos. On the mainland, the capital, Bissau, is a port with Portuguese colonial buildings in its old city center. 

Interviews: Ballet Dancer Misty Copeland (Podcast)

Was the first black principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre earlier denied roles because of her skin colour? She tells host, Anne McElvoy, how dance saved her from a difficult childhood and about her first performance in a classic Christmas production. And, which ballets would she remove from the repertoire?

Misty Danielle Copeland is an American ballet dancer for American Ballet Theatre, one of the three leading classical ballet companies in the United States. On June 30, 2015, Copeland became the first African American woman to be promoted to principal dancer in ABT’s 75-year history