Tag Archives: Ireland

Timelapse Travel: Mourne Mountains In Ireland (4K)

‘Mourne’ explores the beautiful and rugged landscapes of the Kingdom of Mourne, some of the most scenic on the Island of Ireland. Shot over a full year, from September 2020 to September 2021, I set myself the ambitious aim to capture the most comprehensive timelapse study of the Mourne Mountains and one that felt true to the challenging conditions the landscape presents. The project involved over 100 treks with a weight of 20kg and 40 wild camps many in sub zero conditions. I’ve never been as cold and battered by the elements. The driving rain. Wind strong enough to blow you off your feet. Hiking in snow up to your waist. The year felt like a battle. I like to think the mountains won.

It really has been a labour of love, spending countless hours capturing the slow transition of the seasons. Watching the land, textures and colours slowly change, the clouds caressing and spilling over mountain peak and valleys.

The Mourne Mountains, also called the Mournes or Mountains of Mourne, are a granite mountain range in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland. They include the highest mountains in Northern Ireland, the highest of which is Slieve Donard at 850 m.

Walking Tours: Belfast – Northern Ireland (4K)

Belfast is Northern Ireland’s capital. It was the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, which famously struck an iceberg and sunk in 1912. This legacy is recalled in the renovated dockyards’ Titanic Quarter, which includes the Titanic Belfast, an aluminium-clad museum reminiscent of a ship’s hull, as well as shipbuilder Harland & Wolff’s Drawing Offices and the Titanic Slipways, which now host open-air concerts.

Views: ‘Europe From Above’ – National Geographic UK

Europe From Above takes you on an unforgettable journey, full of unique adventures, to explore the spectacular features of six European countries: Norway, Croatia, Portugal, Switzerland, Ireland, and Iceland. Not only does this series show you the beautiful landscapes of each nation, but unravels the magical landmarks that each location has to offer.

From visiting Ireland’s precious grey seals, the magical Northern Lights of Norway and Croatia’s floating village, to exploring the Douro vineyard in Portugal, Iceland’s famous hot springs and stargazing from Swiss mountains, each adventure more exciting than the next. Come along on this trip and discover an amazing new perspectives on counties you thought you knew.

Aerial Views: Landscapes & Coastlines Of Ireland (4K)

The Republic of Ireland occupies most of the island of Ireland, off the coast of England and Wales. Its capital, Dublin, is the birthplace of writers like Oscar Wilde, and home of Guinness beer. The 9th-century Book of Kells and other illustrated manuscripts are on show in Dublin’s Trinity College Library. Dubbed the “Emerald Isle” for its lush landscape, the country is dotted with castles like medieval Cahir Castle. 

Views: The Wild Coastlines Of Britain And Ireland

The spectacular coastlines of Britain and Ireland get battered by weather in autumn and winter, but on a fine day in spring or summer they’re the equal of anything in the world.

Rosie Paterson, August 20, 2021

The west coast of Ireland bears the brunt of some of the Atlantic Ocean’s most terrific swells. As a result, its beaches are a Mecca for surfers. Lahinch — a mile-long, sandy crescent — is regarded as one of the best. And remember your golf clubs: the links course at Lahinch is a joy, one of the finest in the country.

On a sunny day, Luskentyre beach could easily be mistaken for somewhere in the Caribbean — something that could be said of all the best beaches in Scotland. The sand is a brilliant sugar-white sweep and the sea a vivid shade of blue. Sand dunes to the north provide protection on windier days and there are excellent walking trails for those who don’t fancy a dip. If bad weather sweeps in, you’ll certainly feel ready for a dram afterwards.

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World Affairs: Emerging Markets Growth, Tunisia Turmoil, Ireland Dry Bars

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: growth in emerging markets, Tunisia faces a constitutional crisis (9:53) and dry bars of Ireland (16:03)

Irish Estates: A History Of Stormont Castle, Belfast

The Stormont estate was attractive because of its proximity to Belfast and the prominent building site that it offered overlooking the city. Entirely incidental to the purchase, but part and parcel of it, was a substantial 19th- century house called Stormont Castle. There was local opposition to demolition so it was spontaneously absorbed into this developing governmental landscape.

John GoodallJuly 11, 2021

In 1922, the castle became the official residence of Sir James Craig, the first Prime Minister of Northern Ireland. That function ceased in 1940, when it became simply the Prime Minister’s office and was additionally occupied by the Cabinet Secretariat and the head of the Northern Ireland Civil Service. From 1972, following the establishment of direct rule from Westminster, the castle became the headquarters of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and, since 1998 and the Good Friday Agreement, it has accommodated the offices of the First and Deputy Ministers of Northern Ireland.

Read more at Country Life UK

Aerial Views: Ireland (4K)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George’s Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

Morning News Podcast: Ireland Reunification & Diplomacy, Art Immersion

The province’s largest party aligned with Britain has lost its leader; in the 100 years since the island was split it has rarely seemed so close to reuniting. Diplomacy, as with so much else, had to go online during the pandemic—and emerged more efficient and inclusive than many expected. And how art-lovers are getting ever more fully immersed