Tag Archives: Animals

Wildlife: A Chameleon Birthing On Mount Kenya

In these frozen peaks, a chameleon gives birth to live young as it is too cold to lay eggs out in the open.

 In East Africa, during the day, on the high slopes of Mount Kenya the tropical sun keeps the cold at bay – but at night the frost descends. During this cycle of freeze and thaw, a pregnant high casqued chameleon must choose the right time to give birth, if her new-borns are to escape the deadly night freeze.

Wildlife: A Pallas’s Cat In The Steppes Of Mongolia

Dinnertime is a gamble for Pallas’s cats, and this one’s hangry. Relative to their body size, they have the shortest legs of any cat, which makes attacking prey in a timely fashion somewhat tricky…

The Pallas’s cat, also known as the manul, is a small wild cat with long and dense light grey fur. Its rounded ears are set low on the sides of the head. Its head-and-body length ranges from 46 to 65 cm with a 21 to 31 cm long bushy tail. 

Covers: New York Times Magazine – Sept 25, 2022

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SIX PHOTOGRAPHERS JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD IN SEARCH OF ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS.

Horses that resemble My Little Ponies (but on Mars). Caimans that eat pythons. Monkeys that live alongside these caimans. High-fiving raccoons. Searching for a snow leopard. Six photographers. Six stories of animal encounters.

THE VOYAGES ISSUE
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueSearching for Wild Animals, Across the WorldFor the magazine’s Voyages Issue, six photographers in pursuit of animal encounters.By The New York Times Magazine
Matthew Pillsbury for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueLessons From a Lifetime of Animal VoyagesThere is an animal-size hole at the center of modern life. Some of us will search the world to fill it.By Sam Anderson
Robin Schwartz for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside Seoul’s Wild Animal CafesArctic foxes. Sheep. Raccoons. See them before they’re gone.Photographs by Robin Schwartz
Antoine d’Agata/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueMeeting the Beasts of the Jungle in French GuianaAfter two years without human visitors, the monkeys were restless.Photographs by Antoine d’Agata
Yael Martínez/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside an Animal Sanctuary in Bolivia Where Tourists Can HelpPlaces like Senda Verde, a refuge in the tropical Andes, offer an alternative to cruises and safaris.Photographs by Yael Martínez
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueThe Fantastical Beauty of Icelandic HorsesThese stout little creatures look like My Little Ponies on Mars. The photographer Gareth McConnell had to see for himself.Photographs by Gareth McConnell

Read the Voyages Issue here. https://nyti.ms/3C2WvCo

Wildlife Views: Filming Wolf Pups In Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

In a race against time, the crew works to microchip a pack of wolf pups and return the pups to their den as quickly as possible—all while setting up their cameras in time to capture some truly heart-melting shots. Witness the wildlife of North America as you’ve never seen it before on #AmericaTheBeautifulSeries, narrated by Michael B. Jordan.

Filmed in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Voyageurs National Park is in northern Minnesota, near the Canadian border. It covers a vast area and is known for its forests, waterways and huge, island-dotted Rainy, Kabetogama and Namakan lakes. The Ellsworth Rock Gardens, created by artist Jack Ellsworth, are a series of abstract sculptures on a terraced outcrop. The remote Kettle Falls area has a dam and a red-roofed hotel, both from the early 20th century. 

Nature: The Wildlife And Landscapes Of Costa Rica

Costa Rica is a rugged, rainforested Central American country with coastlines on the Caribbean and Pacific. Though its capital, San Jose, is home to cultural institutions like the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum, Costa Rica is known for its beaches, volcanoes, and biodiversity. Roughly a quarter of its area is made up of protected jungle, teeming with wildlife including spider monkeys and quetzal birds.


Video timeline: 0:00
intro of costa rica 0:03 Yellow snake curled 0:06 Aerial view of irazu volcano 0:08 Snake python 0:11 Cinematic view of oak tree 0:16 Close up view of iguana 0:22 skydiving in Costa Rica 0:26 nauyaca waterfalls 0:31 galloping horse 0:39 Aerial view of pavon bay 0:46 waterfall rio celeste 0:50 Close up iguana 0:53 Drone view of palm oil 0:58 tree frog 1:01 Trachycephalus 1:04 Montezuma Beach 1:09 Oka tree 1:13 naped snake 1:18 Blue Yellow Macaw 1:23 Green Python 1:28 Rio celeste waterfall 1:35 meanders river 1:45 Bilobatum 1:49 punta banco Beach 1:57 irazu volcano 2:05 Close up view of butterfly 2:08 Corcovado 2:13 Playa Zancudo 2:21 manuel antonio 2:32 Green iguana 2:46 tortoiseshell 2:59 Costa Rica rainforest 3:05 quetzal Bird 3:11 Sloth 3:16 Irazu volcano 3:22 paragliding 3:29 skydiving 3:34 la paz waterfall 3:43 whales 3:50 Coto river Aerial view 4:02 Aerial costarica 4:10 Beautiful parrots 4:18 Forest Frog 4:25 Rain forest 4:29 iguana 4:35 Wild lizard 4:40 flamingos 4:47 capucinus 4:55 Rain forest 5:02 capuchin 5:09 Violetear

Views: Turtle Hatchlings Great Barrier Reef Beach

Evolution: How Nature Is Adapting To Urban Sprawl

It’s a new and surprising chapter in the theory of evolution. According to recent studies, it’s in our cities, of all places, that animals and plants adapt particularly quickly to changing living conditions.

Nature’s response to the spread of cities is astonishing: Why do catfish in the river of a French city systematically prey on urban pigeons on the banks? Why do female birds on a university campus in California suddenly change their mating behavior? How do mice in New York’s Central Park cope with an altered diet of human food waste? How have killifish in the Atlantic built up resistance to deadly chemical waste?

And, is it possible for moths to adapt to nighttime light pollution? New research provides surprising new insights into Darwin’s theory of evolution. Nowhere else do animals and plants adapt so quickly to new living conditions as in cities. Biologists have long known that animals and plants occupy new habitats in the vicinity of humans.

But now, new genetic analyses show that these adaptations are accompanied by significant changes in DNA. Even more surprising: these evolutionary changes have not occurred over periods of millennia, but within just a few decades. The process has amazed scientists, who watch as nature transforms even our most hostile man-made interventions — pollution, light pollution, noise, garbage and dense development — into creative energy for new adaptations. Some researchers believe that our cities may soon develop their own, brand-new life forms. What are the implications of these developments for the balance between humans and nature on our planet?

Cover: National Wildlife Magazine – Aug/Sep 2022

Surrounded by golden light, a mule deer stands in grasslands.

National Wildlife Magazine – August/September 2022

Burning Up

Heat, drought and wildfires are ravaging western wildlife while conservationists try to help ecosystems adapt

By Brianna Randall – Conservation, Aug 02, 2022

Dead mussels lie along the Pacific shore of Vancouver, British Columbia, during 2021’s summer heat wave. Scientists estimate that the record-breaking heat killed more than 1 billion marine animals off the coasts of British Columbia and Washington state.
(Photo by Christopher Harley/University of British Columbia)

GASPING SALMON WITH INFECTED LESIONS. Emaciated deer searching sagebrush flats for water. Clams and mussels boiled to death in their shells. Last summer, temperatures in the Northwest soared to record highs in the triple digits, killing more than 1 billion marine animals in the Salish Sea and stressing wildlife from the Pacific to the Rocky Mountains. Simultaneously, ongoing drought in the Southwest—which began in 2000 and is the region’s driest 22-year period in 1,200 years—is causing plants to wither, springs to dry up and wildfires to engulf entire landscapes.