Tag Archives: Healthcare

Medical Procedures: How “Gamma Knife” Surgery Treats Brain Tumors

It’s called gamma knife surgery, but there’s no cutting involved. It’s been used at Mayo Clinic for 30 years as an alternative to open brain surgery.

The patient’s head is held still during the procedure with a headframe, which also serves as a map for the radiation. Using 3D imaging — typically an MRI — as a guide, the gamma knife is targeted directly at the tumor. And with no hospital stay and minimal side effects, it’s a procedure that is efficient and can be lifesaving.

Digital Medicine: Apps For Smartphones, Machine Learning To Treat Kidney Disease (The Lancet)

From a The Lancet online article (January 18, 2020):

The Lancet logoSmartphone app-based platforms for urine testing could improve adherence to albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) testing. One study showed screening of at-risk patients almost doubled with a home urine test kit that uses a smartphone camera to easily and accurately quantify ACR from a user-performed urine dipstick. If independently validated in a large, diverse population, this low-cost strategy could change the often dim trajectory for individuals with declining kidney function. Chronic Kidney Disease A Global Crisis Siemens Healthineers

In the outpatient setting, a Japanese team used machine learning and natural language processing to predict disease progression and need for dialysis over 6 months in patients with diabetic nephropathy. And while the increased risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury has been long appreciated, a machine learning algorithm trained and tested on 3 million adults effectively quantified the degree of kidney injury on the basis of the volume of contrast used and individual patient-level characteristics.

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Senior Healthcare: The Challenges Of Safely “Aging In Place” (Video)

The 65-and-older population is the fastest-growing age group in the world. In this video, Stony Brook experts discuss the challenges facing this burgeoning population and their caregivers, and the technology that can facilitate happy, healthy and safe aging.

Innovation In Aging: “Creating an Age-Friendly Public Health System”

From an Innovation In Aging online release:

Age-Friendly Social MovementBecoming an Age-Friendly Health System entails reliably acting on a set of four evidence-based elements of high-quality care and services, known as the “4Ms,” for all older adults. When implemented together, the 4Ms represent a broad shift to focus on the needs of older adults:

  • (1) What Matters: Know and align care with each older adult’s specific health outcome goals and care preferences including, but not limited to, end-of-life care and across settings of care;
  • (2) Medication: If medication is necessary, use Age-Friendly medication that does not interfere with What Matters to the older adult, Mobility, or Mentation across settings of care;
  • (3) Mentation: Prevent, identify, treat, and manage dementia, depression, and delirium across settings of care; and
  • (4) Mobility: Ensure that older adults move safely every day to maintain function and do What Matters

The Age-Friendly Health Systems movement, initiated in 2017, recognizes that an all-in, national response is needed to embrace the health and well-being of the growing older adult population. Like public health, health systems, including payers, hospitals, clinics, community-based organizations, nursing homes, and home health care, need to adopt a new way of thinking that replaces unwanted care and services with aligned interventions that respect older adults’ goals and preferences. Becoming an Age-Friendly Health System entails reliably acting on a set of four evidence-based elements of high-quality care and services, known as the “4Ms,” for all older adults.

The number of Americans Ages 65 and Older will more than Double by 2060 graphic from Census Bureau

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Medical Technology: “Digital Health Trends” At CES 2020 Show (Podcast)

January 8, 2020 – Digital health is one of the hottest and fastest-growing tech categories, not just at CES but throughout the entire tech industry. Join us for a roundtable with media experts discussing health innovations at CES 2020, the growth potential for the health care market and more.

Guests Amy Roberts, Managing Editor, Reviewed Dana Wollman, Editor-In-Chief, Engadget Neil Batra, Principal—Life Sciences & Health Care Strategy, Deloitte

Physician Profiles: Best-Selling Author Abraham Verghese MD (JAMA Video)

My Own Country A Doctor's Storey Abraham Verghese MD bookIn this video, best-selling author Abraham Verghese, MD, discusses the origins of the study he coauthored identifying 5 practices that foster meaningful connections between physicians and patients.

 

Health: “Multimorbidity” Is Rising, Creating Greater Demand For “Cluster Medicine” Expertise (BMJ)

From a The BMJ online editorial:

Multimorbidity THE BMJThe proportion of patients who have two or more medical conditions simultaneously is, however, rising steadily. This is currently termed multimorbidity, although patient groups prefer the more intuitive “multiple health conditions.” In high income countries, multimorbidity is mainly driven by age, and the proportion of the population living with two or more diseases is steadily increasing because of demographic change. This trend will continue.

Cluster medicine

The cluster around diabetes is a good example, with the common serious disease affecting the heart, nervous system, skin, peripheral vasculature, and eyes. Diabetologists already provide care for the cluster of multiorgan diseases around diabetes, and some specialties, such as geriatrics or general practice, have multimorbidity at their heart. For most, however, training and service organisation are not optimised to face a multimorbidity dominated future.

The shift includes moving from thinking about multimorbidity as a random assortment of individual conditions to recognising it as a series of largely predictable clusters of disease in the same person. Some of these clusters will occur by chance alone because individuals are affected by a variety of commonly occurring diseases. Many, however, will be non-random because of common genetic, behavioural, or environmental pathways to disease. Identifying these clusters is a priority and will help us to be more systematic in our approach to multimorbidity.

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