Tag Archives: International Politics

Political Analysis: Brazil – A Fractured Nation (FT)

Latin America’s largest nation is facing its most important election in decades as Jair Bolsonaro and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva square off amid deep political and cultural polarisation. FT Brazil bureau chief Bryan Harris travels the nation to look at the enormous economic and social challenges facing the next president. He meets wealthy farmers, truckers, evangelicals and those facing food insecurity. Read more at https://on.ft.com/3Cjrg5T

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers and with over 214 million people, Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country by area and the seventh most populous.

Previews: The Economist Magazine – October 1, 2022

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How not to run a country

Liz Truss’s new government may already be dead in the water

Hurricane Ian pummels Florida

The Sunshine State has seen 40% of America’s hurricanes and a huge population boom

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Sept 17, 2022

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Why the monarchy matters

The monarchy is an anachronism, yet it thrived under Elizabeth II. That holds lessons for her successor and for democracies elsewhere

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Sept 10, 2022

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Can Liz Truss fix Britain?

The new prime minister must eschew pantomime radicalism if she is to succeed. The sceptics have many reasons to be dubious—yet underestimating Liz Truss is a mistake her opponents have already made to their cost.

Previews: Foreign Affairs Magazine – Sept/Oct 2022

September/October 2022

Foreign Affairs at 100 – The Magazine Marks a Century

September/October 2022

The Beginning of History

Surviving the Era of Catastrophic Risk – By William MacAskill

The Dangerous Decade – A Foreign Policy for a World in Crisis By Richard Haass

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Sept 3, 2022

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American states are now Petri dishes of polarisation

Only electoral reform can make them work properly

Two states, two very different states of mind. On August 25th California banned the sale of petrol-powered cars from 2035, a move that will reshape the car industry, reduce carbon emissions and strain the state’s electricity grid. On the same day in Texas a “trigger” law banned abortion from the moment of conception, without exceptions for rape or incest. Those who perform abortions face up to 99 years in prison.

Covers: The Economist Magazine – July 23, 2022

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ESG is often well-meaning but it is deeply flawed. The industry is a mess and needs to be ruthlessly streamlined.

If you are the type of person who is loth to invest in firms that pollute the planet, mistreat workers and stuff their boards with cronies, you will no doubt be aware of one of the hottest trends in finance: environmental, social and governance (esg) investing. It is an attempt to make capitalism work better and deal with the grave threat posed by climate change. It has ballooned in recent years; the titans of investment management claim that more than a third of their assets, or $35trn in total, are monitored through one esg lens or another. It is on the lips of bosses and officials everywhere.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – July 18, 2022

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The Economist, July 18, 2022 – Europe’s winter of discontent

Even as temperatures soar Europe faces a bitter energy crisis later this year

There may be a heatwave in Europe, but winter is coming. It promises to be brutal and divisive: the energy crisis is rapidly worsening as Vladimir Putin strangles gas supplies https://econ.st/3aJz3ir

Opinion: U.S. Extremist Democrats, A European Winter & Wine Bottles

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why the Democrats need to wake up and stop pandering to their extremes, Europe’s winter of discontent (9:50), and why bottling white wine in clear glass is an error (18:09).

Preview: The Economist Magazine – June 25, 2022

How to fix the world’s energy emergency without wrecking the environment

Even as they firefight, governments must resolve the conflict between safe supply and a safe climate.

This year’s energy shock is the most serious since the Middle Eastern oil crises of 1973 and 1979. Like those calamities, it promises to inflict short-term pain and in the longer term to transform the energy industry. The pain is all but guaranteed: owing to high fuel and power prices, most countries are facing soggy growth, inflation, squeezed living standards and a savage political backlash. But the long-run consequences are far from preordained. If governments respond ineptly, they could trigger a relapse towards fossil fuels that makes it even harder to stabilise the climate. Instead they must follow a perilous path that combines security of energy supply with climate security.