Architecture: Iconic Hotels Of Istanbul

Istanbul has no shortage of spectacular hotels, from former sultans’ palaces to intimate boutique properties. The crème de la crème is the Çırağan Palace Kempinski, the oldest remaining part of which was built as Sultan Abdülaziz’s palace in 1871. 

By Laura Itzkowitz June 8, 2021

Napoleon Bonaparte once said, “If the earth were a single state, Istanbul would be its capital.” Spend a week there and you’ll begin to understand why. This massive metropolis of 15 million people quite literally bridges Europe and Asia. It has witnessed the rise and fall of empires, from the Roman Empire to the Byzantine Empire to the Ottoman Empire, each of which has left its trace on the city. For this reason, Istanbul is a playground for design lovers, who can gaze upon incredible palaces and mosques, shop for ceramics and textiles in the Grand Bazaar, drink and dine in stylish restaurants and bars, and sleep in some of the world’s most luxurious hotels.

Read and see more at Architectural Digest

English Country Homes: Sortridge Manor In Dartmoor National Park

Over in West Devon, the village of Horrabridge in the Dartmoor National Park, four miles south of Tavistock, grew up around an ancient crossing over the fast-flowing River Walkham, a famous salmon river, its 15th-century bridge one of the oldest in Devon.

In the late 1800s/early 1900s, the south wing of the original Elizabethan building was rebuilt after ‘three successive fires’ destroyed ‘the hall and one wing’.

In the late 1800s, three sisters sold the 400-acre Sortridge estate to a Plymouth stockbroker who immediately sold it again in lots, thereby doubling his money.

The manor and 140 acres of land were bought by Col Marwood Tucker, whose widow sold the property to George Porter Rogers in 1955. In November 1961, Mr Rogers sold the manor with three acres of grounds for £5,500 to Cmdr C. R. Smythe, who sold it in turn to Cmdr Stubley.

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Aerial Views: The Many Landscapes Of Iceland

Iceland, a Nordic island nation, is defined by its dramatic landscape with volcanoes, geysers, hot springs and lava fields. Massive glaciers are protected in Vatnajökull and Snæfellsjökull national parks. Most of the population lives in the capital, Reykjavik, which runs on geothermal power and is home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history.

Technology: Quantum Computers, Explained

Quantum computers aren’t the next generation of supercomputers—they’re something else entirely. Before we can even begin to talk about their potential applications, we need to understand the fundamental physics that drives the theory of quantum computing. (Featuring Scott Aaronson, John Preskill, and Dorit Aharonov.) For more, read “Why Quantum Computers Are So Hard to Explain”: https://www.quantamagazine.org/why-is…

Views: Woolworth Tower Pinnacle Penthouse (4K)

“The Pinnacle Penthouse, developed by Alchemy Properties, is New York’s preeminent residential offering. Reaching 727 feet high, this five-story home encompasses 9,680 square feet of interior space and a private 408 square foot observatory terrace. Exquisite highlights include 125 windows, 24-foot ceilings and an in-residence private elevator. Delivered in architect ready condition, this offering has sparked the imagination and design talents of two of the most noted architects of our time,

Thierry W Despont and David Hotson. Despont is the world’s foremost designer of extraordinary restorations, opulent private estates, and legendary hotels. His vision for the Pinnacle embodies grand areas for entertaining along with ornate touches that make this penthouse unlike any other prized property in the world. There is an alternate design, which includes the acquisition of an additional floor, provided by David Hotson who is well known for his expertise in voluminous, residential spaces. His remarkable work at The Skyhouse Penthouse, at 150 Nassau Street, was awarded “Best Apartment of the Decade” by Interior Design Magazine in 2015. The acquisition and completion of what has been called, “One of the last great unclaimed spaces in New York City” is now available to be celebrated and transformed into an architectural masterpiece which can never be replicated!” https://thewoolworthtower.com/

News: Top 5 Stories For June 8, 2021 (Reuters)

Five stories to know for June 8: Colonial Pipeline, Guatemala, shooting of 6-year-old, truck attack and hi-tech sting

1. The Justice Department recovered some $2.3 million in cryptocurrency ransom paid by Colonial Pipeline, cracking down on hackers who launched the most disruptive U.S. cyberattack on record.

2. U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris said she had “robust” talks with Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei on the need to fight corruption to help deter undocumented immigration from Central America to the United States.

3. Authorities in California said they had arrested two people expected to be charged with murder over the death of 6-year-old Aiden Leos, whose shooting in a suspected road rage incident on the way to school had caused an outpouring of public grief.

4. A man accused of killing four members of a Canadian Muslim family by running them over in his pickup truck targeted them in an attack motivated by hate, police said.

5. Global law enforcement agencies hacked into an app used by criminals and read millions of encrypted messages, leading to hundreds of arrests of organized crime figures in 18 countries, officials said.

Walking Tour: Rosenheim – Bavaria, Germany (4K)

Rosenheim is a city in Bavaria, southeastern Germany. Its Lokschuppen Rosenheim arts center hosts exhibits in a converted 19th-century railway depot. Max-Josefs-Platz, the market square, is surrounded by arcades, cafes and centuries-old townhouses. The Municipal Museum has displays of local history, including Roman relics. To the east, Simssee is a lake with trails in the foothills of the Bavarian Alps. 

Los Angeles: Petersen Automotive Museum (4K)

The Petersen Automotive Museum is located on Wilshire Boulevard along Museum Row in the Miracle Mile neighborhood of Los Angeles. One of the world’s largest automotive museums, the Petersen Automotive Museum is a nonprofit organization specializing in automobile history and related educational programs.

Founded on June 11, 1994, by magazine publisher Robert E. Petersen and his wife Margie, the $40-million Petersen Automotive Museum is owned and operated by the Petersen Automotive Museum Foundation. The museum was originally located within the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, and later moved to a historic department store designed by Welton Becket.

Opened in 1962, the building first served as a short-lived U.S. branch of Seibu Department Stores, before operating as an Ohrbach’s department store from 1965 to 1986. Six years after Ohrbach’s closed, Robert Petersen selected the largely windowless site as an ideal space for a museum—allowing artifacts to be displayed without harmful exposure to direct sunlight. In 2015, the museum underwent an extensive $125 million renovation.The building’s façade was redesigned by the architectural firm Kohn Pedersen Fox, and features a stainless-steel ribbon assembly made of 100 tons of 14-gauge type 304 steel in 308 sections, 25 supports and 140,000 custom stainless-steel screws.Designers at The Scenic Route configured interior spaces to accommodate changing exhibits.[4] The remodeled museum opened to the public on December 7, 2015.

Morning News: Criminal Justice Reform, Mali Coup, Japanese Anime Popularity

Piecemeal criminal-justice reforms following last year’s protests are coming up against hard numbers: violent crime is up. We ask what can, and should, be done. 

The man who led a coup in Mali last year has done it again; our correspondent considers how the tumult affects the wider, regional fight against jihadism. And the global spread of Japan’s beloved anime.