Tag Archives: Buildings

Cover: The Architectural Review – December 2022

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The Architectural Review December 2022 issue: Whether it’s a house, a room or a collection of objects, homes are the imprint of the people who inhabit them. Described as the ‘detritus of life’ by Sam Johnson-Schlee in this issue’s keynote, the remnants of our daily lives can say much about who we are, while the possessions we choose to display around us say more about how we want to be seen.

Charles Jencks and Maggie Keswick | Anupama Kundoo | Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky | João Batista Vilanova Artigas | Laurie Simmons | Kochi Architects Studio | Ekar Architects | Atelier Tho.A | Chat Architects | Fernanda Canales Arquitectura | Brillhart Architecture

Very few people have the resources to realise the house of their dreams, yet the results can be extraordinary. From the London home of Charles Jencks and Maggie Keswick, which is a manifestation of their postmodern fantasies, to the local materials and construction techniques of Anupama Kundoo’s Wall House in Auroville, this issue revisits houses designed by architects for themselves, and sometimes their families. Also celebrated are the winning projects of the 2022 AR House Awards, featuring innovative and intriguing dwellings from Mexico, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam and the Bahamas.

Los Angeles Architecture: Inside The Broad Museum

Dezeen – Architect Elizabeth Diller explains how The Broad Museum in Los Angeles was designed to feel “extremely welcoming” in the next instalment of Dezeen’s Concrete Icons series produced in collaboration with Holcim.

The video features The Broad in Los Angeles designed by Diller’s studio Diller Scofidio + Renfro, a three-storey museum that houses an expansive collection of contemporary and post-war artworks. Speaking to Dezeen in an exclusive video interview filmed at the Diller, Scofidio + Renfro office in New York City, Diller explained how the building was designed to feel inviting to visitors with a porous facade that allows light to be gently diffused into the gallery.

“It doesn’t really feel like a traditional museum,” Diller said. “There’s no sense of authority. When you step off the street, no one tells you where to go. There’s no information desk, there’s no admissions desk. You don’t pay, it’s free. It feels extremely welcoming.”

Views: Architecture Today Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

AT September-October 2022 Front Cover

Architecture Today – November-December 2022:

View the digital edition

Isabel Allen’s Editorial for AT322 discusses how the Architecture Today Awards subverted the traditional role of the crit, transforming it into powerful tool for judging the merits and performance of buildings that already exist.

Buildings.

A sharp, trapezoidal marquee hoisted on spindly pilot is points the way towards the primary pedestrian entrance on the long eastern front.

Florida Design: Building The Salvador Dali Museum

The challenges of redesigning the Dali museum in Florida were two-fold: deliver an iconic design befitting of its subject, and defy conventional building methods to make it strong enough to withstand a hurricane. The result: a landmark structure, as enduring as the work of the great artist himself.

The original Dalí Museum opened in St. Petersburg in 1982, after community leaders rallied to bring the Morses’ superlative collection of Dalí works to the area. The Dalí’s stunning new building opened on January 11, 2011. Designed by architect Yann Weymouth of HOK, it combines the rational with the fantastical: a simple rectangle with 18-inch thick hurricane-proof walls out of which erupts a large free-form geodesic glass bubble known as the “enigma”.

The Enigma, which is made up of 1,062 triangular pieces of glass, stands 75 feet at its tallest point, a twenty-first century homage to the dome that adorns Dalí’s museum in Spain. Inside, the Museum houses another unique architectural feature – a helical staircase – recalling Dalí’s obsession with spirals and the double helical shape of the DNA molecule.

The Future Of Cities: CO2 Absorbing & Repurposed

Will the cities of the future be climate neutral? Might they also be able to actively filter carbon dioxide out of the air? Futurologist Vincente Guallarte thinks so. In fact, he says, our cities will soon be able to absorb CO2, just like trees do.

To accomplish this, Guallarte wants to bring sustainable industries and agriculture to our urban centers, with greenhouses atop every building. But in order for Guallarte’s proposal to work, he says, cities will have learn to submit to the laws and principles of nature. Urban planners also have big plans for our energy supply. In the future, countries like Germany could become energy producers.

In Esslingen am Neckar, residents are working on producing green hydrogen in homes, to be used as fuel for trucks. It’s a project that‘s breaking new ground, says investor Manfred Norbert. Our future cities will be all about redefining a new normal. Architects and urban planners are expecting to see entirely new approaches to communal living, as well as new urban concepts for autonomous supply chains. The repurposing of old buildings, and the generation of food as well as energy, are other important topics.

The architect Arno Brandhuber thinks the current building stock available, and the possibilities it offers, have been underestimated. His spectacular business headquarters are located in an old silo in Berlin’s Lichtenberg district. His most provocative project, something he calls his “Anti-villa,” is a repurposed East German factory for cotton knitwear. It‘s a prime example of sustainable design.

Tours: San Francisco’s Storied Architecture

Today on AD Architect James Dixon leads us on a walking tour of San Francisco, highlighting the captivating details found in its storied architecture. From the iconic Transamerica Pyramid and Hallidie Building to Postcard Row, the Presidio and more – discover the history behind San Francisco’s most famous buildings and neighborhoods through James Dixon’s expert eye.

Cities: The Skyscraper Boom In Miami, Florida

Miami’s skyscraper boom is happening on the frontlines of the climate crisis.

Miami, city, seat (1844) of Miami-Dade county, southeastern Florida, U.S. A major transportation and business hub, Miami is a leading resort and Atlantic Ocean port situated on Biscayne Bay at the mouth of the Miami River. The Everglades area is a short distance to the west. Greater Miami, the state’s largest urban concentration, comprises all of the county, which includes the cities of Miami Beach (across the bay), Coral GablesHialeah, North Miami, and many smaller municipalities and unincorporated areas; together, these make up the southern section of Florida’s “Gold Coast.” 

Cover: The Architectural Review – October 2022

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AR October 2022 – The Energy Issue

In the beginning, there was energy. Everything since then, has been an exercise in transforming energy from one state into another – food becomes labour, gas becomes electricity, fossil fuels become architecture.

In this month’s keynote essay, Barnabas Calder writes: ‘In the millennia before fossil fuels, the circular economy was the only economically viable way to operate’. Recognising that architecture is formed from the fuel we extract to create and sustain it could be a transformative way of thinking about our built environment.

This issue seeks to make visible the often obscured links between buildings and the energy sources they are built from, and around.

Cover: The Architectural Review – September 2022

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AR September 2022

As students all over the world head back to school this month, this issue maps the different sites for learning – both inside and outside academic institutions. From rainforests to classrooms to disused water basins, spaces for education come in all different forms, but face similar challenges and are subjected to the same damaging forces: of marketisation, racism and colonialism, and asymmetries of power. Architecture schools are no exception, as this issue lays bare.

Wolff Architects | Alison Brooks Architects | Feilden Fowles| Níall McLaughlin Architects | Wright & Wright | Henley Halebrown | Comunal | Raumlabor | Joar Nango | bell hooks

Design: The Architecture Of Baseball Stadiums (AD)

Hey, batter batter! Michael Wyetzner of Michielli + Wyetzner Architects returns to AD, this time breaking down the architectural details found in baseball stadiums around North America. From some of the earliest homes of the national pastime to current multi-billion dollar behemoths, Michael offers up expert insight on what makes each of them distinct.