Tag Archives: March 2022

Morning News: Russia Regroups, China’s Zero-Covid Policy, Fake Profiles

The Russians are pulling some troops away from Ukraine’s capital Kyiv. But what exactly does this mean? China places the city of Shanghai on lockdown due to a surge in Covid-19 infections. And Stanford researchers uncover fake LinkedIn profiles being used by the sales industry.

Science: Navigating Life, Coastal Storminess, Boa Constrictors, Old Trees

Your ability to find your way may depend on where you grew up and how coastal storminess is changing.

00:47 Your ability to find your way may depend on where you grew up

Researchers have long been trying to understand why some humans are better at navigating than others. This week, researchers show that where someone grew up plays an important role in their ability to find their way; the more winding and disorganised the layouts of your childhood were, the better navigator you’ll be later in life.
Research article: Coutrot et al.

08:57 Research Highlights

How boas can squeeze without suffocating themselves, and why being far from humans helps trees live a long life.
Research Highlight: How boa constrictors squeeze and breathe at the same time

Research Highlight: Where are Earth’s oldest trees? Far from prying eyes

11:39 How coastal storminess is changing

Coastal flooding causes billions of dollars in damage each year. Rising sea levels are known to be a key driver, but the importance of another factor, storm surges, is less clear. Typically after accounting for increasing sea level, they’re not thought to make much of an impact. However new research suggests that this may not be the case.
Research article: Calafat et al.

16:10 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a brain implant allows a person who is completely paralysed to communicate, and penguin-like bone density suggests Spinosaurus may have hunted underwater.
Science: In a first, brain implant lets man with complete paralysis spell out thoughts: ‘I love my cool son.’

National Geographic: Spinosaurus had penguin-like bones, a sign of hunting underwater

Video: A swimming dinosaur: The tail of Spinosaurus

Exhibits: ‘Woody Guthrie – People Are The Song’ At The Morgan Library, NYC

The author of more than three thousand folk songs, Woody Guthrie (1912–1967) is one of the most influential songwriters and recording artists in American history. He is an icon of the Depression era and wrote the world’s most famous protest song, “This Land Is Your Land.”

But he was not only a songwriter, and his subject matter extended well beyond labor politics. The full corpus of his creativity—including lyrics, poetry, artwork, and largely unpublished prose writings—encompassed topics such as the environment, love, sex, spirituality, family, and racial justice. Guthrie created a personal philosophy that has impacted generations of Americans and inspired musician-activists from Pete Seeger and Bruce Springsteen to Ani DiFranco and Chuck D. As Bob Dylan noted of Guthrie, “You could listen to his songs and actually learn how to live.”

Morning News: Russia-Ukraine Talks, Israel-Arab Summit, Solomon Islands

We give you the latest on the negotiations between Russia and Ukraine. Plus: Antony Blinken’s role in the Israel-Arab summit, China’s growing influence in the Solomon Islands and a wave of Taliban reforms in Afghanistan.

Morning News: Ukraine’s Borders, Regime Change In Russia, Social Media

Ukraine insists on territorial integrity as talks loom, President Biden says he is not calling for regime change in Russia, and single dad receives kidney donation from total stranger who replied on social media.