Tag Archives: Buildings

Architecture: ‘Louis Sullivan – Invention Of The Skyscraper’ In 1897

Louis Sullivan, Bayard-Condict Building, 1897–99 (65 Bleecker Street, NYC), a Seeing America video speakers: Dr. Matthew A. Postal and Dr. Steven Zucker.

Louis Henry Sullivan was an Irish-American architect, and has been called a “father of skyscrapers” and “father of modernism”. He was an influential architect of the Chicago School, a mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright, and an inspiration to the Chicago group of architects who have come to be known as the Prairie School.

The Bayard–Condict Building at 65 Bleecker Street between Broadway and Lafayette Street, at the head of Crosby Street in the NoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is the only work of architect Louis Sullivan in New York City.

Skylines & Architecture: ‘Toronto, Canada’ (4K UHD)

Toronto, the capital of the province of Ontario, is a major Canadian city along Lake Ontario’s northwestern shore. It’s a dynamic metropolis with a core of soaring skyscrapers, all dwarfed by the iconic, free-standing CN Tower. Toronto also has many green spaces, from the orderly oval of Queen’s Park to 400-acre High Park and its trails, sports facilities and zoo. 

Design: 20 Ft. Wide ‘Pencil Tower Hotel’ In Sydney

An improbably narrow, six meter wide site is envisaged for a 100m tower in the downtown area of Sydney near its central station. 

Our proposal embraces this extraordinary attenuated quality, proposing a ‘column’ tower on a low scale podium. 

The podium references the delicacy and detail of its heritage neighbours, using the language of grand arching brickwork. A three story urban room houses multiple levels of lobby, cafe & lounge, visible through a large scale keyhole window. A walled courtyard garden for shared use overlooks the street. 

The tower simulates the compression and extension of a column, through a continuous abstraction of the elements of a column: base, shaft and capital.
 

The facade begins with compressed horizontal screening, slowly transforming into exaggerated verticals at the top. Horizontals begin wide and flush with the outside frame, slowly thinning and receding at the height of the tower. Each horizontal is at the height of the slab, handrail and door head height. 

The capital is joyfully expressed as a flying balcony and shell curves of a rooftop sundeck, pool and “hammam” spa. The soffit of the curved ceiling  is brightly tiled, visible from both the street below and the city beyond.
 
Each floor houses compact hotel rooms, gathering light from the street, rear court or internal shapely voids. The voids are tiled to reflect light and colour into the rooms. Key hole windows provide a framed vignette of the seamless tiled surface.

Testing the boundaries of construction and design, the ‘pencil’ tower adds both a generous street room and  a heroic skyline to its neighbourhood.

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Buildings: ’98 Front’ In Brooklyn, New York By ODA Architects (Video)

Architecture firm ODA has completed a luxury residential building in Brooklyn that features Jenga-style facades made of concrete and glass.

Called 98 Front, the condominium building occupies a corner lot in Dumbo, a waterfront neighbourhood that has seen a flurry of new development in recent decades. The building is a short walk from Brooklyn Bridge Park, which stretches along the East River.

Designed by New York-based ODA, the project is intended to combine “sophisticated, innovative architecture with superior craftsmanship”. Roughly rectangle in plan, the building rises 10 levels and totals 189,000 square feet (17,559 square metres), Made of concrete and glass, the building’s exterior consists of irregularly placed cubic volumes that recall a game of Jenga. The projecting blocks create numerous overhangs and terraces.

Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1608959

Skyline Views: Frankfurt, Germany In Hyperlapse

Frankfurt, a central German city on the river Main, is a major financial hub that’s home to the European Central Bank. It’s the birthplace of famed writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose former home is now the Goethe House Museum. Like much of the city, it was damaged during World War II and later rebuilt. The reconstructed Altstadt (Old Town) is the site of Römerberg, a square that hosts an annual Christmas market.

SKYLINE VIEWS is a fast motion short film by German filmmakers Fenchel & Janisch. The hyper lapse and time lapse footage was shot in summer 2020 in Frankfurt using mirrorless cameras. The static scenes were locked-off tripod shots and the motion shots were photographed hand-held. The high resolution photo sequences were edited using Adobe CameraRaw and After Effects CC.

Green Renovation: ‘1970 Manchester, UK Building’ By TP Bennett Architects

This video produced by Dezeen for TP Bennett reveals how the architecture practice has transformed an old building in Manchester into an “ultra sustainable” mixed-use office building.

Called Windmill Green, the office building is a conversion of an unused 1970s structure in the heart of the city that was due to be demolished. The site has been transformed into a mixed-use co-working space fitted with several sustainable additions geared towards carbon reduction and biodiversity, such as solar panels, beehives, and “Manchester’s largest living wall”.

“Sustainability was a key driver with this scheme and we transferred a derelict and vacant building into an ultra sustainable and high-spec workplace” said Yvette Hanson, the principal director of TP Bennett, in the video. “At TP Bennett, we bring a deep commitment to carbon reduction to deliver buildings that better reflect the way people live, work and interact, while at the same time fostering a positive social impact,” she added.

Developed in collaboration with real estate investment boutique FORE Partnership, the building features a ground level dedicated to retail and a facade covered with the green terracotta tiles that are typical of buildings in Manchester.

Skyline Views: ‘Honolulu’ – Oahu, Hawaii (4K Video)

Honolulu, the capital of Hawaii, is a U.S. city that currently contains over 470 high-rises. In 2011 it ranked fourth among U.S. cities in the number of high rise buildings, after New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles, and just ahead of San Francisco.[1] In 2017, it ranked sixth, having fallen behind Houston and Washington, D.C.[2]

The first high rise that exceeded 350 ft was the Ala Moana Hotel built in 1970. The next high rise was the Yacht Harbor Towers followed by the Hawaii Monarch Hotel and the Discovery Bay Center. This was the beginning of the construction boom in the city. At the same time business and finance also boomed. During the 1990s new Residentials were built, including the One Waterfront Mauka Tower, Imperial Plaza, Nauru Tower and the Hawaiki Tower. There is still construction today on high rises such as the Moana Pacific East Tower and Moana Pacific West Tower twin towers, Keola Lai, Hokua at 1288 Ala Moana, Pacifica Honolulu, and The Watermark Waikiki.