Tag Archives: Cover Previews

Preview: The New Yorker Magazine – Sept 12, 2022

A crew films a very small dog in the middle of a bustling movie set.

George Balanchine’s Soviet Reckoning

New York City Ballet’s 1962 tour of the U.S.S.R. forced the great choreographer to confront the regime he’d fled and the people he’d left behind.

John Cuneo’s “Top Dog”

The artist discusses canine stars, his first trip abroad, and keeping a sense of the spontaneous in his work.

Cover Preview: Harper’s Magazine – July 2022

Empire Burlesque by Daniel Bessner

What comes after the American Century?

In February 1941, as Adolf Hitler’s armies prepared to invade the Soviet Union, the Republican oligarch and publisher Henry Luce laid out a vision for global domination in an article titled the american century. World War II, he argued, was the result of the United States’ immature refusal to accept the mantle of world leadership after the British Empire had begun to deteriorate in the wake of World War I. American foolishness, the millionaire claimed, had provided space for Nazi Germany’s rise. The only way to rectify this mistake and prevent future conflict was for the United…

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Cover Preview: Outdoor Photography – June 2022

Outdoor Photography 282 Cover

In Outdoor Photography issue 280

Chris Frost captures the magic of Dorset’s hidden woods
Essential tips for successful mountain photography
James Roddie introduces the art of camera trapping
Vincent Munier discusses his stunning new nature film

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Covers: National Wildlife Magazine – June/July 2022

National Wildlife magazine June-July 2022 cover featuring Rock Harbor

June–July 2022 – The Fresh Water Issue: Saving The Stuff Of Life

  • Lisa Moore, Editorial Director
  • National Wildlife
  • Jun 10, 2022

On the cover: Surrounded by the waters of Lake Superior, Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park is a roadless haven for wildlife. Photo by Viktor Posnov

Preview: The New Yorker Magazine – May 23, 2022


An illustration of a cat with its claws reaching out.

Ana Juan’s “Making Mischief” – The artist discusses cats, letting fate choose a pet, and spirit animals.

By Françoise Mouly, Art by Ana Juan, May 16, 2022

It is thought that cats lived alongside people for thousands of years, hunting the rodents that inevitably accompany human settlements, before they deigned to become domesticated—a state that many cat owners can attest feels provisional to this day. One research paper on the history of the house cat observes, “Let us just say that our cats do not take instruction well. Such attributes suggest that whereas other domesticates were recruited from the wild by humans who bred them for specific tasks, ancestors of domestic cats most likely chose to live among humans because of opportunities they found for themselves.” 

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Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – May 16, 2022

Barron’s Magazine, May 16, 2022 – How Workers Gained Leverage, and Why They Won’t Lose It Soon

Employees in many industries have seized on the pandemic’s upheaval to score higher pay, better benefits, flexible schedules, and more. While some gains will fade, a number of economic and demographic forces suggest workers have the edge.

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – May 13, 2022

A survey of cell types across tissues as part of the Human Cell Atlas, mapped with single-cell transcriptomics in three papers in this issue, lays the foundation for understanding how cellular composition and gene expression vary across the human body in health, and for understanding how genes act in disease. 

Cover Previews: Nature Magazine – May 12, 2022

Volume 605 Issue 7909

Nova explosions occur when a runaway thermonuclear reaction is triggered in a white dwarf that is accreting hydrogen from a companion star. The massive amount of energy released ultimately creates the bright light source that can be seen with a naked eye as a nova. But some of the energy has been predicted to be lost during the initial stages of the reaction as a flash of intense luminosity — a fireball phase — detectable as low-energy X-rays. In this week’s issue, Ole König and his colleagues present observations that corroborate this prediction. Using scans taken by the instrument eROSITA, the researchers identified a short, bright X-ray flash from the nova YZ Reticuli a few hours before it became visible in the optical spectrum. The cover shows an artist’s impression of the nova in the fireball phase.