Tag Archives: International

French Views: The History Of The Ladurée Macaron

Insider Food (December 17, 2022) – From the big screen to fashion catwalks, the French macaron has become a pop culture icon. And it’s thanks to Ladurée, the French company credited with inventing the colorful cookie over 130 years ago. Today, Laudrée has turned its colorful macarons into a cookie empire.

Analysis: The World Ahead 2023 – The Economist

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Ten trends to watch in the coming year

A letter from Tom Standage, editor of “The World Ahead 2023”

1. All eyes on Ukraine. Energy prices, inflation, interest rates, economic growth, food shortages—all depend on how the conflict plays out in the coming months. Rapid progress by Ukraine could threaten Vladimir Putin, but a grinding stalemate seems the most likely outcome. Russia will try to string out the conflict in the hope that energy shortages, and political shifts in America, will undermine Western support for Ukraine.

2. Recessions loom. Major economies will go into recession as central banks raise interest rates to stifle inflation, an after-effect of the pandemic since inflamed by high energy prices. America’s recession should be relatively mild; Europe’s will be more brutal. The pain will be global as the strong dollar hurts poor countries already hit by soaring food prices.

3. Climate silver lining. As countries rush to secure their energy supplies, they are turning back to dirty fossil fuels. But in the medium term the war will accelerate the switch to renewables as a safer alternative to hydrocarbons supplied by autocrats. As well as wind and solar, nuclear and hydrogen will benefit too.

4. Peak China? Some time in April China’s population will be overtaken by India’s, at around 1.43bn. With China’s population in decline, and its economy facing headwinds, expect much discussion of whether China has peaked. Slower growth means its economy may never overtake America’s in size.

5. Divided America. Although Republicans did worse than expected in the midterm elections, social and cultural divides on abortion, guns and other hot-button issues continue to widen after a string of contentious Supreme Court rulings. Donald Trump’s formal entry into the 2024 presidential race will pour fuel on the fire.

6. Flashpoints to watch. The intense focus on the war in Ukraine heightens the risk of conflict elsewhere. With Russia distracted, conflicts are breaking out in its backyard. China may decide that there will never be a better time to make a move on Taiwan. India-China tensions could flare in the Himalayas. And might Turkey try to nab a Greek island in the Aegean?

7. Shifting alliances. Amid geopolitical shifts, alliances are responding. nato, revitalised by the war in Ukraine, will welcome two new members. Will Saudi Arabia join the Abraham accords, an emerging bloc? Other groupings of growing importance include the Quad and aukus (two American-led clubs intended to deal with China’s rise) and i2u2—not a rock band, but a sustainability forum linking India, Israel, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

8. Revenge tourism. Take that, covid! As travellers engage in post-lockdown “revenge” tourism, traveller spending will almost regain its 2019 level of $1.4trn, but only because inflation has pushed up prices. The actual number of international tourist trips, at 1.6bn, will still be below the pre-pandemic level of 1.8bn in 2019. Business travel will remain weak as firms cut costs.

9. Metaverse reality check. Will the idea of working and playing in virtual worlds catch on beyond video games? 2023 will provide some answers as Apple launches its first headset and Meta decides whether to change its strategy as its share price languishes. Meanwhile, a less complicated and more immediately useful shift may be the rise of “passkeys” to replace passwords.

10. New year, new jargon. Never heard of a passkey? Fear not! Turn to our special section, “Understand This”, which rounds up the vital vocabulary that will be useful to know in 2023. nimbys are out and yimbys are in; cryptocurrencies are uncool and post-quantum cryptography is hot; but can you define a frozen conflict, or synfuel? We’ve got you covered.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – August 27, 2022

Are sanctions working?

Are sanctions working?

Read full edition

Previews: The Economist Magazine – August 20, 2022

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Will Donald Trump run again?

And, if he does, would Republicans pick him as their nominee?

What kind of prime minister will Britain get?

It will be a technocrat who knows what to do, or a politician who knows how to do it

World Journalism: New Internationalist – Sept ’22

September-October 2022, Issue 539

Railways can be a world unto themselves. When properly managed, this can mean it’s easier to get things done on the railways than in other parts of an economy. That should be a huge opportunity for reducing climate emissions by getting passengers off the roads and out of the skies. But unless we re-purpose rail networks to serve the interests of people – and not those of the empires and corporations which built them and run them to this day – we can’t succeed. This edition explores how we can make a start on this task.

WILL BOLSONARO’S SPENDING SPREE LEAVE ANY WINNERS?

With an election looming, Jair Bolsonaro has set an economic timebomb for Brazil, writes Leonardo Sakamoto.

Previews: The Economist Magazine – May 21, 2022

The Economist Magazine, May 21, 2022 – War is tipping a fragile world towards mass hunger. Fixing that is everyone’s business.

Sunday Morning: Stories From Zurich, London, Helsinki And Hong Kong

Monocle’s editorial director Tyler Brûlé and panellists Aleksandra Tirziu and Chandra Kurt cover the weekend’s biggest news. Plus: we check in with our friends and contributors in London, Helsinki and Hong Kong.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week The World Economic Forum are highlighting 4 top stories – millennial retirement savings, slingshot tech for satellite launches, China’s cheapest electric car, and Paris noise sensors

Timeline: 00:15 Millennial retirement savings 01:48 Slingshot satellite launches 03:46 China’s cheapest electric car 04:52 Paris installs noise sensors

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories – April 22, 2022

This week The World Economic Forum are highlighting 4 top stories – new solar panels that work at night, how Lithuania has cut Russian gas imports, first aid training in Ukraine, and how new e-chopsticks can add taste to your food.

Chapters: 00:15 Solar panels that work at night 01:45 Lithuania axes Russian gas 03:21 First aid training in Ukraine 05:46 E-Chopsticks add taste

Preview: The Economist Magazine – April 23, 2022