Previews: New Scientist Magazine – March 19, 2022

COVER STORIES

  • FEATURES Rabbits face a fresh onslaught akin to myxomatosis – can they survive?
  • FEATURES What gravitational waves have told us about the universe so far
  • NEWS Red and purple microbes give Australia’s mysterious pink lake its hue

Previews: London Review Of Books – March 24, 2022

Architectural Awards: Diébédo Francis Kéré Wins The 2022 Pritzker Prize

Art History: ‘Poussin And The Dance’ (The Getty)

“One of the hopes of this exhibition was really to try to enlist visitors’ bodily experience in their understanding of these works of art that can sometimes seem a little bit like they live entirely in our heads, a little bit intellectualized.”

Although Nicolas Poussin is widely regarded as the most influential painter of the 17th century—the father of French classicism—he is not as well-known as many of his contemporaries, such as Rembrandt, Rubens, and Caravaggio. This is due, in part, to Poussin’s austere painting style and erudite subject matter, which often came from Roman history or the Bible. As a result, his work can sometimes feel a bit cold or remote to today’s audiences.

But earlier in his career, Poussin was inspired by dance. His paintings of wild revelry, filled with dancing satyrs and nymphs, emerged as his signature genre from that time. Poussin and the Dance, organized by the Getty Museum and the National Gallery in London, is the first exhibition to explore the theme of dance in Poussin’s work. By supplementing his delightful dancing pictures with new dance films by Los Angeles–based choreographers—this unique exhibition invites viewers into the world of Poussin in a fresh, relatable way.

In this episode, Emily Beeny, curator in charge of European paintings at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and curator of Poussin and the Dance, joins Sarah Cooper, public programs specialist at the Getty, to delve into Poussin’s process and love of dance.

The exhibition, which received generous support from the Leonetti/O’Connell Family Foundation and is sponsored by City National Bank, is on view at the Getty Center through May 8, 2022.

Preview: Times Literary Supplement – March 18

Africa Views: A Look At The Health System In Nigeria

Nigeria is rightly taking its place on the world stage. But its health has been neglected. Prof Iruka Okeke and Dr Ṣẹ̀yẹ Abímbọ́lá lay out a positive, achievable vision for a healthy future. Read the Lancet Nigeria Commission: investing in health and the future of the nation: https://www.thelancet.com/commissions…

Nigeria is projected to become one of the most populous countries in the world, and is rightly taking its place on the world stage. The Lancet Nigeria Commission tells the story of the country through a health lens, and details recommendations that will enable the country and its people to fulfil their potential, and seize the opportunity ahead. It has been led by Nigerians for Nigerians. The Commissioners call for the creation of a new social contract that redefines the relationship between citizen and state. They argue that health has, to date, been neglected by successive governments and consequently the citizens of Nigeria, and must be recentred as a vital investment in the population – one that will reap political and economic benefits. Nigeria is poised to define the future of West Africa, the African continent, and the whole world. This Commission lays out how best to realise that ambition.