Tag Archives: Northern California

Condo With A View: ‘Nob Hill, San Francisco’ (Video)

Commandingly sited on the northeast corner of one of the highest floors within Nob Hill’s premier hi-rise, this spectacularly renovated 2,780 sq. ft. residence delivers panoramic, sweeping views of San Francisco. Iconic views span the serene North Bay to the dynamic Downtown skyline.

Exquisitely crafted under the leadership of renowned architect Andrew Skurman, this rare condominium serves as a comfortable home with luxurious modern amenities that scales to ignite generous entertaining. A private elevator landing opens to a foyer with large walls and an alcove for art. Accented by a stone-clad fireplace in a contemporary silhouette and beauti­­­fully ­­­upholstered walls, the oversized living & dining room features in-laid hardwood floors handcrafted in Italy. Oversized windows and a balcony showcase remarkable views of San Francisco, brilliant by day and vibrantly illuminated by night.

1170 Sacramento, known as The Nob Hill, overlooks the beautiful Huntington Park on San Francisco’s Nob Hill amidst the famous Fairmont, Huntington & Mark Hopkins Hotels, the majestic Grace Cathedral and the stately Pacific Union Club.

Profile: Pitmaster Matt Horn Perfects ‘West Coast-Style BBQ’ (Video)

Horn Barbecue pitmaster Matt Horn fell in love with barbecue from a young age, when he learned to get a feel for how to make juicy, tender, and smoky brisket, ribs, and other meats from his grandfather’s smoker without even using a thermometer. Now, he cultivates his “West Coast-style” barbecue, inspired by a combination of Central Texas barbecue, traditions from the deep south, and Horn’s Bay Area roots, at his restaurant in Oakland.

Aerial Views: ‘Sacramento – California’ (4K Video)

Sacramento, capital of the U.S. state of California, lies at the confluence of the Sacramento River and American River. The district of Old Sacramento harkens back to the city’s Gold Rush era, with wooden sidewalks and wagon rides. One of several museums in Old Sacramento, the California State Railroad Museum depicts the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad, one of the country’s earliest technological feats.

Home Tours: Classic San Francisco Near Golden Gate Bridge (HD Video)

A rare offering. French-style façade with outstanding curb appeal. Exquisite 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home perfectly situated on a flat block in prime Cow Hollow. Extra-large lot (Approx. 32.5 sq. ft. by 137 sq. ft.) with glorious terraced backyard and mature trees for ultimate seclusion. Enjoy indoor and outdoor living and garden views on every level with kitchen patio and upper story slate decks. Dramatic grand foyer with elegantly curved staircase and wrought iron balustrade. Expansive living/dining room with French doors opening to fresh-air balconies overlook the picturesque, tree-lined street. On the south garden side, the stunning, gourmet kitchen/great room showcases beautiful Calacatta d’Oro marble counters. A family room beside the kitchen, top-floor family room/gym and wet bar, and a cozy sitting area with fireplace in the major bedroom offer options for gathering and relaxing. The sublime major suite features a fireplace, window seat, and a luxurious, spa-style bath. 2-car side by side garage with interior access.

Architectural Tours: San Francisco Contemporary Atop Mount Sutro (Video)

Commanding panoramic views from an advantageous point on Mount Sutro, 150 Glenbrook Avenue holds the iconic and singular position of San Francisco’s highest residence above sea level.

Atop one of the city’s famed seven hills can be found an alchemy of site and design from the groundbreaking studio of John Maniscalco Architecture. A gently sloping, corner lot with panoramic views from the Salesforce Tower crowned skyline to the distant hills of the East Bay and Marin Headlands. Major visual landmarks include Alcatraz Island, Golden Gate Bridge, and San Francisco City Hall.

An interplay of hand selected materials and ever-changing natural light creates an enchanting series of visual moments throughout the day and into the evening twilight.

Signaling the work of a creative master and a confident step forward in the historic lineage of Bay Area modernist architects, 150 Glenbrook captures a moment in time of contemporary San Francisco architectural design. 150 Glenbrook presents a rare opportunity to join a select group of homeowners who, through their passion for design and craft, are creating a historic architectural moment to be valued for decades to come. visual focal point in the main living room. Each room is a wonderful discovery of its own and a singular experience of light, texture, and passion.

Timelapse Travel: ‘Santa Cruz Mountains’ In Northern California

Filmed and Edited by: Della Huff

In July 2020 we moved to our new home in the Santa Cruz Mountains. We’re lucky to have an extraordinary view to the west, and I find so much inspiration in the changing weather and light that the view affords. I have especially cherished it this year since we have been spending nearly all of our time at home. I created this timelapse reel to capture the beauty and dynamism of the Santa Cruz Mountains, but I also felt that timelapse was an apt medium for capturing this time-bendingly strange year. I hope you enjoy it.

The Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are a mountain range in central and northern California, United States. They form a ridge down the San Francisco Peninsula, south of San Francisco. 

Views: The ‘Golden Gate Bridge’ In San Francisco, California (Video)

The Golden Gate Bridge stands at the entrance to California’s San Francisco Bay as a symbol of American ingenuity and resolve, having been constructed during the era of the Great Depression. Today, this beloved international icon and true engineering marvel carries about 40 million vehicles a year and serves not only as a vital transportation link but also as a major travel destination for millions of visitors from around the world.

Construction began on January 5, 1933. This was followed by the official ground breaking ceremony held on February 26, 1933, at nearby Crissy Field (now part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area). The start of construction was met with great delight. A celebration at nearby Crissy Field went on for hours with at least 100,000 people in attendance. The San Francisco newspaper wrote the next day, “Two hundred and fifty carrier pigeons, provided by the San Francisco Racing Pigeon Club to carry the message of groundbreaking to every corner of California, were so frightened by the surging human mass that small boys had to crawl into their compartments in the bridge replica to shoo them out with sticks.”

Construction Timeline

December 22, 1932: Extending from Fort Baker pier, the construction of a 1,700 foot-long access road began to access the construction sites for the Marin anchorage, pier and tower.

January 5, 1933: Construction officially started.

January 1933 to February 1936: Marin and San Francisco anchorages and associated pylons.

January 1933 to May 1935: San Francisco anchorage.

January 1933 to June 1933: Marin pier.

January 1933 to June 1935: Marin anchorage.

February 1933: Work began on the east approach road from San Francisco that extended through the Presidio to the south end of the Golden Gate Bridge.

March 1933: Steel for the San Francisco and Marin towers that was prefabricated in Bethlehem steel foundries in Pottstown and Steelton, PA was brought by flatcar to Philadelphia and transferred to barges and shipped through the Panama Canal to Alameda, CA where it was stored until the Marin pier was completed and ready for tower erection.

March 1933 to March 1934: San Francisco tower access trestle was constructed extending 1100 feet offshore. Just as the trestle was completed, it was significantly damaged for the first time on August 14, 1933, when the McCormick Steamship Line’s Sidney M. Hauptman plowed through the thick fog and crashed into the access trestle, damaging about 400 feet. After repairs were made, on December 13, 1933, as a southwest gale battered the Golden Gate Strait for two days, the access trestle was again battered and this time there was 800 feet of wreckage. Trestle repairs began shortly thereafter and completed March 8, 1934.

November 7, 1933: Marin tower construction started. Depending on the source referenced, it was completed either on June 28, 1934 or sometime in November 1934.

October 24, 1934: San Francisco fender wall completed.

November 27, 1934: San Francisco pier area within the fender wall was un-watered.

January 3, 1935: San Francisco pier reached its final height of 44 feet above the water.

January 1935 to June 28, 1935: San Francisco tower construction.

August 2, 1935 to September 27, 1935: Harbor Tug and Barge Company strung the first wire cables to support the footwalks (aka catwalks) constructed across the Golden Gate Strait in preparation for main cable spinning.

October 1935 to May 1936: Main cable spinning and compression.

April 1936: Start of the Sausalito lateral approach road which was constructed as a W.P.A. project.

July 1936 to December 14, 1936: Suspended structure.

July 21, 1936: Start of San Francisco approach viaduct structures and Fort Point arch construction.

November 18, 1936: Two sections of the Bridge’s main span were joined in the middle. A brief ceremony marked the occasion when groups from San Francisco and Marin met and exchanged remarks at the center of the span. Major Thomas L. McKenna, Catholic Chaplin of Fort Scott, blessed the span while sprinkling holy water.

January 19, 1937 to April 19, 1937: Roadway completed.

FULL-TIME CAMPER TRAVEL: CATHERINE GREGORY – June Lake Loop In The EASTERN SIERRAS, California (VIDEO)

Filmed and Edited by: Catherine Gregory

Come along on a road trip to the Eastern Sierra. I know that many viewers aren’t able to hike for varying reasons so I wanted to create a video of locations that are all accessible by vehicle (during the non heavy snow months). No hiking required. These are spots everyone can enjoy and all very beautiful….including 4 lakes within the June Lake Loop.

Tours: “Stunning” Spanish Renaissance Revival Home In San Francisco, CA (AD)

“You just sort of gulp,” Marino explains of projects like the sprawling 1916 San Francisco mansion that he labored on for more than three years, overhauling its nearly two dozen rooms for effervescent East Coast transplants with three teenagers, two French bulldogs, and a passion for pedigreed real estate.

“It was a Herculean task,” Marino continues. “There was no roof, the exterior walls were under boarding, and there were no floor slabs. It all looks so pretty now, but it was painful.” And, he quips with a laugh, “if there’s an earthquake anywhere in North America, from Vancouver to Teotihuacán, for God’s sake run here.”

Not only is the house in the city’s Pacific Heights enclave, one of the most theatrical residences ever conceived by the genius society architect Willis Polk, the Spanish Renaissance Revival palacio—wrapped around a two-story courtyard crowned with a vast glass roof—had long been home to one of Marino’s friends, Georgette “Dodie” Rosekrans.

The husband and wife also possessed phenomenal sangfroid, accepting with barely a blink the seismic requirements that demanded gutting the house and driving concrete pilings 30 feet into the ground.

She was a tiny, couture-clad movie-theater heiress, while her husband, John, was a Spreckels sugar–fortune scion who also manufactured, of all things, Hula Hoops and Frisbees. As for the four-story house where they lived from 1979 until their respective deaths (his in 2001, hers in 2010), it’s been described, with good reason, as the most beautiful house in America.

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