Tag Archives: Rainforests

Travel Tour: Top 10 Mayan Ruins In Central America

For almost a millennium, the ancient ruins of great architecture lay buried beneath the jungle vegetation on the Yucatan Peninsula. Abandoned by their creators these ancient temples and pyramids are a stunning reminder of a powerful civilization that once ruled the people of Central America. Although the accomplishments of the ancient Mayans are astonishing, no city would escape the inevitable collapse. One by one they were swallowed by the rainforest leaving the amazing Mayan ruins hidden, waiting to be discovered.

The Maya civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its logosyllabic script—the most sophisticated and highly developed writing system in pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system.

Aerial Views: Costa Rica

Costa Rica is a rugged, rainforested Central American country with coastlines on the Caribbean and Pacific. Though its capital, San Jose, is home to cultural institutions like the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum, Costa Rica is known for its beaches, volcanoes, and biodiversity. Roughly a quarter of its area is made up of protected jungle, teeming with wildlife including spider monkeys and quetzal birds. 

8K Views: Colors Of The World’s Rainforests

In this video you can see rainforest butterflies, lizards, blue jeans poison dart frog, treefrogs, glass frogs, squirrel monkey, capuchin monkey, red colobus monkey, silvery gibbon, peccary, lemur, chameleon, jaguar, three toed sloth and beautiful colored birds as jacobin, toucan, maccaw, parrot, hummingbirds, tanager, motmot, quetzal, from different rainforest areas as Caribbean, Costa Rica, Brazil, Madagagascar.

Views: Rainforests And Wildlife In Costa Rica

Costa Rica is a rugged, rainforested Central American country with coastlines on the Caribbean and Pacific. Though its capital, San Jose, is home to cultural institutions like the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum, Costa Rica is known for its beaches, volcanoes, and biodiversity. Roughly a quarter of its area is made up of protected jungle, teeming with wildlife including spider monkeys and quetzal birds. 

Climate: Rainforests In Some Unexpected Places

Many of us are familiar with rainforests; lush and exotic environments that serve as the pinnacle of life on Earth. For the most part we assume these only occur throughout the tropics, but as it turns out certain areas in the temperate latitudes can receive just as much rainfall, creating a number of rainforests in unexpected places.

Temperate rainforests are coniferous or broadleaf forests that occur in the temperate zone and receive heavy rain. … The moist conditions of temperate rain forests generally support an understory of mosses, ferns and some shrubs and berries.

Wildlife: ‘Leaping’ Lemurs In Madagascar (HD Video)

As one of the largest species of Lemur, the Diademed Sifaka is an endangered species that is endemic to Madagascan rainforests. With their long legs and short arms, they are marvellous at leaping through the trees of the rainforest, with each leap being as long as 10m. However, take this adapt leaper out of the trees and onto the forest floor, and things become a bit more bouncy!

Madagascar, officially the Republic of Madagascar, and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, approximately 400 kilometres off the coast of East Africa across the Mozambique Channel. At 592,800 square kilometres Madagascar is the world’s second-largest island country.

Rainforest Views: ‘Hotel Das Cataratas’ At Iguassu Falls In Brazil (HD Video)

Restored to its original 1950s charm, Hotel Das Cataratas hacienda-style exterior is matched by its warm, inviting interior design. Step outside and explore the sprawling, sculpted grounds. Spot a kaleidoscopic array of tropical flowers as howler monkeys call in the distance. Nestled in the center is an elegantly designed pool. Flanked by orchids, it’s the perfect spot for a refreshing dip after a day full of adventure.

Iguazú National Park covers an area of subtropical rainforest in Argentina’s Misiones province, on the border with Brazil. Within the park on the Iguazú River, the renowned Iguazú Falls encompasses many separate cascades, including the iconic Garganta del Diablo or “Devil’s Throat.” The surrounding park features diverse wildlife including coatis, jaguars and toucans, plus trails and viewing platforms. 

Ecosystems: ‘Scotland’s Rainforest’ (HD Video)

Scotland’s rainforest is one of our most precious habitats. It is as important as tropical rainforest, but even rarer. Yet few people know it exists and fewer still know how globally significant it is. This film was created by the Alliance for Scotland’s Rainforest to inform and inspire better protection for Scotland’s rainforest.

Scotland’s rainforest is made up of the native woodlands found on Scotland’s west coast where consistent levels of rainfall and relatively mild, year-round temperatures provide just the right conditions for some of the world’s rarest mosses, liverworts and lichens.

Deforestation: ‘Amazon Rainforest’ – Becoming A Savannah In 15 Yrs? (Video)

New research suggests that if the current rate of deforestation continues, the Amazon rainforest could transform into a savannah within 15 years. Do we have time to stop it?

The Amazon basin spans over 6 million square kilometers, and is home to one-fifth of the world’s land species. In addition, it supports the 30 million people who live and depend on the land as a source of food, medicine, and shelter. That’s not even including the key role it plays in regulating the regional AND global climate.

Trees absorb water through their roots and transport it to their leaves, where it’s released as vapor through small pores in a process called transpiration. As the water vapor rises and condenses, it forms rain clouds over the forest canopy. Basically, the rainforest is making its own weather. For example, one large tree can release 1,000 liters of water into the atmosphere in a single day.

The rainforest recycles this water up to six times before it moves out of the region, but as more trees are cut down, those that remain may not be able to recycle enough water to survive. Less trees means more sunlight will hit the forest floor, exposing the forest to higher temperatures. Since deforestation began accelerating in the 1970’s, 800,000 square kilometers of the Amazon have been lost. And over that same period, the average temperature of the basin has risen by 1 degree Celsius.